Khandvi: Savoury chickpea flour rolls, Gluten free

Image

By  Ratnauntitled-3untitled-2

The  rain  drops  hit  the  window  at  an  angle  and  slid  down  causing  an  abstract  design  on  the  glass. The  outside  view  from  my  kitchen  window,  that  I  was  enjoying  so  far,  got  blurred.

Rain  often  reminds  me  of  my  days  in  India.  After  the  oppressive  heat  of  summer,  we  welcomed  the  rains  with  open  arms.

But  prairie  rain  does  not  have  a  season.  There  would  be  dry  days,  more  dry  days,  days  that  I’d  water  my  garden  thoroughly,  and  then  suddenly  the  rains  would  start.  The  daylight  hours  are  very  long  in  the  Spring  and  Summer,  extending  for  almost  twenty  hours  on  the  Summer  Solistice.

The  sun  and   rain  create  a  magic.  Buds  swell  to  give  way  to  the  leaves,  eggs  hatch  to  bring  life,  seeds  sprout  to  give  birth  to  seedlings.  Anything  and  everything  grows.

untitled A  rainy  weather  calls  for  a  cup  of  very  hot  tea  and  some  snacks.  Khandvi  is  a  snack  from  the  very  western  region  of  India.  It  can  also  be  eaten  for  breakfast  or  as  an  appetizer.

No,  I  am  not  on  a  gluten  free  diet.  Looking  back  though  I  do  have  quite  a  few  gluten  free  recipes  in  my  blog.  You  can  take  a  peek  at  them  here,  here  and  here.

Considering  the  rising  number  of  people  that  are  allergic  to  gluten,  I  feel  quite  excited  to  offer  these  easy,  healthy  choices. untitled-4I  have  adapted  this  recipe  from  Masterchef  Tarala  Dalal.untitled-8untitled-5  There  is  a  variant  of  the  Khandvi  where  a  filling  is  added  inside.  I  have  kept  things  simple  today.

What  do  you  like  with  your  cuppa?  Leave  me  a  note  below.  I  would  love  to  hear  from  you.untitled-6untitled-7Recipe:

Ingredients;

Besan  ( Chickpea flour )                                                                            1cup

Yoghurt                                                                                                       2  cups

Water                                                                                                         2  cups

Mustard  seeds                                                                                            1  tsp

Sesame  seeds                                                                                           1  tsp

Grated  ginger  and  green  chillies                                                                2  tsp

Turmeric  powder                                                                                          1/4  tsps

Asafoetida                                                                                                  1  tsps

Curry  leaves                                                                                                6-7

Coriander  leaves  chopped                                                                       2  Tbsps

Grated  coconut                                                                                        2  Tbsps

Canola  oil                                                                                                 1  Tbsp

Lemon  juice                                                                                             1  Tbsp

Salt  to  taste

Method;

Mix  the  water  and  yoghurt  in  a  bowl.  Set  aside.

Sieve  the  Besan.  Take  a  big  saucepan,  add  the  Besan,  yoghurt  –  water  mixture,  ginger  chilly  paste,  turmeric  powder,  half  the  asafoetida,  salt  and  lemon  juice.  Mix  these  to  a  lump  free  smooth  paste.

Invert  stainless  plates  if  you  have.  I  took  two  cookie  sheets.  Grease  the  inverted  side.

Put  the  saucepan  with  the  above  Besan  mixture  on  a  medium  high  flame.  Keep  stirring  continuously  for  about  15  minutes.

The  mixture  will  thicken.  Take  a  small  spoonful  of  this  mixture  on  the  greased  plate,  let  cool  for  a  couple  minutes,  if  the  sides  lift  up  easy,  the  batter  is  ready.  Turn  the  gas  off.

Drop  a  big  spoonful  of  the  batter  while  still  hot  on  the  greased  plate.  Spread  it  out  thin  using  a  palette.  Repeat  with  the  rest  of  the  batter.  Let  it cool.  Cut  thin  strips  with  a  sharp  knife.  Refer  to  the  second  picture  above.  Roll  the  strips  and  collect  on  the  serving  platter.

Tadka;

Take  the  canola  oil  in  a  small  nonstick  bowl  on  high  flame.  Add  the  mustard  seeds,  sesame  seeds  and  curry  leaves.  When  the  mustard  seeds  stop  sputtering  add  the  rest  of  the  asafoetida.  Turn  the  gas  off  as  soon  as  there  is  a  nutty  aroma  –  about  20  seconds.  Spread  this  over  the  Khandvi.

Garnish  with  chopped  coriander  leaves  and  grated  coconut.  Enjoy.

Inside  Scoop,

Besan  is  chickpea  flour,  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores,  The  Real  Canadian  Superstore  and  Walmart  in  their  World  food  aisle.

continuous  stirring  is  very  important.

Although  not  in  English,  this  video  might  be  helpful.

 

Nimbu chawal: Lemon rice

Image

By  Ratna,

untitled-4 The  white  butterfly  flew  aimlessly,  sitting  on  the  Prairie  crocus  once  and  on  the  Anemones  next,  going  back  to  the  crocuses  again. The  Robins  and  the  Blackbirds  are  tree  hopping.  It  is  spring  here  in  the  Prairies.  The  season  of  budding  and  blooming,  of  nesting  and  nursing.  The  season  of  a  new  beginning.

untitled-10

“Chawlo  garite  ghure  ashi”  let’s  go  for  a  drive,  offered  my  husband  N.  That  seemed  just  the  right  thing  to  do.  I  packed  some  snacks  and  my  camera  before  we  took  to  the  roads.

untitled-8

It  felt  like  the  nature  just  woke  up.  The  sky  so  clear  and  blue,  as  if  reassuring  the  surroundings,  everything  is  going  to  be  fine.  The  bent  bud  taking  that  clue  to  straighten  itself  first  then  opening  up  one  petal  at  a  time,  ever  so  slowly.

untitled-14

Lemon  rice  is  a  dish  that  requires  very  little  work.  It  is  an  excellent  way  to  use  up  left  over  rice  too.  Its  versatility  doesn’t  stop  there.  If  you  are  wondering  what    it  pairs  with?   It  is  as  comfortable  with  an  elaborate  vegetable  dish  at  its  side,  as  it  is  with  a  few  dollops  of  yoghurt  and  some  crispy  Poppadums.

untitled-16

The  wooden  bench  by  the  side  of  the  water  seemed  the  perfect  site  to  enjoy  our  snacks.  The  crunch  from  the  nuts,  the  tangy  taste  of  the  lemon  rice  complemented  each  other  just  right.

We  drove  aimlessly  on  the  country  roads.  ” Weren’t  we  here  a  few  minutes  back”  sometimes  we  said  in  unison.

It  didn’t  matter.

I  thought  of  the  white  butterfly…

untitled-6

Recipe:  Serves  3-4  as  snacks.

Ingredients:

Cooked  rice                                                           1  cup

Ghee                                                                        1  Tbsp

Mustard  seeds                                                        1/4  tsp

Chana  dal                                                               1/2  Tbsp

Urad  dal                                                                  1/2  Tbsp

Peanuts                                                                     1  Tbsp

Cashew  nuts                                                            1  Tbsp

Curry  leaves                                                             5-6

Dry  red  chillies                                                         1-2

Coriander  leaves  chopped                                       1  Tsp

Turmeric  powder                                                     1/2  tsp

Salt  to  taste

Juice  of one  lemon

Method;

Take  the  ghee  in  a  saucepan  on  high  heat.  Fry  the  peanuts  till  golden  brown,  collect  them  on  paper  towels.  Add  the  mustard  seeds,  wait  till  it  pops,  then  add  the  chana  dal.  Fry  a  bit  till  it  changes  colour,  add  the  turmeric  powder,  cashews  red  chillies,  salt  and  curry  leaves.  Use  the  spatula  to  give  it  a  stir,  make  sure  they  don’t  stick  to  the  bottom  of  the  pan.  Put  the  gas  off  as  soon  as  cashews  brown  a  bit.

Add  the  rice,  mix  very  gently  so  the  grains  remain  intact.  Sprinkle  the  lemon  juice  on  top  and  give  one  more  stir.  Garnish  with  the  fried  peanuts  and  chopped  coriander  leaves.

You  are  done.

Inside  Scoop;

Curry  leaves  are  available  in  Indian  supermarkets.  Fresh  ones  are  the  first  choice,  dried  ones  are  available  too.

Urad  dal  is  Skinned  Black  lentil.

Chana  dal  is  Split  Desi  chick  peas.

Ghee  can  be  store  bought  or  made  at  home  too. Here  is  how  to.

Moong Pakon pitha: Yellow Moong bean and rice flour cake: A modern take: Gluten free.

Image

By Ratna

untitled-6

Buy  her  a  gift  or  give  her  an  experience?  It  was  a  hard decision  for  mother’s  day  over  the  weekend.

“Mooch  Moochey  hoyecchhe”.  It’s  nice  and  crispy,  she  said  after a  bite  in  the  Pitha,  the  deep  creases  on  the  back  of  her  hands  almost  matching  the  design  on  the  Pithas.  She  looked  into  my  eyes  and  she  didn’t.  I  could  see  Ma  was  transported  to  a  different  time,  a  different  land.

untitled

A  land  with  many  rivers.  As  a  little  girl  she  remembers  those  carefree  days.  Taking  off  with  her  siblings  to  explore  the  neighbourhood  while  the  elders  in  the  family  were  busy  in  the  kitchen.  “Nodir  dhare  ekta  mishti  gondho  beroto”,  There  used  to  be  a  sweet  smell  on  the  river  bank,  she  is  not  sure  if  that  was  from  an  unfamiliar  flower  or  the  paddy  fields  nearby.  It  used  to  be  East  Bengal  then,  it  is  Bangladesh  now.

I  have  heard  these  stories  many  times.  My  octogenarian  mother  sometimes  mistakenly  calls  me  by  my  sisters  name  and  cannot  remember  what  she  had  for  breakfast  that  day.  But  the  stories  always  remain  consistent.

untitled-5

Osteoporosis  is  rapidly  claiming  her  four  feet  eleven  frame.  Arthritis  causing  her  knuckles  to  swell  and  fingers  to  twist,  as  if  daring  her  to  carry  on  the  daily  chores.  These  are  the  same  hands  that  tended  to  our  sore  knees  after  a  game,  embroidered  fine  designs  on  our  dresses  or  even  disciplined  us  when  needed.

Ki  korey  banali?   Khub  shundor  hoyeche.”    How  did  you  make  it?  They are  beautiful,  she  said,  overlooking  the  imperfections.

I  could  see  the  memories  that  were  coming  back  to  her.  Memories  of  the  land  that  she  will  not  be  visiting  again  but  live  only  through  these  experiences..

Gift  or  experience?   Glad  I  chose  to  bring  her  an  experience  for  Mother’s  day.

untitled-4

Recipe:  Number  of  yield  depends  on  the  size  of  the  design  you  choose.  About  18-20  on  average.

Ingredients;

Yellow  Moong  beans                                       1/2  cup

Rice  powder                                                    1  cup

Cardamom  powder                                        1/2  tsp

Cinnamon  stick                                             1  inch  long  2  pcs

Sugar                                                              1  cup

Canola  oil                                                     1  Tbsp  plus  more  for  frying

Salt                                                                1/4  tsp

Method;

Dry  roast  the  yellow  moong   bean  in  a  sauce  pan  on  high  heat.  Keep  stirring  to make  sure  it  doesn’t  burn.  It  is  done  as  soon  as  it  gets  a  bit  of  colour.  Wash  with  running  water.

Take  this  roasted  moong  in  a  saucepan.  Add  about  four  glasses  of  water,  salt,  one  Tbsp of  oil,  cardamom  powder,  cinnamon  sticks  and  boil  until  mushy,  about  an  hour,  faster  if  using  a  pressure  cooker.  Discard  the  cinnamon  sticks.  Add  the  rice  powder  and  stir  with  a  whisk  to  mix  thoroughly.  Put  the  gas  off  and  cover  the  mixture  till  it  cools  a  bit.

Transfer  this  mixture  to  a  bowl.  Knead  with  oil  dipped  palm  to  form  a  smooth  dough.  Add  a  sprinkle  of  rice  powder  if  sticky.

Cut  out  small  balls,  the  size  of  a  lime.  Roll  it  such  it  stays  about  1/4th  inch  thick.  Refer  to  the  picture  above  and  this  video.  Draw  a  design  of  your  choice.  Use  a  tooth  pick  to  accentuate  the  edges  of  the  design.  Using  a  spatula  carefully  lift  these  and  collect  on  a  plate.  Keep  them  covered.

Take   canola  oil,  an  inch  deep  in  a  non  stick  frying  pan  on  medium  heat.  Carefully  fry  the  Pithas  till  golden  brown,  gently  turning  once.  Collect  them  on  a  kitchen  towel.

Syrup;

Take  the  sugar  with  with  3/4th  cup  water  on  high  heat.  Work  to  make  a  syrup  with  one  string  consistency.  Follow  this  instruction.  Dip  the  Pithas  carefully,  turn  once  and  remove.

Enjoy.

Inside  Scoop;

Cooking  the  Pithas  is  a  folk  tradition,  hence  all  the  design  is  done  by  hand.  This  takes  a  lot  of  practise  and  patience.

Being  a  novice  with  this  Pitha,  I  took  help  from  cookie  cutters,  giving  it  a  modern  take.

 

Fafda: Chickpea flour sticks: GF. Done 2 ways.

Image

By Ratna

untitled-8

A  cup  of  tea  needs  something  deep fried  to  go  with  it.

You  see,  Teley  Bhaja,  or  “deep  fried”  is  a  genre  on  its  own. Staying  true  to  my  Indian  roots,  I  can  deep  fry  almost  anything.  It  could  be a  variant  of  any  of  the  flours  with  herbs  and  spices,  or  it  could  be  any  vegetable,  edible  flower  or  leaf  and  a  lot  of  other  things.

untitled-15

We  had  a  gorgeous  weekend  here.   With  the  snow  gone,  and  the  sun  rays  actually  feeling  warm,  the  nature  is  changing  fast.

There  were  so  many  firsts.  My  first  flower of  the  season.  Aren’t  the  crocuses  beautiful?  The  first  outdoor  photo  shoot  of  this  season.  We  had  tea  on  the  deck,  which  was  a  first  too  after  five  months!

I  decided  to  make  this  snack  to  go  with  this  special  day.  Fafda  is  a  chick  pea  flour  based  appetizer.  With  a  few  chosen  spices,  it  takes  no  time  to  whip  up  a  batch.  Being  gluten  free  is  a  bonus,  in  case  you  have  a  friend  who  is  on  special  diet.

untitled-7

untitled-5

Oh  one  more  first.  I  gave  a  try  in  baking  half  the  dough.  No  more  guilt  feeling  from  deep  fried  foods.

I  personally  still  prefer  the  deep  fried  ones.  Old  habits  die  hard,  they  say.  I’m  glad  that  I  can  offer  the  baked  recipe  too.  Do you  have  any  preference  with  your  tea?  Or  coffee?

untitled-12untitled-14

Recipe:  Made  28  pieces.

Ingredients;

Chick  pea  flour  (  Besan  )                                                   2  cups

Canola  oil                                                                             5  Tbsps  and  more  for  frying

Carom  seeds  (  Ajwain  )                                                      1  Tbsps  crushed  by  hand

Salt                                                                                        To  taste

Papad  Khar  (  Sodium  bicarbonate  )                                    2  tsp

Water                                                                                     1/2 – 2/3 rd  cup

Method;

Sift  the  Besan.  Add  the  Ajwain  or  Carom  seeds  and  5  Tbsps  of  Canola  oil.

Dissolve  the  salt  and  Papad  khar  in  the  water.

Mix  this  water  to  the  above  dry  ingredients  and  knead  to  form  a  tight  dough,  about  6-7  minutes.  Cut  small  balls  from   the  dough.

Put  one  ball  on  a  cutting  board.  Press  with  finger  to  elongate  it.  Now  put  the palm  of  your  hand  on  it  and  keep  pressing  at  the  same  time  moving  the  hand  forward,  till  the  ball  gets  rolled  into  a  flat  about  4- 41/2  inches  long.  The  heel  of  the  hand  actually  does  the  job  of  the  rolling  pin.

Now  take  a  palette  knife  slide  it  under  the  flat,  starting  from  top  down,  in  one  continuos  quick  stroke.  arrange  these  on  a  kitchen  towel.

For  frying;

Heat  Canola  oil  about  an  inch  deep  in  a  frying  pan.  The  oil  is  ready  when  a  tiny  piece  of  dough  thrown  in  it,  floats  up  right  away.

Carefully  drop  the  flats  in  hot  oil  in  batches.  Press  them  gently  with  the  back  of  the  ladle.  They  are  ready  as  soon  as  they  start  to  change  colour,  about  a  minute.

Collect  them  on  a  paper  towel.

For  baking;

Preheat  oven  to  375  degrees  F.

Line  the  flats  on  a  foil  lined  baking  tray.  Bake  them  for  8-10  mts.

Serve  them  with  your  choice  of  dip,  hummus  or  ketchup.

I  like  mine  with  a  cup  of  piping  hot  tea.

Inside  Scoop;

This  is  traditionally  served  with  deep  fried  green  chillies.  Frying  lessens  the  heat,  the  chillies  can  be  deseeded  too.

Papad  Khar  is  available  online.

The  upright  ones  are  deep  fried  as  opposed  to  the  horizontal  ones  which  are  baked.

Refer  to  the  picture  collage  if  you  feel  lost.

 

 

 

Lavang latika : Clove twisties.

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-19

Celebrations  need  sweets.  Period.

In  as  much  as  we  write  volumes  about  the  bitter  side  of  sweets,  we  can’t  do  without  them.  Not  in  my  household.  You  see  my  husband  has  a  big  sweet  tooth. As  I  said  before,  the  innocent  enquiry   after  supper  about  the  leftover  sweets,  if  any,  actually  translates  to  can  I  have  some  sweets  right  now?

untitled-14

Now  when  it  comes  to  birthdays,  there  is  no  denying  this  treat.  Can  we?   Payesh  or  rice  pudding  is  the  must  have  for  birthdays.

This  year  I  decided  to  be  a  bit  more  adventurous  for  his  birthday.

untitled-5  I  tried  my  hand  in  these  beauties.  They  are  variously  called  Lavang  latika  or   lobongo  lotika.  A   very  distant  cousin  of  Danish.  Maybe?

I  loosely  translated  it  to  Clove  twisties.

untitled-16

It  is  a  pastry  with  filling  inside.  A  clove  is  strategically  placed  to  hold  things  in  place.  Deep  fried  and  then  dunked  in  sugar  syrup.  Crispy  to  bite  in.  A  couple  chews,  the  flaky  sweet  exterior  reveals  the  delicious  filling  inside.  The  ever  so  slight  crunch  still   left  from  the  coconut.

untitled-17

Oh!  Who  am  I  fooling.  I  am  a  sucker  too  when  it  comes  to  the  deep  fried  and  syrup  dunked  combinations…

Recipe:  Made  12  pieces.

Ingredients;

Cloves                                                           12

Oil                                                                 As  needed  for  frying

For  the  pastry;

All  purpose  flour                                         1  cup

Canola  oil                                                     3  Tbsps

Water                                                           As   needed

For  the  filling;

Grated  coconut                                         3/4th  cup

Condensed  milk                                        1/2  cup

Milk  powder                                               1/2  cup

Cardamom  powder                                   1/4th  tsp

For  the  syrup;

Sugar                                                          1  cup

Water                                                          3/4  cup

Method;

Pastry;

In  a  bowl  mix  the  flour  and  3  Tbsps  oil.  Rub  the  flour  between  the  palm  of  your  hands.  It  should  hold  form  when  held  in  a  closed  fist.  Now  add  water  to  make  it  into  a  dough.  Cover  with  a  damp  cloth  and  let  it  sit  for  half  hour.

Filling;

In  a  pan  take  all  the  ingredients  listed  under  filling.  Keep  the  heat  on  medium.  Carefully  stir  the  mixture  till  it  forms  a  soft  dough,  about  4  minutes.  Turn  the  gas  off.  Work  while  the  mixture  is  still  warm,  to  make  12  small  balls.  I  had  a  bit  leftover.

Syrup;

Take  the  sugar  and  water  in  a  saucepan  on  high  heat.  Bring  it  to  a  boil.  Turn  the  gas  to  medium  now  and  let  it  simmer  for  about  3-4  minutes.  Pour  a  drop  of  this  syrup  in  a  bowl.  Wait  till  it  cools  down.  Touch  it  with  the  first  finger  and  thumb.  A  string  when  formed  as  the  fingers  are  taken  apart  indicates  the  syrup  is  done.

Assembling;

Divide  the  dough  in  12  balls.

Roll  one  ball  to  an  elliptical  shape,  not  round. Brush  the  surface  with  water.  Sit  the  filling  in  the  centre.  Press  gently.  It  will  make  the  filling  a  bit  elongated  and  stick  it  to  the  pastry.  Refer  to  the  picture  collage  above.  Fold  the  left  side  over  the  filling.  Press  at  the  folds.  Repeat  with  the  right  side.  Press  at  the  folds.  Turn  over.  Bring  the  top  and  bottom  half  of  the  pastry  together.  Press.  Add  a  clove  firmly  to  hold  things  together.

Take  about  an  inch  deep  oil  in  a  pan  on  high  heat.  Drop  a  pinch  of  dough  in  it.  The  oil  is  ready  when  it  floats  right  up.  Drop  the  lavang  latikas  carefully in  oil.  Crank  the  heat  down  to  medium.  Fry  till  golden.

I  fried  in  two  batches.

Dip  them  in  sugar  syrup  on  low  flame  for  a  minute.  Collect  them  on  a  bowl.

Inside  scoop;

Pressing  the  pastry  with  each  fold  ensures  that  it  won’t  open  up  while  frying.

Hot  sugar  syrup  can  take  skin  right  off.

If  the  filling  gets  very  firm,  add  a  tsp  of  milk  to  get  it  pliable  again.

 

 

 

Chana dal cheela: Savoury Husked split desi chick peas pancake. GF

Image

 By  Ratna

untitled-2

Ki  Shundor,  How  beautiful.  Ki  Shundor  we  kept  repeating  these  two  words.

N,  my  husband  and  I  took  a  break  from  the  harsh  Prairie  winter  and  travelled  to  India  last  month.  We  had  a  fantastic  time  with  our  family.  We  also  managed  a  few  days  in  the  Pink  city,  Jaipur.  More  about  the  trip  later.

Shundor  rong,  beautiful  colour.  That’s  what  it  was.  There  was  colour  everywhere.  Having  spent  the  last  four  months  in  the  great  white  Northern  Alberta,  our  eyes  were  taking  in  the  surroundings,  as  parched  throat  takes  to  water.

I  think  it  was  the  walls  that  were  painted  pink  throughout  the  city  and  the  brightly  coloured  saris  and  turbans  of  the  locals  that  stood  out.  Or  was  it  the   resident  peacock  with  his   iridescent  blue  neck  roaming  around  the  property  unabashedly?

untitled-4

No,  No.  It  was  the  brilliant  colour  of  the  flowers  carpeting  the  walls  with  the  playful  Hummingbirds  busy  gathering  nectar.

I  am  confused.  You  see  what  I  mean?  After  all  it  isn’t  called  pink  city  for  no  reason.

We  did  the  Palaces  and  Museums  which  were  breathtaking.  The  food  blogger  in  me  always  longs  for  local  food  and  produce  markets.  I  don’t  mean  the  big  supermarkets,  but  the  village  lady  hawking  fresh  vegetables  in  her  big  wicker  basket  or  the  basic  kitchen  gadgets  from  the  weathered  hands  of  the  Iron smith.

untitled-2

There  was  a  lazy  day  when  we  had  breakfast  in  the  hotel  lawn.  The  white  wrought  iron  chairs  neatly  arranged  in  the  well  tendered  garden.  We  had  these  Cheelas  served  with  a  spicy  potato  curry.

untitled-7

The  hot  masala  chai  took  care  of  the  early  morning  nip  in  the  air.

There  was  something  else  in  the  air.  The  Pergola  in  the  middle  of  the  lawn  housed  the  flutist.  Adjusting  the  big  turban  on  his  head  he  blew  air  in  the  little  piece  of  wood.  Out  came  the  notes.  Exhilarating  in  one,  melancholy  with  the  other.  It  felt  like  he  held  the  strings  to  my  soul.

untitled-6

I  had  to  pinch  myself….

Recipe:

untitled-8

Made  16  small  pancakes.

Ingredients;

Chana dal                                                                       1  cup

Shallot  cut  in  small  pcs                                                1

Cilantro                                                                            1/4 th  cup

Green  chillies                                                                  2  ( optional )

Turmeric powder                                                             1/2  tsp

Baking  powder                                                                1/4  tsp

Ajwain / Carom  seeds                                                       1/2  tsp

Salt                                                                                    To  taste

Water                                                                               As  required

Canola  oil                                                                        For  frying

Method;

Soak  the  chana  dal  in  water  for  about  couple  hours  and  grind  it  to  a  paste with  little  water.  Cut  the  shallot,  green  chillies  and  Cilantro  in  small  pieces.

In  a  bowl  mix  the  ground  dal,  shallot,  green  chillies  (  if  using  ),  cilantro  pieces,  turmeric,  baking  powder  and  carom  seeds.  Add  salt  to  taste.  Add  water  to  form  a  crepe  batter  consistency.

Heat  one  tsp  oil  in  a  non  stick  pan  on  medium  heat.  When  hot  pour  a  ladle  of  the  batter  on  it.  With  the  back  of  the  ladle  spread  it  to  about  21/2  inches  in  diameter.  Cook  for  about  4  minutes  one  side.  Add  a  tsp  of  oil  on  top  and  sides. Flip  over  and  cook  for  another  4  minutes.

Collect  them  on  a  plate.  Serve  them  hot  with  chutney,  pickle  or  yoghurt  of  your  choice.

I  served  them  with  Gongura  chutney  which  I  made  recently.  Here  is  the  recipe  for  it.

If  you  are  wondering  whether  Maple  syrup  can  be  used.  You  betcha.

Inside  Scoop;

If  the  batter  thickens  towards  the  end,  sprinkle  a  bit  water  to  bring  the  desired  consistency  back.

These  pack  well  for  kid’s  lunches  and  camping  trips  too.

Make  it  into  a  wrap  with  the  filling  of  your  choice.

 

 

Gongura chutney: Roselle chutney

Image

By Ratna,

untitled-17

It’s  been  snowing  steady  for  the  last  couple  of  days.  The  Spruce  branches  bent  under  the  weight  of  fresh  snow,  the  snow  covering  the  road  signs,  drive  ways  and  roof  shingles.  It  doesn’t  matter  if  its  spring  on  calendar  soon,  this  is  the  Prairies.  We  don’t  part  with  the  parkas,  boots  or  shovels  so  soon.

untitled-2

…The  Barbara  Cartland  romantic  novel  had  seen  better  days. Circulating  between  us  high  school  teenagers,  with  pages  having  particularly  juicy  bits  dog  eared  for repeated  referrals.  The  raw  calyces  of  Roselle   tucked  inside  our  cheeks  we  had  the  time  of  our  life.

That  was  many  many  summers ago.  With  no  internet,  facebook  or  other  modern  day  devices,  reading  and  fantasising  from  romantic  novels  took  a  major  part  of  our  evenings.

untitled-13

Roselle  (  Hibiscus  Sabdariffa  )  grew  wild  back  home  in  India.  The  bright  red,  fleshy  calyces  were  tangy  and  chewy.  Dipped  in  a  bit  of  chaat  masala,  one  bite  into  it  would  reflexly  squint  the  eye,  pucker  the  lips  followed  by  a  mouthful  of  juices…

Imagine  my  surprise  when  I  spotted  these  candied  version  of  Roselle  calyces  in  a  supermarket  in  Spain.  I  had  to  have  a  packet  no  matter  what.

Today  I  made  them  into  a  chutney.  The  calyces  were  candied,  hence  needed  very  little  sweetener.

I  served  the  chutney  with  some  savoury  pancakes.

untitled-15

There  may  be  snow  outside,  but  every  bite  into  this  chutney  took  me  halfway  across  the  world  to  a  beautiful  summer  evening.  I  can  even  hear  the  nonstop,  meaningless  giggles  of  some  carefree  teenage  girls…

Do  you  have  a  story  of  food  that  brings  back  memories  from  the  past?  I’d  love  to  hear  from  you.  Leave  me  a  comment  below.  Thanks.

untitled-9

 

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Roselle  calyces  cut  in  small  pieces                                           3  cups

Jaggery                                                                                         1  Tbsp

Mustard  seeds                                                                             1/4  tsp

Canola  oil                                                                                     1  tsp

Lime  juice                                                                                     1  tsp

Grated  ginger                                                                                1  inch  piece

Salt                                                                                                To  taste

Water                                                                                            1  cup

Method;

Heat  the  oil  in  a  sauce  pan  on  high  heat.  Add  the  mustard  seeds,  as  soon  as  they  start  to  pop,  add  the  water  and  jaggery.   Bring  it  to  a  boil.  Throw  in  the  calyx  pieces,  salt.  Bring  the  heat  down  to  medium  and  stir  intermittently.  Add  the  grated  ginger.  Cook  till  the  Roselle  is  soft  and  the  water  is  almost  gone.

Squeeze  in  the  lemon  juice.

Enjoy  with  any  Parantha  (  Indian  flat  bread  ).  It  can  be  used  as  a  dip  or  even  as  a  topping  on  sandwiches.

Inside  Scoop;

I  haven’t  seen  these  in  any  local  markets.

Dried  organic  red  Roselle  is  available  in  Amazon.com

Here’s  a  link  to  Wiki  about  Roselle.