Mushurir dal (Red lentil soup)

By  Ratnatutorial session-376-3

Food  takes  centre  stage  anytime  I  talk  to  my  children. ‘This  has  been  a  very  busy  semester  Ma’,  they  tell  me.  I  know  what  it  means  in  terms  of  food.  Pot  noodles  and  coffee,  for  lunch,  supper,  snacks,  Thursday  or  Monday. ‘What  did  you  want  me  to  cook, when  you  are  here?’ I  would  ask  next.  Mentally  I  start  making  notes,  consult  the  cook  books  that  I  have.  Maybe  I  should  look  into   the  Biriyani  recipe  that  I  haven’t  tried  for  sometime,  or  I  should  step  away  from  the  Indian  food  and  venture  out  on  Pad  Thai  or  even  try  my  hands  on  baking  some  macaroons…..

I  clearly  remember  those  days  myself.  The  paper  notes  strewn  all  over  the  table, overflowing  onto  the  floor. The  new  geometric  design  on  the  wall,  made  entirely  from  different  colour  Post- its.  The  coffee  mug  balanced  precariously  on the  corner  of  the table  on  top  of  the  thick  note  book.  Many outside requests  of  help  to  “clean”  the room  was  strongly  turned  down.  To  dig out  the  green  highlighter  from  under  a  few  layers  of  papers  used  to  be  a  delicate  act  of  balancing.  What  appeared  as  the  height  of  anarchy  was  actually  my   way  of  arranging  things.  There  was  a   method  to  my  madness.

Analog has given way to digital.  No  Post-its  or  highlighters  these  days,  just  the  sleek  silhouette  of  the   MacBook  Air  on  the  table.  The  cravings  for  Dal-Bhat  has  not  changed  though.

“…Khali  Dal  Bhat  khete  chai  Ma.”  “I’d  only  like  to  have  Dalbhat  Ma.”  This  is  the  answer  I  get  everytime.  Just  Dal  and  Rice.  Nothing  fancy,  just  simple,  is  all  they  ask  for.

singlehanded-452-4

Lentils  are  a  staple  food  in  India.  Dal  Bhat  or  Lentil  Rice  is  common  in  parts  of  the  country  that  grows  rice.  Dal roti  or  Lentil  and  bread  for  the  wheat  growing  areas.  The  recipe  changes,  every  thirty  Kilometers,  they  say.  Almost  every  family  has  a  way  to  cook  them.  The  changes  may  be  very  subtle,  just  a  few  extra  spices  in  the  tadka  or  even  omission  of  a  few,  could  give  the  final  product  a  new  “look” or  taste  in  this  case.

Dal  was  never  thought  as  soup.  Lentil  soup  or  dal  soup  was  something  I  heard  only  after  moving  away  from  India.  Now  when  I  think  about  it,  it  can  very  well  be  a  soup.  Specially  in  the  prairie  winters,  I  can  never  say  no  to  a  bowl  of  piping  hot  goodness.  Any  thick  crusty  bread,  and  a  side  of  salad,  supper  is  served!

My children  like  the  lentil  and  rice  with  a  side  of  something  crunchy.  A  few  thick  cuts  of  shallot  or  a  couple  crispy  fried  poppadums  and  they  are  happy  campers.

tutorial session-372

Recipe;

Ingredients,

Mushur  Dal (  Split  red  lentils  )                  One  cup

Ghee                                                           One tbsp

Panch Phoron                                              One  quarter  tsp

Tomato                                                      One  large,  cut  in  small  cubes.

Ginger                                                       Half  inch  long,  finely  grated.

Green  chillies                                            A  couple  slit  length  wise.

Cilantro                                                      Chopped.  Two  tsps.

Salt                                                             To  taste.

Tomato ketchup                                          A  couple  squirts,  optional.

Method,

Boil  the  dal  with  water   and  turmeric  powder  in  a  saucepan.  I  usually  use  a  pressure  cooker.  Wait  for  only  one  whistle  and  let  it  cool  by  itself.  When  cooked  the  dal  changes  colour  to  yellow  and  becomes  mushy.  Keep  it  aside.

In  a  pan put  the  ghee, on  high  heat.  When  melted  add the  panch  phoron,  green  chillies  and  saute.  Just  when  the  mustard  seeds  from  the  panch  phoron  pop,  add  the  tomatoes.  Cook  till  they  are  mushy,  add this  mixture  to  the  dal.  Throw  in  the  grated  ginger,  salt  to  taste,  bring  it  to  boil  one  more  time  so  that  everything  mixes  well.

Garnish  with  the  chopped  cilantro  and  a  squirt  of  tomato  ketchup  if  you  want. Serve  either  with  rice  or  Naan  or  Roti.

tutorial session-379-3

Inside  Scoop:

Panch  phoron  is  a  combination  of  equal  parts  of  cumin  seeds,  nigella  seeds,  mustard  seeds,  fenugreek  seeds  and  fennel seeds. It  is  available  in  Indian grocery  stores  and  also  through  amazon.com

Tadka  is  a process  of  adding  some  herbs  to  a  bit  of  hot  oill,  then  adding  this  to  the  cooked  dish  for  extra  flavor.

Roasted Phool Makhana

singlehanded-555

Growing  up,  we  have  heard the  expression  “Dev  Anand  Jewel  thief  hai”  many  times.  What  could  be  the  big  deal,  I  often  wondered.  Dev  Anand  (  60s  Bollywood  star )  is  the  Jewel  thief,  goes  the  simple  translation.  It  was only  in  my  teenage  years,  that  my  Mejo  Kakima  trusted  me  with  the  family  secret.

Almost  every  summer  my  Jethamoshai  paid  us  a  visit.  Always  in  a  spotless white  shirt  and  Dhoti, he  frequently  used  his  very  stained  handkerchief  to  wipe  his  nose.  Inspite  of  cleaning  the  nose,  there  always  used  to  be  some  snuff  that  lingered  on  top  of  his  upper  lip,  giving  the  impression  that  he  sported  a  funny  moustache.  I  clearly  remember  the  summer, when  I  was  included  in  the  “elite”  group  in  the  family.  Mejo  Kakima  caught  my  attention,  then  moved  her  eyes  towards  Jethamoshai.  Without  saying  a  word  the  message  was  sent  out  ,  that  the  above  story  was  about  this  man.  I  was  so  proud  of  myself  then,  that  I  was  able  to  interpret  this .

  That   Jethamoshai  was  thrifty  was  common  knowledge.   Popcorn  was  unheard  of   in  movie  theatres  then.  Peanuts  roasted  and  dressed  with  lipsmacking  spices  used  to  be  sold  in  paper  cones.  Costing  not  more  than  a  few  cents,  people  didn’t  think  twice  about  treating  themselves  with  these  snacks.    Moong  Phali,  Moong  Phali   is  all  you  heard  during  intermission. The  story  goes  that  Jethamosai  went  to  theatres  to  watch  the  movie  “Jewel  Thief”  once. The  hawker  tried  his  best  to  persuade  my  Jethamoshai  to  buy  some  peanut  snacks..  It  didn’t  work.  Jethamoshai  did  not  budge.  The  hawker  then  decided  to  punish  him.  It  was  a  thriller  movie,  the  story  had  just  climaxed, everybody  was  eager  to  know  the  end  of  the  story. After  all  who  could  the  Jewel  thief  be  ?  Just  when   you  couldn’t  leave  your  seat,  and  wished  they  wouldn’t  even  stop  for  intermission.     Then,  at  that  moment  the  hawker  in  a  hushed  voice  spitted  those  few  words  “Dev  Anand  Jewel  thief  hai”,  in  my  Jethamoshai’s  ears  and  walked  off.  The  smooth  talking,  lead  actor  with  a  boyish  face,  was  in  fact  the  thief.  There….

singlehanded-549

Phool  Makhana  is  not  popcorn,  neither  is  it  sold  in  cinemas.  It  is in  fact  Lotus  seed  that  when  roasted,  puffs  up  just  like  the  popcorns  do.  It  is  also  known  as  Foxnut  or  Euryale  Ferox.   With  a  few  sprinkle  of  your  favourite  spices,  you  can  have  the  same  crunch  with  quite  a  few  health  benefits .  An  excellent  source  of  protein  and  calcium,  it  is  also  known  to  restore  the  body’s  vigour  and  delays  aging.

If  you  are  watching  the  Dufour-Lapointe   sisters  in  the  women’s  Moguls  skiing  event  in  Sochi  Olympics, or  Deepika  Padukone  in  the  Filmfare  awards,   keep  a  few  papercones  filled  with  Phool  makhana,  within  arm’s  reach.  You  might  even  be  looking  for  more.

Extra  butter  anybody?

singlehanded-565-3

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Phool  makana               One  packet  50  gms

Sea  salt                        To  taste

Turmeric  powder          One  fourth  tsp

Chilli  powder               One  fourth  tsp  (  Use  your  discretion  )

Cilantro                        One  tsp  finely  chopped.

Ghee                           One  tbsp

Chaat  masala             One  fourth  tsp

Lemon  juice                Half  tsp  (  optional  )

Method;

Take  ghee  on  a  frying  pan,  on  medium  heat.  When  the  ghee  melts  add  the  Phool  makhana,  saute  on  low  to  medium  heat  for  about  eight  to  ten  minutes. Throw  in  the  turmeric  and  chilli  powder,  sea  salt.  Put  the  gas  off.  Try  a  couple  when  its  not  too  hot.  It  should  be  crunchy  all  through  and  not  hard  inside. If  it  still  feels  hard  inside  saute  for  a  couple  minutes  more.  Add  the  cilantro,  chaat  masala   and  a  squeeze  of  lemon  juice,  if  you  prefer.

Make  papercones  and  stuff  these  inside.

Inside  Scoop:

Jethamoshai          Dad’s  elder  brother.

Mejo  Kakima         Dad’s  second  brother’s  wife.

Phool  makhana  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

Matarshutir kochuri

Fried bread with pea filling

By Ratna

tutorial session-084-2

There  is  the  black  dress  and  there  is  the  PJ.   It  is  customary  to  have  two  names  in  India.  The  one   from  the  birth  certificate,   is  the  official  name.  There  is  one  more  name,  which  is  used  only  at  home,  by  close  friends  and  family,  kind  of  the  “PJ”  of  names,  if  you  will.    One  cannot  address  elders  by  either  of  the  two  names  though!   A  generic  uncle  leaves  so  many  questions  unanswered.  So  kaku  is  dad’s  brother,  mamu  is  mum’s  brother.  Bawro,  Mejo,  Shejo   if  it  is  eldest,  second  or  third.  If  that  option  runs  out,  we  can  use  some  special  attribute  of  the  person,  Bhalo  mamu;  good  uncle.  It  can  be  his  work  like,  Daktar  kaku;  physician  uncle.  It  can  even  be  the  place  where  he  or  she  lives.  Londoner  Pishi,  Kolkatar  Dida.  Dad’s  sister  who  is  from  London  or  granma  who  lives  in  Kolkata.

tutorial session-052-3

I  had  a  Kolkatar  Dida.  My  Kolkatar  Dida.  She  was  my  Dida  and  not.  She  wasn’t  my  mum’s  mother.  She  was  her  Mamima,  her  mum’s  brother’s  wife  to  be  exact. ‘ Dekho,  bhitore   jeno   hawa   na  thake’,  make  sure  there  is  no  air  left  inside.  She  used  to  remind  me,  while  stuffing  the  Kochuri.  Her  deft  fingers  moving  swiftly,  measuring  the  exact  amount  of  filling   everytime   and  stuffing  them,  all  the  while,  her  gaze  fixed  on  my  novice  hand. The  winter  in  Kolkata  would  see  fresh  peas  in  the  grocery  stores.  There  were  many  fond  memories  made,  helping  Dida  make  Kochuris.

tutorial session-087-2

Proud  to  be  the  first  Bengali  women  trained  Librarian,  she  treated  the  spice  cabinet  of  her  kitchen  or  the  credenza  in  the  dining  room  the  same  as  the  books  in  her  library  at  work.  The  turmeric  jar  could  always  be  found  on  the  third  rack,  second  place  from  left.  You  could  pick  the  tea  cozy  from  the  top  right  drawer  of  the  credenza  blindfolded.

She  seemed  to  have  solutions  to  everything.  Moving  to  the  big  Metropolis  of  Kolkata  from  a  little  town  with  only  a  single  traffic  light,  I  was  always  scared  that  I  couldn’t  find  my  way  around.  “Keep  your  eyes  on  the  store  signboards  along  the  way,  they  have  the  adresses  clearly  written”,  she  said. Trivial  as  it  may  sound  today,  it  used  to  be  a  challenge  back  then.   The  daily  commute  to  University  from  Dida’s  house  used  to  take  a  good  three  quarters  of  an  hour  by  the  city  bus,  in  rush  hour.  “Office  time”  as  they  called  it.  I  learnt  that  Gariahat  road  turned  into  Rashbihari  Avenue,  Southern  Avenue  joined  the  Aushutosh  Mukherjee road.

Weekends  would  be  spent  enjoying  good  food  or  movie.  If  that  meant  we  had  to  travel  all  the  way  to  the  north  side  of  the  city  to  ‘Putiram’s’,  to  enjoy  their  famous  sweets,  so  be  it.  An  Uttam-Suchitra  movie,  ( romantic  Bengali  star  duo  ),  had  to  be  seen.  A  Bengali  woman  should  be  perfectly  adept  to  discuss  the   the  latest  live  theatre  production  of  Tripti  Mitra,  to  learning  the  subtleties  of  a  Bengali  kitchen.  It  didn’t  matter  if  your  course  work  was  due  the  next  week.  Being  a  well  rounded  person  was  far  more  important  to  her  than  a  geek.

tutorial session-085-2

I  was  in  Kolkata  last  year  about  this  time,  after  a  few  years.  It  was  the  same  familiar  place.

DSC_0491

DSC_0559

The  boxy  yellow  cabs,  the  new  bridge  over  the  river  ‘Ganga’,  the  neon  pink  Bougainvellias  draping  the  whitewashed  walls  of  my  Dida’s  house,  the  canopy  of  green  leaves  every  which  way  your  eyes  could  see.

DSC_0582DSC_0504

The  unfamiliarity  inside  the  house   was  striking.  While  I  sat  in the  drawing  room , it  felt  like  Dida  was  busy  in  the  kitchen,  when  I  walked   in  the  bedroom ,  it  felt  Dida  would  emerge  from  the  bathroom  with  a  towel  wrapped  around  her  long  hair.  She  didn’t.  My  Kolkatar  Dida  is  no  more.

Recipe:  Makes ten kochuris

Ingredients;

For  the  filling,

Frozen  peas               One  cup  measure.  Thawed.

Ginger                         Three  quarter  inch.

Green  chillies               Two,  use  your  discretion

Asafoetida                    One  quarter  of  a  tsp

Salt  to  taste

For  the  bread  (  dough  or shell  ):

All  purpose  flour  or  Maida    One  and half cup

Canola  oil                              One  Tbsp  for  the  dough.   More  for  frying.

Salt                                        One  quarter  tsp.

Method;

Filling,

Grind  the  peas , ginger  and  chillies  together  using  very  little  water.  Put  a  nonstick  pan  on  medium  high  heat.  Add  two  tsps  canola  oil.  When  hot,  throw  in  the  Asafoetida.  Stir  for  half  a  minute,  there’ll  be  a  nutty  aroma.    Add  the  ground  filling  mixture . Saute  till  there  is  no  water  left  behind  and  the  colour  has  changed  to  a  hint  of  brown.  Put  the  gas  off,  and  keep  it  aside  to  cool.  Make   small  balls  when  you  can  handle  them.

For  the  shell,

Combine  the  flour,  salt  and  oil  in  a  bowl  and  mix  with  fingers  untill  it  feels  crumbly,  like  making  a  pastry  dough.  Mix  water  a  bit  at  a  time  to  make  a  firm  dough.  Divide  into  small  balls.  Cover  with  a  wet  towel,  let  it  rest  for  half  hour.

To  assemble,  take  a  dough  flatten  it  between  the  palm  of  your  hands  to  about  an  inch  and  a  half  in  diameter.  With  the  first  finger  and  thumb  of  your  right  hand,  pinch  the  edge  all  the  way,  to  make  it  thinner.  Cup  the  left  hand  with  the  flattened  dough  in  it  and  seat  the  filller  in.  Seal  the  edges  of  the   pastry, start  with  right  hand  side  using  the  first  finger  and  thumb  again  slowly  moving  to  the  left,  making  sure  there  is  no  air  trapped  in.  Give  a  good  round  shape  and  let  it  rest  for  a  few  minutes.  Sprinkle  a  few  drops  of  oil  on  the  countertop, to  prevent  the  dough  from  sticking to  the  rolling  pin.  Flatten  the  filled  dough  using  both  hands  so  that  you  have  to  roll less.  Now  carefully  roll  it  into  a  round  shape  about  two  and  a  half  inch  in  diameter.  Deep  fry  both  sides,  till  very  light  yellow  colour.  Collect  them  on  paper  towels  to  get  rid  of  the  extra  oil.

Serve  them  with  any  light  vegetable.  Aloor  dawm,  (recipe  coming  later),  is  the  dish  of  choice.  In  my  household,  we  prefer  with  pickles  or  with  no  side  at  all.

Inside  scoop;

It  does  need  some  practise,  to  roll  them  into  perfect  circles,  just  like  anything  else.  Please  do  not  get  discouraged  if  it  doesn’t  work  out  the  first  time.

There  are  many  variations  to  the  filling,  we  like  with  minimum  spices  to  get  the   sweet  taste  of  peas  as  is.

I  used  frozen  peas  for convenience.  In  Dida’s  house  we  shelled  the  fresh  peas  then  steamed  them.

I  usually  keep it  for  my  cheat  days.  Can’t  avoid  deep  fried  stuff  altogether,  can  we?

Easy stuffed Dates

By  Ratna.

tutorial session-357

I  am  not  an  outdoor  person.  I  prefer  sitting  with  a  cup  of  hot  tea  and  gazing  out  through  the  window.  No  snowboarding  or  icehockey   here.

DSC_0354

DSC_0389

Bloghopping  is  my  favourite  past  time  these  days.  Who  would’nt  like  to  travel  from  Israel  to  India,  Texas  to  Turkey  with  a  click  of  your  mouse.  Visit  a  virtual  friend,  listen  to  their  stories,  take  a  peek  at  what’s  cooking  in  their  kitchen,  feast  with  your  eyes  at  the  beautiful  pictures.  Wouldn’t  you  agree  its  easier  than  losing  your  suitcase,  flights  not  taking  off, or  oh  don’t  forget,  the  slippery  road  conditions.  I  have  gone  a  step  further.  At  the  end  of  another  bloggers post,  it  asked  to  leave  a  comment  regarding  some  food,  which  I  did.  No  double  Jeopardy  questions  or  complex  mathematical  solutions.  Just  a  comment.  I  got  an  email  a  few  days  later  that  I  was  the  winner!  Note  to  self –  remember  to  buy  the  Lotto  max  tickets.

tutorial session-277

As  promised  in  the  post  I  received  a  set  of  cheese  boards  with  cutters  and  best  of  all  Brie  cheese  from  Castello.  Thank  you  “Keep  Calm  And  Eat  On”.  The  timing  couldn’t  have  been  better, as  I  recently  found  an  interesting  recipe  in  the  December  issue  of  Chatelaine  magazine.  Does  this  scenario  sound  familiar:  guests  are  arriving  soon,  still  not  sure  about  the  appetizers… or  a  last  minute  potluck  notice  at  work,  in  the  middle  of  the  week.  With  just  a  few  things  in  hand  you  can  change  a  disaster  to  a  winner.

tutorial session-293-2

tutorial session-352-2

Recipe:

Ingredient;

Mejdool  Dates                About 10

Brie  Cheese                  One  small packet  125  gms

Pistachio  nuts               Handful

Garlic                            One  Clove  coarsely  chopped

Rosemary  leaves         A  couple  shredded.  (Optional)

Honey                         One Tbsp

Method;

Preheat  the  oven  to  350  degrees  F.  Cut  the  dates  in  half  lengthwise  and  take  the  stone  out.  Keep  them  aside.  Unwrap  the  Brie.  Take  a  sharp  knife  and  make  a  cut  about  3 mm  from  the  periphery,  all  the  way  round.  Now  scoop  the  rind  off  from  the  top.  We  have  now  created  a  ‘moat’.  Seat  this  in  an  ovenproof  bowl.  Dump  the  honey,  nuts  and  garlic  in  it.  Sprinkle  with  a  few  cut  pieces  of  the  rosemary  leaf.  Cover  the bowl  with  aluminium  foil.  Bake  at  350  degrees  F  for  about  40-45  mts.  Scoop  up  this  mixture  of  melted  cheese  with  nuts  etc  and  fill  up  the  date  halves.  Arrange  them  on  a  tray  or  platter.  Welcome  your  guests  with  a  big  smile!

Inside  Scoop;

All  amounts  can  be  adjusted  as  per  taste. I  prefer  the  gooey  cheese  hence  I  melted  it  in  the  oven.  The  recipe  in  the  magazine  called  for  goat  cheese  and  pecan  nuts.  I  added  the  crushed  garlic,  which  I  thought  cut  the  sweetness  of  almost  everything  else.  It  took  very  little  time  from  start  to  finish.

Make Ghee, the sacred ingredient

By Ratna.DSC_0948

It  has  been  cold.  Very  cold.  The  temperature  inside  the  freezer  is  warmer  than  the  outside  temperature. The  days  very  short  and  very  white.  Snowfall  in  the  last  two  months  has  exceeded  that  of  the  whole  season .  The  night  seems  to  come  very  fast.

I  lit  a  lamp  with  ghee.  Lighting  a  lamp  signifies  the  passage   from  ignorance  to  knowledge.  Special  days  are  always  marked  by  lighting  a  lamp,  not  by  putting it  off.  Today  is  special.  The  first  day  of  a  brand  new  year.  It  holds  promise  for  the  whole  year.  Ghee  or  Ghrit  is  a  sacred  ingredient  because  of  its  purity.

DSC_0966

Ayurveda  puts  ghee  as  the  best  cooking  medium.  It is also  known  as  clarified  butter and  holds  a  special  place  in  Indian  lifestyle.  Clarifying  the  butter  of  its  proteins  , leaves  only  the  fat  behind .  Ghee  has  the  highest  smoking  point  among  other  oils.tutorial session-201

.

Ghee  can  be  very  easily  prepared  at  home.  It  is  a  beautiful  dark  golden  liquid  when  warm, and  changes  to  a  soft  fudge  like  consistency  when  let  to  stand.  Keeping  it  inside  the  fridge  will  harden  it.  I  recently  read  that  aged  ghee  matured  between  ten  to one  hundred  years  is  called  ‘  kumbhaghrit  ‘,  and  that  of   even  older  vintage  is  ‘  mahaghrit  ‘.  Mature  ghee  is  believed  to  have  rejuvenating  qualities.

DSC_0362

We  use  ghee  either  as  a   cooking  medium  or  it  is  added  in  the  end of  a recipe  along  with  some  spices  for  a  fantastic  flavour.  This  is  called  “Tadka”  or  “Chaunk”.

DSC_0982DSC_0996

Although  the  days  are  short,  we  just  passed  the  winter  solistice.  We  may  not  feel  it  yet  but  the  days  have  started  to  be  longer.  Its   like  when  a  new  life  grows  inside  you,  things  will  be  different  down  the  road.  Spring  will  be  here.  There  is  hope.

I  wish  you,  you  and  you  a  great  new  year.

I  wish  you  good  health  and  lot  of  happiness.

May  you  always  have  that  smile  on  your  face..

Recipe;

Ingredients;

Unsalted  butter      1  lb

Method;

Take  the  slab  of  butter  in  a  deep  bottom  pan  on  high  heat.  Wait  till  the  butter  melts  and  start  to  boil.  Bring  the  heat  down  to  low  and  let  the  liquid  simmer.  You  will  notice  a  layer  of  scum  forming  on  top.  Lift  a  ladlful  of  liquid  and  check  the  colour  .It  should  be  light  brown.  The  house  will  be  filled  with  a  heavenly  aroma,  something  like  caramel.  Put  the  gas  off.  Drain  the  liquid  through  a  cheesecloth.  Discard  the  solids.  Collect  the  Ghee  in  a  clean,  dry  container.


Inside  Scoop;

Take  a  deep  bottom  pan  to  make   ghee.  It  can  spill  out  pretty  fast.  Ask  me  how  I  know!

Always  use  dry  spoon  to  take   the  ghee  out  from  its  bottle.

Do  not  leave  the  burning  lamp  unattended.

Please  do  not  multitask,  when  preparing  ghee.  Make  it  into  a  relaxing  chore.

Don’t  forget,  Ghee  is  pure  fat.  It   does’nt   take  too  long  to  tip  the   scale  to  the  side  that  you  do  not  want .

Lebu pata diye Salmon Tottora (Salmon in Tomato Gravy)

Salmon  Tottora  with  lime  leaf.

By  RatnaDSC_0721-3

She  had  never  cooked  salmon  Tottora.  In  fact  she  had  never  cooked  salmon  in  her  life.  Ilish,  Rui,  Katla,  Chitol,  Phansa,  Chingri   were  the  ones  she  was  familiar  with.  She  cooked   jhal,  jhol,  kalia,  paturi,  awmbol   and  of  course  tottora.  Dida’s   white  sari  always  had  a  red  color  in  the  border,  indicating  that  my  Dadu  was  still  living .

Every  summer,  as  soon  as  the  school  holidays  begun,  we  used  to  visit  our  Dadu  and  Dida.  The  days  would  be  lazy,  revolving  between  eat  and  play.  The  highlight , of  course  would  be  the  evening,  when  my  Dadu  would  tell us  stories.  He  would  sit  on  the  corner  of  his  bed  surrrounded  by  his  grandchildren.  It used  to  be  very  hot,  even  after  sunset   and  the  big  window  next  to  his  bed  was  left    open  to  let    some  fresh  air  in.  How  many  times  did  we  hear  the  story  of  this  man  in  his  village,  who  was  travelling  on  a  big  steam  boat.  In  one  of  the  port  of  calls,  you  could  disembark  to  have  supper  in  one  of  the  small  eateries.  Fish  curry  and  rice  used  to  be  what  our  friend   had  ordered.  By  the time  he  was  half  done  his  food,  however,  it  was  time  for  the  steam  boat  to  leave.  I  can  still  remember  the  tension  we  all  had,  can  he  still  make  it  back  to  the  boat  or  not.  The  boat  was  sounding  its  foghorn,  at  this  time  Dadu  would  put  his  right  palm  sideways  to  his  mouth,  his  two  cheeks   blown  out  full  to  make  a  “Vu  Vu”,  sound  to  mimick  the  foghorn.  The  left  arm  wrapped    around   the  youngest  grandchild  who  sat  on  his  lap.  Then  he  would  suddenly  stop  the  story,  as  if  he  could  visualise   something  in  his  mind’s  eye.  “Dadu,  tarpor   ki   holo?”  Granpa,  what  happened  then,  we  said  in  unision.  Could  he  or  could  he  not,  our  friend,  was  he  able  to  make  it  back  to  the  steamboat ?  Not  that  we  did  not  know  the  end  of  the  story,  but  everytime   felt  like  first  time,  such  was  his  ability  to  mesmerise   his  listeners.

Collage

 

We  never  asked  what  he  thought  then.  We  were  too  young  to  let  somebody  else’s  pain , come  between  our  pleasure.  Dadu  and  his  brothers with  their  families  lived    as  a  joint  family   together,  in  their  house,  which  sat  on  a  good  few  acres   of  land.  The  land  was  dotted  with  mango,  jackfruit,  pomegranate,  coconut   and  other  fruit  trees.  The  star  was  the  lime   tree  though.  They  were  the  most  fragrant  limes  ” Gondhoraaj  lebu”   he  said  with  pride,  emphasizing  the  ‘a’  in  Raaj,  ‘the  King  of  fragrance’,  as  it  would  translate  in  English.   It  wasn’t  only  the  fruits  that  were  scented  but  also  the  leaves .    Pinching   the  corner  of  the  leaf,  would  leave  the  heady  scent  on  the  fingers   for  a  long  time.

The  country  was  then  divided,  and  they  were  forced  to  leave  their  house  forever,  in  moments  notice.  They  walked  for  days  together,  with  a  small bag  in  one  hand,  carrying  all  their  possession  now  and  the  other  hand  tucked  tightly to  the  fingers  of  his  young  son.  They  were  refugees   in  the  newly  divided  country.   Just  think  for  a  moment.  Try.   Not  only  they  had  no idea  of  where  they  were  going,  what  would  they  do  for  a  living,  they  did  not  know  what  happened  to  all  the  cows  that  they  left  behind.  Did  the  newborn  calf  make  it?  What  happened  to  the  beautiful  garden?  The  fruit  trees  bent  with  the  weight  of  the  fruits.  Most  importantly  what  happened  to  the  prized  lime  tree?

DSC_0817

Nobody  knows,  for  when  these  questions  came  to  my  mind,  there  were  nobody  left  to  give  the  answers.  Dadu  and  Dida  were  long  gone.  They  will  always  live  in  my  memory  though  and  in  this  recipe.  From  when  I  pluck  the  leaves  from  my  limetree   to  when  the  Tottora   hits  my  palate,  I  so  vividly  recollect  the  story. The  lime   leaves  bring  an  ever  so  slight  citrusy taste,  balancing  the  sweetness  of  the  tomatoes  and  the  heat  of  the  chillies,  just  like  an  experienced  juggler.

DSC_0727-2

This  is  my  go-to  fish  dish.  Packed  with  heart  healthy  oils,  you   never   need  to  feel   guilty,  even  if   you  feel   like   overeating.

Recipe:

Ingredients:

Salmon:  I  bought  Fillet  from  Costco, about  2.2  lbs. .  Cut  into  one  and  half  inches  square.

Onions:  Two  large.  Finely  chopped.

Tomatoes:  Two  large.  Cut  in  small  pieces.

Turmeric  Powder:  Two  tsps

Chilli  Powder:  I  used  two  tsps.  Use  your  discretion.

Salt:  To  taste.

Mustard  oil:  Two  tsps

Lime  leaves:  Five  or  six.

Canola  oil:  One  and  half  tbsps.

Green  Chillis:  Two  (optional)

Tomato  Ketchup;  One tbsps

Method:

Add  the  turmeric  powder  and  one  tsps  salt  to  the  cut  fish  and  set  aside.

Take  the  canola  oil  in  a  wok  over  medium  heat.  When  hot  throw  in  the  onions.  Saute  till  very  light  brown  colour. About  five  minutes.  Add  the  fish.  The  fish  should  be  fried  lightly  on  both  sides. Around  seven  to  eight   minutes  total . Just  untill  it  starts  to  change  colour.  Add  the  tomatoes and  chilli  powder.  Cook  till  the  tomatoes  are  mushy  and  the  spices  seem  to  separate  from  oil.  Or  things  are  drying  up  in  the  wok.  Add  one  and  half  cups  of  water  and  the  tomato  ketcup.  When  starting  to  boil  add   salt,  according  to  your  taste .  Cover  and  cook  till  the  fish  is  done  and  all  the  tomatoes  and  spices  have  come  together.

Turn  the  gas  off.  Add  the  lime  leaves  and  green  chillis.  Drizzle  the  mustard  oil,  serve  hot  with  Basmati  rice.

Inside Scoop:

Ilish,  Rui,  Katla,  Phansa,  Chitol,  Chingri:  Name  of  different  river  fishes  commonly  found  in  Bengal.

Jhal,  Jhol,  Kalia,  Paturi,  Awmbol,  Tottora:  Diffrent  ways  of  cooking  fish.

Dadu:  Granpa

Dida:  Granma

Frozen  lime  leaves  are  available  from  Asian  food  store.  The  packet  that  I  have  is  a  product  of  Thailand. I  resort  to  plucking  leaves  from  my  baby  lime  plant  only  if  I’m  out  of  the  frozen  ones.  If  you’re   lucky  and  living  in  a  tropical  paradise,  go  ahead,  get  it  fresh  from  your  yard!

Be  very  gentle  turning  the  fish.

Apologies  for  the  quality  of  some  of  the  BW  pictures.

Rusbhari Malai Handi (Gooseberry Cheesecake Pot)

Gooseberry   Cheesecake  pot

By  RatnaDSC_0867

It  did’nt  matter  whether  we  ordered  Filet  de  truite  fraiche  aux,  Bouillabaisse,       or  Tarte  Normande,  all  the  dishes  in  this  exquisite  French  restaurant   L’Heritage  came  with  a  final  touch,  a  crowning  glory  so  to  speak,  an  orange  berry  on  top. This  is  no  ordinary  berry  though.  Just  like  a  candy  in  its  wrap,  this  little  orange  berry  has  a  dainty  strawlike  calyx  .I  held  the  little  stem  with  my  finger  and  dug  my  teeth   in,   to  pluck  the  berry.  A  little  sweet  a  little  tart,  I  was  always  intrigued  by  this  fruit.  Such  was  my  attachment  with  this  berry , that  my  friends  and  family  have  more  than  once  given  up  their  share  to me.

On  a  recent  visit  to  my  SIL  in  India,  I  had  a  de  ja  vue.  Devi  my  SIL,  herself  an  award  winning  cook,  always   looks  for  ways  to  include  local  and  seasonal  veggies  and  fruits  in  her  cooking.  ‘Kisher  chutney  banali?’,  What  did  you  make  the  chutney  with,  I  ask  her,  after  giving  up  on  the  guessing  game.  Surely  the  sweet  and  tart  taste  with  the  familiar  chutney  spices,  were  all  pointing  towards  a  fruit.  But  which  one?  ‘Rusbhari’  she  said  matter-of-factly.  She  dose’nt  mean  Raspberry,  does  she?  The  colour  was  far  from ‘ Raspberry.’  Try  saying  Rusbhari  a  few  times,  dose’nt  it  sound  like  Raspberry?  In  as  much  as  I  was  itching  to  find  out  about  the  mystery  ingredient,  anymore  discussion  at  that  point  would  only  undermine  her  knowledge  about  Raspberry.

Gooseberries  and  Oranges

Gooseberries and Oranges
By Ratna

DSC_0744

After  a  brief  break,  I  see  my  brother -in-law  returning  with  a  small  packet  in  his  hand.  ‘There  you  go,  more  Rusbharis  for  you’  he  said.  As  he  put  the  shopping  on  the  table,  imagine  my  surprise  when  I  see  the  little  orange  berries  right  in  front  of  me.  A  few  of  them  were  tied  together  with  an  elastic  band.  The  calyxes  were  pulled  behind,  as  if  sporting  a  pony  tail !   I  was  like  a  kid  in  a  candy  store.  No,  I  didnt  gobble  them  down,  but  held  them  very  softly,  turned  them  over,  opened  the  elastic  bands,  tried  to  put  the  calyxes   back,  as  if  to  relieve  them  of  the  pain  from  a  tight  ponytail.  Then  came  the  camera,  I  tried  them  in  landscape  and   portrait  mode,  single  and  in  bunches,  flat  on  the  table and  in  glass  containers.  Not  sure  what  to  make  out  of  this    Rusbhari-love   of  mine,  my  brother-in-law,  pointed  his  finger  to  the  open  window,  as  if  even  uttering  a  word  would  dilute  the situation.  As  I  look  out  of  the  window,  I  see  a  man  with  a  wooden  cart  selling  something.  A  closer  look,  I  see  a  sea  of  Rusbharis   spread  out  on  the cart.  Here   was  the  berry  that  we  got  one  per  plate  in  the  restaurant.  It  is  being  sold  in  kilos!   I  can  surely  justify  Devi’s  decision  of   making  chutney  with  this  berry.

DSC_0849DSC_0738

‘Juicefilled ‘  would  be  the  literal  translation  in  English.  Cape  gooseberry  or  Physalis  peruviana    were  some  of  the  other  names.

DSC_0856

Very  recently,  I  saw  them  in  small  plastic  bushels  holding  about  ten  or  twelve  gooseberries  in  them,  in  my  local  grocery  store.  After  doing  the  happy  dance,  I  bought  a  couple  bushels.  I  knew  I  was  not  making  chutney,  I  wanted  to  relish  them  as  they  were with  minimum  cooking.  I  liked  this  idea  of  strawberry  cheesecake  pot  that  I  saw  in  Kirstie  Allsupp’s  video.   Why  dont  I  recreate  the  same  using  the  gooseberries?

DSC_0889

I  can  safely  say  you  won’t  be  disappointed. As  you  dig  the  spoon  in  the  cheesecake  pot,  to  include  a  bit  of  the  cut  berries,  the  layer  of cheese,  the  crunchy  biscuit  pieces  with  a  bite  or  two  of  the  almond  sliver,  there  is  a  medley  of  tastes.  The  sweet  and  soft  cheese  layer  melts  in  the  mouth,  giving  way  to  the  little  berry  pieces,  and  finally  the  chewy  bits  of  the  nuts ,  berry  seeds   and  biscuits.  .   I  must  admit  my  spoon  did  not  leave  any  evidence  of  the  cheesecake  being  in  the  pot.

DSC_0901-2Recipe:

Ingredients;

Light  Digestive  biscuits.  Peek  Freans            12

Low  fat  Greek  yoghurt.                                  150  gms

Extra  light  soft  cheese,                                   150  gms

Light  condensed  milk  .Carnation.                     Half tin.  200 gms

Lemon  juice                                                   From  one  lemon

Fresh  gooseberries                                        250  gms.

Almond  slivers                                              Handful

Method;

Crumble  the  biscuits  with  your  finger.  I  put  two  biscuits  in  each  tumbler.I  had  six  tumblers  in  all.

Place  the condensed  milk  into  a  bowl  and  add  lemon  juice. Stir  together  untill  the  mixture  has  thickened.  Whisk  the  cream  cheese  and  yoghurt  in  a  small  bowl  untill  smooth  then  fold  in  the  thickened  condensed  milk.  Spoon  the  creamy  mixture  over  the  biscuits.  Chill  for  atleast  30  minutes  to  an  hour.

Chop  the  berries. Add   about  two  tablespoon  of  the  cut  berries  to  the  cheesecake.  Throw  in  a  few  slivers  of  almonds  and  garnish  with  a  whole  berry  on  top  to  serve.

Inside  Scoop;

SIL            Sister-in-law

I  was  left  with  some  of  the  cheese  mixture,  You  can  be  generous  with  portioning  this.