Lentil and Onion Pakora

By Ratnalentil  and  onion  pakora-708-2

It  snowed  again.  The  big  flakes  came  down  fast,  as  if  a   paper  shredder  had  been  emptied.   We  were  spoilt  with  a  bit  of  good  weather  for  the  last  few  days  and  got  carried  away.   We  opened  the  windows  and  let  the  fresh  air  in  after  four  months.  Severed  relationship  altogether  with  the  heavy  parka.  Felt  the  steering  wheel  with  bare  hands.  Why  even  the  Calendar  announced  the  first  day  of  spring!  Oh  well,  we  know  better  than  that  in  the  prairies.  April  will  bring  more  snow.  May  hasn’t  been  out  of  bounds  for  snow  either  for  some  years. To  go  with  this  cold  weather  I  made  these  crispy  onion  Pakoras.

spring-701

I  read  with  interest  about  the  ”  Lentil  Recipe  Revelation  Challenge“.  My  blogger  friend  from  ” Keep  calm  and  eat  on   invited  us  to  join  it.  Coming  from  a  similar  background  in  India,  where   lentils  are  part  of   our  diet   24/7/365,  I  couldn’t  let  this  go  by  me  unchallenged.  In  fact  not  too  long  back  I  wrote  about  a  lentil  soup  here  . This  is  my  entry  for  ”  Best  in  the  appetizer ”  category.  It  was  lot  of  fun.  There  still  is  time  in  case  you  want  to  be  part  of  this  project.

Pakoras  are  usually  made  from  Besan  or  gram  flour.  Sometimes  rice  flour  is  added.  I  have  substituted  red  lentil  paste  in  place  of  the  rice  flour  to  give  the   pakoras  more  colour  and  crispiness.  Just  what  you  want  with  this  weather!

People  often  shy  away  from  Indian  Cooking  because  the  ingredients  list  runs  for  a  page  and  a  half.  I  am  on  a  mission  here.  For  this  challenge  I  have  made  a  point  to  use  the   minimum  number  of  ingredients.  Try  this  recipe  and  you  will  be  surprised  with  the  results.  I  have  put  the  difficulty  rating  for  this  recipe  as  “child’s  play”.  The  other  two  being  “knew  I  could  do  that” and  “evil’.

If  you  are  lucky  enough  to  be  enjoying  a  beautiful  warm  spring  day,  even  better.  Maybe  you  have  planned  an  afternoon  with  family  and  friends  barbecuing.  The  freshly  cut  green  grass  tickling  your  bare  feet,  children  on  the  trampoline  and  Fido  catching  his  breath  with  his  tongue  hanging  out.  The  noise  of  the  neighbour’s  lawnmower  in  the  background.  You  bring  out  a  batch  of  these  freshly  fried  pakoras.  Friends  do  you  feel  your  fingers  are  ready  to  grab  one,  like  the  ones  we  see  in  the  picture?

Have  I  been  able  to  entice  you  with  the  story?  In  the  virtual  world  of  “Challenges”,  for  these  pakoras  to  see  the  light  of  the  day,  I  need  your  help. Please  leave  a  comment  below,  telling  me  your  thoughts.  If  you’ve  tried  them already,  were  they  yummy?

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Onion                               One  medium,  finely  chopped

Gram Flour  (  Besan  )    One  cup

Red  Lentils                      Half  cup

Cilantro                             Roughly  chopped , Half  cup

Baking  Soda                   Half  tsp

Salt                                   One  and  half  tsp,  and  another  tsp  to  sprinkle.

Chilli  powder                    One  quarter  tsp  (  optional  )

Asafoetida   (  hing  )           Small  pinch  (  optional )

Canola  oil                           For  deep  frying

Method;

Wash  and  soak  the  red  lentils  for  couple  of  hours.  Grind  it  in  a  paste  with  very  little  water.

In  a  bowl  mix  the  Gram  flour  and  baking  soda.  Add  all  the  other  ingredients,  next.  The  mixture  should  be  thick,  but  pliable.  I  did  not  have  to  add  extra  water.  The  water  that  I  added  to  grind  the  lentils  was  sufficient.  If  you  feel  add  very  little  water.

Heat  canola  oil  in  a  wok  on  high  heat. I  took  a  big  wok  and  filled  it  with  oil,  two  inches  deep.  Put  a   little  bit  of  the  batter  to  check  if  the  oil  is  ready.  The  batter  should  rise  up  to  the  surface  right away.  Turn  the  gas  to  medium  now.  With  your  finger  take  about  “loonie”  size  batter  and  carefully  dip  in  the  oil.  Do  not  overcrowd,  about  six  or  seven  in  a  batch  will  do.  The  batter  need  not  be  formed  into  a  round  ball.  The  little  unevenness  actually  makes  the  onion  pakora  more  appealing.  Turn  the  gas  lower  now,  between  medium  and  low.  The  pakora  has  to  cook  even.  If  the  gas  is  on  high,  it   will  only  cook  on  the  outside,  the  inside  remaining  uncooked.  When  the  colour  changes  to  golden  brown,  remove  them  on  paper  towels.  Sprinkle  a  little  more  salt on  them  now.

Serve   them  with  Tomato  ketchup  and/or  mustard  sauce.  This  is  what  my  family  prefers.  Any  sauce  can  be  used.

In  a  snowy  day  I’d  serve  them  with  a  hot  cup  of  tea.  This  is  such  a  versatile  dish,  you  can  enjoy  it  as  much  on  a  hot  summer  day  too.  I’d  probably  then  change  the  drink  to  a  cold  one….

Inside  Scoop;

Gram  flour  or  Besan  is  available  in  the  World  food  section  in  Superstore.

Asafoetida  or  Hing  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  store.

 

Mushurir dal (Red lentil soup)

By  Ratnatutorial session-376-3

Food  takes  centre  stage  anytime  I  talk  to  my  children. ‘This  has  been  a  very  busy  semester  Ma’,  they  tell  me.  I  know  what  it  means  in  terms  of  food.  Pot  noodles  and  coffee,  for  lunch,  supper,  snacks,  Thursday  or  Monday. ‘What  did  you  want  me  to  cook, when  you  are  here?’ I  would  ask  next.  Mentally  I  start  making  notes,  consult  the  cook  books  that  I  have.  Maybe  I  should  look  into   the  Biriyani  recipe  that  I  haven’t  tried  for  sometime,  or  I  should  step  away  from  the  Indian  food  and  venture  out  on  Pad  Thai  or  even  try  my  hands  on  baking  some  macaroons…..

I  clearly  remember  those  days  myself.  The  paper  notes  strewn  all  over  the  table, overflowing  onto  the  floor. The  new  geometric  design  on  the  wall,  made  entirely  from  different  colour  Post- its.  The  coffee  mug  balanced  precariously  on the  corner  of  the table  on  top  of  the  thick  note  book.  Many outside requests  of  help  to  “clean”  the room  was  strongly  turned  down.  To  dig out  the  green  highlighter  from  under  a  few  layers  of  papers  used  to  be  a  delicate  act  of  balancing.  What  appeared  as  the  height  of  anarchy  was  actually  my   way  of  arranging  things.  There  was  a   method  to  my  madness.

Analog has given way to digital.  No  Post-its  or  highlighters  these  days,  just  the  sleek  silhouette  of  the   MacBook  Air  on  the  table.  The  cravings  for  Dal-Bhat  has  not  changed  though.

“…Khali  Dal  Bhat  khete  chai  Ma.”  “I’d  only  like  to  have  Dalbhat  Ma.”  This  is  the  answer  I  get  everytime.  Just  Dal  and  Rice.  Nothing  fancy,  just  simple,  is  all  they  ask  for.

singlehanded-452-4

Lentils  are  a  staple  food  in  India.  Dal  Bhat  or  Lentil  Rice  is  common  in  parts  of  the  country  that  grows  rice.  Dal roti  or  Lentil  and  bread  for  the  wheat  growing  areas.  The  recipe  changes,  every  thirty  Kilometers,  they  say.  Almost  every  family  has  a  way  to  cook  them.  The  changes  may  be  very  subtle,  just  a  few  extra  spices  in  the  tadka  or  even  omission  of  a  few,  could  give  the  final  product  a  new  “look” or  taste  in  this  case.

Dal  was  never  thought  as  soup.  Lentil  soup  or  dal  soup  was  something  I  heard  only  after  moving  away  from  India.  Now  when  I  think  about  it,  it  can  very  well  be  a  soup.  Specially  in  the  prairie  winters,  I  can  never  say  no  to  a  bowl  of  piping  hot  goodness.  Any  thick  crusty  bread,  and  a  side  of  salad,  supper  is  served!

My children  like  the  lentil  and  rice  with  a  side  of  something  crunchy.  A  few  thick  cuts  of  shallot  or  a  couple  crispy  fried  poppadums  and  they  are  happy  campers.

tutorial session-372

Recipe;

Ingredients,

Mushur  Dal (  Split  red  lentils  )                  One  cup

Ghee                                                           One tbsp

Panch Phoron                                              One  quarter  tsp

Tomato                                                      One  large,  cut  in  small  cubes.

Ginger                                                       Half  inch  long,  finely  grated.

Green  chillies                                            A  couple  slit  length  wise.

Cilantro                                                      Chopped.  Two  tsps.

Salt                                                             To  taste.

Tomato ketchup                                          A  couple  squirts,  optional.

Method,

Boil  the  dal  with  water   and  turmeric  powder  in  a  saucepan.  I  usually  use  a  pressure  cooker.  Wait  for  only  one  whistle  and  let  it  cool  by  itself.  When  cooked  the  dal  changes  colour  to  yellow  and  becomes  mushy.  Keep  it  aside.

In  a  pan put  the  ghee, on  high  heat.  When  melted  add the  panch  phoron,  green  chillies  and  saute.  Just  when  the  mustard  seeds  from  the  panch  phoron  pop,  add  the  tomatoes.  Cook  till  they  are  mushy,  add this  mixture  to  the  dal.  Throw  in  the  grated  ginger,  salt  to  taste,  bring  it  to  boil  one  more  time  so  that  everything  mixes  well.

Garnish  with  the  chopped  cilantro  and  a  squirt  of  tomato  ketchup  if  you  want. Serve  either  with  rice  or  Naan  or  Roti.

tutorial session-379-3

Inside  Scoop:

Panch  phoron  is  a  combination  of  equal  parts  of  cumin  seeds,  nigella  seeds,  mustard  seeds,  fenugreek  seeds  and  fennel seeds. It  is  available  in  Indian grocery  stores  and  also  through  amazon.com

Tadka  is  a process  of  adding  some  herbs  to  a  bit  of  hot  oill,  then  adding  this  to  the  cooked  dish  for  extra  flavor.