Fruit chaat

singlehanded-495-2

Knowing  my  love  for  food  and  stories  about  food,  I recently  received  ”  Climbimg  the  mango  trees  “,  by  Madhur  Jaffrey ,  from  my  children.  Going  through  the  pages  of  the  book   took  me  back  to  my  childhood  days.

Many  a  summer  afternoon  has  been  spent  sitting  on  the  branches  of  our  Guava  trees.  It  was  siesta  time  after  lunch.  With  the  elders  fast  asleep,  we  kids  sneaked  out  as  soon  as  we  felt  it  was  safe  to  do  so.  We   were  left  ‘  unsupervised’,  and  made  very  good  use  of  this  time  doing  things  that  would  otherwise  put  one  in  trouble.  A  little  packet  of  ‘Chaat  masala’  tucked  carefully  in  the  dress  pocket,  and  a  romantic  novel  would  be  our  companion.  The  property  had  four  Guava  trees.  To  tackle  our  constant  complaining  and  sibling      rivalry  , Ma  had  allocated  one  Guava  tree  to  each  of  us.  We  had  our  territories   charted.  The  forks  in  the  branches  were  now  occupied,  enough  fruits  for  each  one  of  us.

Last 12 Months - 0788-2DSC_0841

All  went  well,  until  we  had  company.  They  came  in  flocks.  about  fifteen  of  them  together.  The  timing  would  be  perfect,  just  when  the  Guavas  were  starting  to  mature.  Not  stone  hard,  neither  mushy  ripe. Very  loud  and  chirpy, they  spoke  “parrotese”.  One  foot  securing  the  branch ,  the  other  holding  the  guava.  The  very  sharp  red  beaks  digging  into  the  flesh,  the  round  eyes  moving  swiftly  from  side  to  side,  looking  out  for  predators.  Unless  shooed  away  they  would  finish  the  crop.

singlehanded-475

singlehanded-464

I  found  some  guavas  individually  wrapped  in  the  ‘Exotic’  fruit  section  of  my  local  grocery  store.  There  were  a  few  other  fruits  left  in  the  fruit  bowl  at  home,  that  demanded  immediate  attention.  I  assembled  a  fruit  chaat .

I  sat  in  the  patio  and  enjoyed  the  Chaat.  Finally  the  snow  is  all  gone. The  sight  of  the  crocuses  popping  up  from  ground,  the  sounds  of  the  birds  and  geese,  the  smell  of  the  first  rain  hitting  the  dry  earth  carries  a  magic  that  only  spring  brings.  The  long  days  with  blue  skies  have  made  us  forget  and  forgive  the  six  harsh  months  of  winter.

I’d  like  to  hear  from  you  friends.  Is  there any  particular  food  that  you  wait  for  in  spring?

 

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Apple                     Two,  cut  in  small  cubes.

Oranges                 Two,  skinned,  cut  in  bite  size  pieces.

Guavas                   Two,  deseeded  if  you  prefer,  cut  in  small  cubes.

Walnuts                   One tbsp

For  the  dressing,

Honey                              2 tsps.

Lemon  juice                   1 tsps

Cumin  seed  powder     1 tsps,  roasted  and  freshly  ground.

Chilli  powder                  1 tsps,  use  your  discretion.

Salt                                  To  taste

Cilantro                            1 tsps.  Finely  chopped.

Method;

Sprinkle  the  dressing  on  the  cut  fruits.  Add  the  walnut  pieces.  Adjust  to  your  taste.  Garnish  with  cilantro  leaves. Cover  the  bowl  and  refrigerate  for  a  couple  of  hours.  Serve  chilled.

singlehanded-497

Patali Gurer Payesh (Rice Pudding with Jaggery)

By  Ratna

Payesh

The  travel  itinerary  remained  the  same.  The  last  day  of  March.  Every  year,  without  fail.  The  Canada  geese  came  first.  The  Trumpeter  swans  and  the  Mallards  touched  down  a  couple  of  weeks  later.  All  are   busy  marking  their  territories,  house  hunting.  A  new  season,  a  new  chapter  in  their  lives.  The  buds  in  the  Willow  trees  are  growing  too.  It  feels  as  if  someone  has  waved  a  magic  wand.  There  will  be  flowers  and  fruits.  The  birds  will  start  their  families  soon.  Slowly,  imperceptibly,  nature  is  getting  ready  to  wake  up.  There  is  the  occasional  flurry,  a  little  tease  from  mother  nature.

spring-2

spring-4

spring

With  this  change  of  season  came  the  14th  of  April.  The  Bengali  new  year.  It  was  my  husband  N’s  birthday  too.  We  always  celebrate  it  with  Payesh,  not  cake.  Birthdays  and  Payesh  go  together  as  hands  and  gloves.  I  remember  Ma  ordering  extra  milk  from  the  milkman  the  day  before.  The  washed  rice  spread  out  on  the  old  newspaper  to  dry.  The  Patali  gur  was  available  only  during  winter,  so  she  would  lovingly  hoard  some  to  be  taken  out  on  special  occasions.  Once  the  Payesh  was  done  she  would  always  make  an  offering  to  God  first.  A  prayer  would  be  said  for  a  long  and  healthy  life   and  then  individual  bowls  would  be  served.

“Aajke  kar  jawnmodin  Boudi”?,  Whose  birthday  is  it  today  Boudi,   Aaroti  kakima  our  tenant  would  enquire  as  she  saw  Ma  patiently  stirring  the  milk  on  a  slow  fire.  It  didn’t  matter  that  we  had  moved  away  from  home,  Ma  would  not  forget  to  make  the  Payesh  offering  for  each  of  our  sibling’s  birthdays.

singlehanded-410-2

Unlike  in  the  Prairies,  April  in  India  would  be  warm.  The  Krishnochura  ( Delonix  regia )  and  Radhachura  ( Peltophorum  pterocarpum )  in  full  bloom.  The  mature  trees  on  either  side  of  the  road  with  their  red  and  yellow  flowers  would  almost  form  a  canopy.  The  Mango  trees  laden  heavy  with  fruits.  A  rainstorm  would  bring  down  a  few  of  these  small  green  tart  fruits,  much  to  the  delight  of  the  neighbourhood  kids  who  would  waste  no time  in  collecting  them  to  be  devoured  later  with  some  salt.

singlehanded-538

Different  times,  contrasting  climates.  The  caramel  like  taste  and   smell  of  ‘ Patali  gurer  Payesh’  evokes  the  same  sense  of  anticipation  as  it  did  many  many  summers  ago.   I  served  N  in  heart  shaped  ramekins.  As  for  everybody  else  they  got  theirs  in  tulip  glasses.

Shubho  Nawboborsho  (  happy  new  year  ),  friends.  The  greeting  is  late  but  the  wish  is  as  good  as  it  was  on  the  day.

Friends  how  do  you  prefer  your  rice  pudding?  Just  sugar,  cinnamon  or  any  special  flavours?  I’d  love  to  hear  from  you.

singlehanded-539

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Homo  milk                                             1  Litre

Basmati  rice                                           Half  cup

Sugar                                                      One  cup  (  or  to  taste  )

Ghee                                                       One  and  half  Tbsp

Patali  Gur  (  jaggery )                            Cut  in  small  pcs,  half  cup  or  to  taste

Bay  leaf                                                  Couple

Method;

Wash  the  rice  with  water.  Spread  it  out  on  kitchen  towel  to  dry.  Smear   the  dried  rice  with  ghee  and  set  aside.

Take  a  deep  bottomed  saucepan.  Rub  the  inside  with  a  layer  of  Ghee.  Pour  the  milk   and  heat  it  on  a  high  flame.  Throw  in  the  bay  leaves.   When  the  milk comes  to  a   boil,  lower  the  gas  to  medium.  Add  the  rice.  Keep  stirring  the  milk  continuously  so  that  it  doesn’t  stick  to  the  bottom  of  the  pan.  This  step  takes  around  half  hour  or  so.  The  milk  will  reduce  about  an  inch  from  the  side  of  the  saucepan.  The  rice  will  be  done  by  then.

Now  add  the  sugar.  Keep  stirring  until  the  Payesh  thickens.  Once  the  sugar  has  been  added  the  rice  won’t  cook  anymore.

Turn  off  the  gas.   Add  the  jaggery  and  mix  well.  Let  it  cool  down  before  you  serve.

Inside  scoop;

Add  the  sugar  only  when  the  rice  is  done.  Remember  once  the  sugar  is  added  it  would  stop  the  rice  from  cooking  any  further.

I  wouldn’t   slack  on  stirring,  if  the  milk  sticks  to  the  bottom,  it  will  add  the  burnt  milk  odour .  The  only  option  then  is  to  start  fresh  again.

Boudi            Term  used  to  address  elder  brother’s  wife.

Kakima          Aunty  in  Bengali.

Patali  Gur     Special  jaggery  extracted  from  the  sap  of  Date  Palm  trees.  Available  in   winter  in  West  Bengal,  India  or  in  Asian  stores  here  in  Canada.

 

Halwa and Fig Trifle

By  Ratna

Halwa  and  Fig  Trifle-2

“Michael  aajke  khoob  bhalo  rendheche”,   Michael  cooked  really  well  today,  is  the  first  thing  Ma  said  as  I  walked  in  through  the  door.  No,  this  is  not  any  Michael,  but  “The  Michael  Smith”.  Chef  Michael  Smith.  “Ghee  ke  boleche  Gee”,  she  would  brief  me  somedays.  Michael  said  Gee  for  Ghee,  totally  disregarding  the “h”.  My  close-to-eighty  mom  is  Michael’s  biggest  fan.

There  are  days  when  she  has  memory  lapses  and  calls  me  with  my  sister’s  name  or  the  other  way  round.  And  sometimes  recalls  in  great  detail  the  life   of  Henry  the  VIII,  recalling  high school  history  lectures.  “Awshtom  Henry”  as  she  refers  to  him  in  Bengali.  Osteoporosis  has  claimed  a  couple  inches  of  her  four  feet  ten  inches  height. “Aami  hole  eta  banatam”,  she  would’ve  cooked  these  ,  she  would  comment  after  watching  the  Iron  Chef  episodes.  Not  necessarily  agreeing  with  all  the  five  items  that  the  contestants  offered.  That  is  her  spirit.  We  sometimes  discuss  food  and  cooking  with  Ma,  to  take  her  mind  off  of  the  pain  from  arthritis.   Food  talk  always  lifts  Ma’s  mood.  She  is   our  little  Iron  Chef.

Halwa  and  fig  trifle-6

As  I  learnt  about  the  Lentils  Recipe  Revelation  Challenge,  I  mentioned  it  to  her  in  passing.  The  how  and  when  of  the  regulations.  We  need  only  to  send  the  picture  of  the  food  to  the  judges  not  the  bowl  of  food.  She  said  nothing.   The  picture  of  the  luscious  Trifle  on  the  front  cover  of  the  recent  “Canadian  Living ”  magazine  had  caught  my  eye  earlier  that  day.  I  was  toying  with  the  idea  of  incorporating  Mung  dal  Halwa ,  and  giving the  Trifle  an  Indian  twist.  Tucking  her  frail,  bent  body  into  the  Parka  before  her  doctor’s  visit,  I  cross  checked  a  few  details  of  the  Halwa  recipe. Eta  to  hawbe  na”,  but  that  won’t  do,   she  reminded  me,  I  had  to  come  up  with  an  innovative    way  of  using  lentil.  “Yes  mother”,  I  said,  “I  do  have  a  plan”.  She  listened  intently  while  I  explained  how  I  planned  to  paint  a  Halwa  colour  in  the  Trifle.  This  time  she  nodded  her  head  in  approval.

Halwa  and  fig  trifle-8

Mung  dal  Halwa  is  a popular  dessert  in  India,  particularly  during  the  winter  months.  It  helps  to  keep  the  body  warm. I  have  played  around  with  the  Trifle  recipe.  Used  Greek  yoghurt  and  honey  instead  of  the  custard. This  is  my  entry  for  “Best  in  dessert or  baked  good”,  in  the  Lentil  Recipe  Revelation  Challenge.

You  can  surprise  your  kin  with  this  new  dessert  for  this  year’s  family  Easter  dinner.  Let  me  know  how  it  turns  out.  If  you  like  this  recipe  please  do  not  forget  to  leave  a  comment.  I  do  need  your  help.  Please..

My   entry  for  the  “Best  in  the  appetizer”  category  here,  “Best  in  Main  dish”  here  and  “Best  in  salads”  here.

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Sufficient  for  six  tall  wine glass,

Pound  cake                           454  gms.  Store  bought.

Sun  dried  fig                          6  cut  in  thin  strips

Greek  yoghurt                         500  gms  tub.  Fat  free

Honey                                       Six  Tbsp

Pistachios                                  One  Tbsp

Orange  rind                              One  tsp

Pomegranate  seeds               One  Tbsp

Halwa;

Split  and  skinned  green  lentil                 One  cup

Ghee                                                           One  cup

Sugar                                                          One  cup

Method;

Halwa.

Soak  the  lentils  overnight.  Coarse  grind  it  with  very  little  water.  Strain  it  through  a  cheese  cloth  to  remove    the  excess  water.  Heat  ghee  in  a  pan  on  high  heat.  Add  the  lentil,  turn  the  gas  to  medium,  keep  stirring.  The  colour  will  slowly  change  to  a  light  brown  in about  twenty  five  minutes.  Add  two  cups  of  water  and  the  sugar.  Stir  carefully.  It  tends  to  splutter.  The  water  will  slowly  evaporate,  leaving  a  soft,  smooth,  delicious  Halwa.  Let  it  cool  to  room  temperature

To  assemble  the  Trifle,  slice and  pack  the  cake  in  the  bottom.  Next,  put  a  layer  of  Halwa . Spoon  the  Greek  yoghurt  on  the  Halwa  with  a  drizzle  of  honey.  Add  a  layer  of  thinly  sliced  figs.  Repeat  these  layers  to  fill  the  glass.  Top  it   up  with  a  few  pieces  of  pistachios,  orange  rind  and   pomegranate  seeds.

Grab  a  spoon,  put  your  feet  up  and  dig  in!

Inside  Scoop;

Stirring  the  Lentil  to  make  the  Halwa  takes  a  bit  a  time  .  The  result  is  totally  worth it.

You  can  read ,  how  to  make  Ghee  at  home  here.

Easy stuffed Dates

By  Ratna.

tutorial session-357

I  am  not  an  outdoor  person.  I  prefer  sitting  with  a  cup  of  hot  tea  and  gazing  out  through  the  window.  No  snowboarding  or  icehockey   here.

DSC_0354

DSC_0389

Bloghopping  is  my  favourite  past  time  these  days.  Who  would’nt  like  to  travel  from  Israel  to  India,  Texas  to  Turkey  with  a  click  of  your  mouse.  Visit  a  virtual  friend,  listen  to  their  stories,  take  a  peek  at  what’s  cooking  in  their  kitchen,  feast  with  your  eyes  at  the  beautiful  pictures.  Wouldn’t  you  agree  its  easier  than  losing  your  suitcase,  flights  not  taking  off, or  oh  don’t  forget,  the  slippery  road  conditions.  I  have  gone  a  step  further.  At  the  end  of  another  bloggers post,  it  asked  to  leave  a  comment  regarding  some  food,  which  I  did.  No  double  Jeopardy  questions  or  complex  mathematical  solutions.  Just  a  comment.  I  got  an  email  a  few  days  later  that  I  was  the  winner!  Note  to  self –  remember  to  buy  the  Lotto  max  tickets.

tutorial session-277

As  promised  in  the  post  I  received  a  set  of  cheese  boards  with  cutters  and  best  of  all  Brie  cheese  from  Castello.  Thank  you  “Keep  Calm  And  Eat  On”.  The  timing  couldn’t  have  been  better, as  I  recently  found  an  interesting  recipe  in  the  December  issue  of  Chatelaine  magazine.  Does  this  scenario  sound  familiar:  guests  are  arriving  soon,  still  not  sure  about  the  appetizers… or  a  last  minute  potluck  notice  at  work,  in  the  middle  of  the  week.  With  just  a  few  things  in  hand  you  can  change  a  disaster  to  a  winner.

tutorial session-293-2

tutorial session-352-2

Recipe:

Ingredient;

Mejdool  Dates                About 10

Brie  Cheese                  One  small packet  125  gms

Pistachio  nuts               Handful

Garlic                            One  Clove  coarsely  chopped

Rosemary  leaves         A  couple  shredded.  (Optional)

Honey                         One Tbsp

Method;

Preheat  the  oven  to  350  degrees  F.  Cut  the  dates  in  half  lengthwise  and  take  the  stone  out.  Keep  them  aside.  Unwrap  the  Brie.  Take  a  sharp  knife  and  make  a  cut  about  3 mm  from  the  periphery,  all  the  way  round.  Now  scoop  the  rind  off  from  the  top.  We  have  now  created  a  ‘moat’.  Seat  this  in  an  ovenproof  bowl.  Dump  the  honey,  nuts  and  garlic  in  it.  Sprinkle  with  a  few  cut  pieces  of  the  rosemary  leaf.  Cover  the bowl  with  aluminium  foil.  Bake  at  350  degrees  F  for  about  40-45  mts.  Scoop  up  this  mixture  of  melted  cheese  with  nuts  etc  and  fill  up  the  date  halves.  Arrange  them  on  a  tray  or  platter.  Welcome  your  guests  with  a  big  smile!

Inside  Scoop;

All  amounts  can  be  adjusted  as  per  taste. I  prefer  the  gooey  cheese  hence  I  melted  it  in  the  oven.  The  recipe  in  the  magazine  called  for  goat  cheese  and  pecan  nuts.  I  added  the  crushed  garlic,  which  I  thought  cut  the  sweetness  of  almost  everything  else.  It  took  very  little  time  from  start  to  finish.

Rusbhari Malai Handi (Gooseberry Cheesecake Pot)

Gooseberry   Cheesecake  pot

By  RatnaDSC_0867

It  did’nt  matter  whether  we  ordered  Filet  de  truite  fraiche  aux,  Bouillabaisse,       or  Tarte  Normande,  all  the  dishes  in  this  exquisite  French  restaurant   L’Heritage  came  with  a  final  touch,  a  crowning  glory  so  to  speak,  an  orange  berry  on  top. This  is  no  ordinary  berry  though.  Just  like  a  candy  in  its  wrap,  this  little  orange  berry  has  a  dainty  strawlike  calyx  .I  held  the  little  stem  with  my  finger  and  dug  my  teeth   in,   to  pluck  the  berry.  A  little  sweet  a  little  tart,  I  was  always  intrigued  by  this  fruit.  Such  was  my  attachment  with  this  berry , that  my  friends  and  family  have  more  than  once  given  up  their  share  to me.

On  a  recent  visit  to  my  SIL  in  India,  I  had  a  de  ja  vue.  Devi  my  SIL,  herself  an  award  winning  cook,  always   looks  for  ways  to  include  local  and  seasonal  veggies  and  fruits  in  her  cooking.  ‘Kisher  chutney  banali?’,  What  did  you  make  the  chutney  with,  I  ask  her,  after  giving  up  on  the  guessing  game.  Surely  the  sweet  and  tart  taste  with  the  familiar  chutney  spices,  were  all  pointing  towards  a  fruit.  But  which  one?  ‘Rusbhari’  she  said  matter-of-factly.  She  dose’nt  mean  Raspberry,  does  she?  The  colour  was  far  from ‘ Raspberry.’  Try  saying  Rusbhari  a  few  times,  dose’nt  it  sound  like  Raspberry?  In  as  much  as  I  was  itching  to  find  out  about  the  mystery  ingredient,  anymore  discussion  at  that  point  would  only  undermine  her  knowledge  about  Raspberry.

Gooseberries  and  Oranges

Gooseberries and Oranges
By Ratna

DSC_0744

After  a  brief  break,  I  see  my  brother -in-law  returning  with  a  small  packet  in  his  hand.  ‘There  you  go,  more  Rusbharis  for  you’  he  said.  As  he  put  the  shopping  on  the  table,  imagine  my  surprise  when  I  see  the  little  orange  berries  right  in  front  of  me.  A  few  of  them  were  tied  together  with  an  elastic  band.  The  calyxes  were  pulled  behind,  as  if  sporting  a  pony  tail !   I  was  like  a  kid  in  a  candy  store.  No,  I  didnt  gobble  them  down,  but  held  them  very  softly,  turned  them  over,  opened  the  elastic  bands,  tried  to  put  the  calyxes   back,  as  if  to  relieve  them  of  the  pain  from  a  tight  ponytail.  Then  came  the  camera,  I  tried  them  in  landscape  and   portrait  mode,  single  and  in  bunches,  flat  on  the  table and  in  glass  containers.  Not  sure  what  to  make  out  of  this    Rusbhari-love   of  mine,  my  brother-in-law,  pointed  his  finger  to  the  open  window,  as  if  even  uttering  a  word  would  dilute  the situation.  As  I  look  out  of  the  window,  I  see  a  man  with  a  wooden  cart  selling  something.  A  closer  look,  I  see  a  sea  of  Rusbharis   spread  out  on  the cart.  Here   was  the  berry  that  we  got  one  per  plate  in  the  restaurant.  It  is  being  sold  in  kilos!   I  can  surely  justify  Devi’s  decision  of   making  chutney  with  this  berry.

DSC_0849DSC_0738

‘Juicefilled ‘  would  be  the  literal  translation  in  English.  Cape  gooseberry  or  Physalis  peruviana    were  some  of  the  other  names.

DSC_0856

Very  recently,  I  saw  them  in  small  plastic  bushels  holding  about  ten  or  twelve  gooseberries  in  them,  in  my  local  grocery  store.  After  doing  the  happy  dance,  I  bought  a  couple  bushels.  I  knew  I  was  not  making  chutney,  I  wanted  to  relish  them  as  they  were with  minimum  cooking.  I  liked  this  idea  of  strawberry  cheesecake  pot  that  I  saw  in  Kirstie  Allsupp’s  video.   Why  dont  I  recreate  the  same  using  the  gooseberries?

DSC_0889

I  can  safely  say  you  won’t  be  disappointed. As  you  dig  the  spoon  in  the  cheesecake  pot,  to  include  a  bit  of  the  cut  berries,  the  layer  of cheese,  the  crunchy  biscuit  pieces  with  a  bite  or  two  of  the  almond  sliver,  there  is  a  medley  of  tastes.  The  sweet  and  soft  cheese  layer  melts  in  the  mouth,  giving  way  to  the  little  berry  pieces,  and  finally  the  chewy  bits  of  the  nuts ,  berry  seeds   and  biscuits.  .   I  must  admit  my  spoon  did  not  leave  any  evidence  of  the  cheesecake  being  in  the  pot.

DSC_0901-2Recipe:

Ingredients;

Light  Digestive  biscuits.  Peek  Freans            12

Low  fat  Greek  yoghurt.                                  150  gms

Extra  light  soft  cheese,                                   150  gms

Light  condensed  milk  .Carnation.                     Half tin.  200 gms

Lemon  juice                                                   From  one  lemon

Fresh  gooseberries                                        250  gms.

Almond  slivers                                              Handful

Method;

Crumble  the  biscuits  with  your  finger.  I  put  two  biscuits  in  each  tumbler.I  had  six  tumblers  in  all.

Place  the condensed  milk  into  a  bowl  and  add  lemon  juice. Stir  together  untill  the  mixture  has  thickened.  Whisk  the  cream  cheese  and  yoghurt  in  a  small  bowl  untill  smooth  then  fold  in  the  thickened  condensed  milk.  Spoon  the  creamy  mixture  over  the  biscuits.  Chill  for  atleast  30  minutes  to  an  hour.

Chop  the  berries. Add   about  two  tablespoon  of  the  cut  berries  to  the  cheesecake.  Throw  in  a  few  slivers  of  almonds  and  garnish  with  a  whole  berry  on  top  to  serve.

Inside  Scoop;

SIL            Sister-in-law

I  was  left  with  some  of  the  cheese  mixture,  You  can  be  generous  with  portioning  this.

 

Grape Galette (Last of the Summer Vine)

Grape  Galette

By  RatnaDSC_0640

I  used  my  blue  handle  secataurs  to  sever  the  fruit  from  the  stem, careful  not to cause   any  damage  to  the  leaves.  I  had  counted  them  before,  many  times,  there  were  sixteen  bunches  in  all. They  started  as  tiny  green  specks,  sometimes   hiding   under  cover  of  the  leaves.  With  time  they  became  plump  and   then  changed  color  to  purple. The  girls  in  my  office  got  daily  briefings,  from  conception  to  maturation,  with  pictures,  in  different  lightings.

DSC_0526DSC_0453I  held  the   basket  of  grapes  very  carefully,  brought  it  in  my  kitchen,  and  was  busy  giving  them  a  nice  wash,  just  like  a  new  mother  would , to  her  infant.   ‘Why  did  you  buy  such  tiny  little  grapes,  Mashi?”  exclaimed  Buri,  my  teenage  niece.  “They  are  organic  grapes  and  I  grew  them  in  my  garden”,  I defended.  Unaware  of  the  hurt  feeling  I  was  tending  to,  she  asked,  “Are  they  atleast  sweet?”  “There  are  different  varieties,”  I  cleared  my  throat,  ‘These  are  a  bit  tangy,”  I added.  At  this  time  she  tore  a  couple  of  them  from  one  bunch  and  vollyed  them  to  the  direction  of  her  mouth.  The  grapes  made  a  perfect  landing.  I  heard  a  crunch  first  followed  by  a  loud  “Ew,  it  has  seeds!”DSC_0586DSC_0573

My  grapes  are  small,  tangy  and  seeded,  I  said  to  myself.  They  have  grown  in  my  USDA  2a  garden  with  minimum  care.  They  are  not   “Concord’, “Cabernet  Sauvignon’  or  ‘Merlot’,  they  are  “Valiant’.  Staying  true  to  their  name,  they  come  back  year  after  year,  surviving  the  minus  thirtyfive  C  winter.  To  me  they  are  no  less than  Shiraz,  Pinot  Noir  or  Petit  Sirah.DSC_0664

What  do  I  cook  with  these  grapes,  I  pondered.  As  I  type  in  the  words  grape  recipes,  I  got  Gazpacho,  Gelato,  Salad,  Galette. My  eyes  were drawn  to  the  open  window,  where  I  saw  only  red  and  yellow  leaves.  The  combines  and  swathers  in  the  farmer’s  field  were  put  away  after  a  busy  last  few  days.  As  far  as  the  eyes  could  see,  the  hay  bales  were  neately  arranged.  ‘Your  days  are  gone  Gazpacho  and  Gelato,”  I  said  to  myself.  Grape  salad  sounded  too  plain  to  me.  Surely  these  grapes  deserve  much  more  than  being  added  in  a  salad.  Galette,  sounded  interesting . I  have  never  ‘Galetted”  anything  before.  Looked very  crispy  from  outside,  with  a  gooey  goodness  within. Galette  it  is, I’m  going  to  make  a  grape  galette.DSC_0672

I  followed  the  recipe  from  “Chatelaine”  magazine,  August    2013  with  some  changes.”  “The  autumn  leaves  ,flies  past  my  window”,  Diana  Krall’s  raspy  voice  was  playing  on  my  ipod.  I  started  measuring  the  flour..DSC_0693-3

Recipe

Ingredients;Pastry

 

All  purpose  flour  11/4  cup

Granulated  sugar  1Tbsp

Salt  1/4  Tsp

Unsalted  butter  1/2  cup  cold,  cubed

Ice  water  4  Tsp

Lemon  juice  1  Tbsp

Filling;

Packed  brown  sugar  1/2  cup

Cornstarch  3  Tbsp

Salt  1/8  Tsp

Grapes  seeded  4  cups

Almond  slivers  1/2  cup  Dry  roasted

Icing  sugar  1  Tbsp

Mint  leaves   2  or  3,  shredded  ( optional )  to  garnish.

Method

Take  the  flour,  sugar  and  salt  in  a  mixing  bowl.  Add  the  butter  and  mix  it  with  the  flour  till  crumbs  form.  Add  ice  water and  lemon  juice,  bring  the  dough  together.  It  should  not  be  sticky.

Position  the  rack  in  the  bottom  of  the  oven.  Preheat  it  to  375  degrees  F.  Lay  a  large  piece  of  parchment  paper  on  the  counter.  Sprinkle  lightly  with  flour.  Dust  the  rolling  pin  with  flour.  Roll  the  pastry  on  the  parchment  into  a  circle  about  12′  wide.  The  edges  can  be  uneven.  Transfer  the  parchment  and  pastry  to  baking  sheet.

Combine  brown  sugar,  cornstarch  and  the  salt  in  a  bowl.  Dry  roast  the  almond  slivers  and  add  them  in.  Tumble  fruit  mix  onto  centre  of  pastry  forming  a  10′  circle.  Fold  pastry  over,  just  to  cover  the  edge  of  the  fruit.  The  centre  of  the  pie  should  not  be  covered  with  pastry.  The  edge  will  be  uneven.  Lightly  brush  pastry  with  water  then  sprinkle  some  sugar.

Bake  till  pastry  is  golden  and  mixture  is  bubbly,  about  35 –  40  mts. I  garnished  with  slivers  of  mint  leaf.  Enjoy  either  with  icecream  or  with  a  drizzle  of  sugar.

Inside  Scoop;

1.  Deseeding  the  grapes  took  a  long  time.

2.I  had  to  take  help  from  black  seedless  grapes,  as  my  “Valiant”  grapes  did  not  yield  four  cups  as  the  recipe  asked  for  (  Shh….)

3.  Mum’s  sister  is  addressed  as  ‘Mashi’.

Munni’s Thekua (Indian Shortbread Cookies)

Indian shortbread cookie

Acchha  laga  Bhabiji ? ” Did   you  like  it  Bhabiji “?  Her  anxious  eyes  looking  at  me  for  approval.  “Munni”  is  the  household  help  at  my SIL”s  place.  She  spoils  us  everytime  I visit  my  SIL.

untitled

DSC_0342

As  I  took  a  bite  of  the  Thekua  I was  transported  to  my  University  days.  Staying  away  from  home  the  first  time,  Ma  always  worried about  food. Not  entirely  convinced  I  got  my favourite  snacks,  she  used  to  send  homemade  treats  for  me, treats  that  had  a  longer  shelf  life.  “Thekua”  made  frequent  visits  to  my  dormroom.  My  forever-hungry  roommates  cut  Thekua’s  life  short.DSC_0261

Tackling  the  rogue  aniseed  from  between  my  teeth,  I nod  my  head.  I  was  relishing  the  liquorice  taste  that  filled  my  mouth.  Satisfied  that  I  like  her  creation,  Munni  moves  on  to  her  next  chore,  washing  clothes,  tending  the  garden,  getting  groceries.  The  helping  hand  in  my  Prairie  kitchen  does  very  well  in  doing  dishes  and  clothes,  Miss  Whirlpool  hasn’t  tried  her  nuts-and-bolts  in  making  Thekua  though!

DSC_0355

DSC_0419

DSC_0374

..The  days  have  started  getting  shorter. There  is  a  chill  in  the  air.  The  blankets  are  left  out  on  the  sun,  so  they  are  more  comfortable  at  night. This  transition  of  seasons  reminds  me  of ‘Chhath’ – a  festival  celebrated  by  some  in  India, traditionally  in  November.  Our  neighbour  Renu,  would  always  bring  some  treats  for  us,  her  long  platts   neatly  tied  with  matching  ribbons.  We  were  half  expecting   her  to  do  the  same  this  year,  as  she   always  used  to.  Chhath  is   a  festival  where  the  devotees  worship  the  sun,  the  god  of  energy  and  of   life  force.  The  rituals  are  rigorous.  Devotees  abstain  from  drinking  water,  offer  prayers  to  the  rising  and  setting  sun,  standing   knee  deep  in  water. Thekua  is  a  revered  offering  during  this  festival.

Last 12 Months - 0541-2

 

DSC_0490DSC_0492.DSC_0301Recipe

Ingredients:

All  purpose  flour  (Maida)  2  Cups

Sugar  1  cup

Semolina  2  Tbsps

Baking  soda  a  small  pinch,

Aniseed  1  Tbsp,

Ghee  2  Tbsps

Method.

Mix   the   dry  ingredients  first  ,mix  in  the  ghee  next,   then   add  lukewarm  water  little  by  little,  to  make  a  dough. If  the dough  ends  up  being  a  bit  sticky,  sprinkle  a  bit  flour  to  make  it  right.    Divide  the  dough  into  16  pieces.  shape  them  in  any  way  you  like.  Traditionally  moulds  are  available,  like  the  one  I  used  here. I  sat  the  dough  ball  in  between  two  moulds  ,to  get  two  designs  on  either  sides.  Shallow fry  them  in  oil.

Let  it  cool  down  completely.  It  hardens  a  bit.  You  can  box  it  up  for  a  cookie exchange  or  surprise  your  family.

Inside  Scoop

1. For  a  healthier  version,  wholewheat  can  be  used. Grated  coconut,  raisins  can  be  added  in  the  mix.  Semolina  can  be  found  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

2. Bhabiji  is  how  an  elder  brother’s  wife  is  addressed  to.

3 .SIL:  Sister  in  law.

4.Ghee  is  clarified  butter,  available  in  the  world  food  section  in  most  grocery  stores.