Masala Chai: Spiced tea, for a fall day

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-11

‘Did  you  notice  the  leaves  turning  yellow?”  commented  J,  my  colleague  at  work.  That  was  middle  of  August.  “You  are  not  saying  what  you  are  saying,  are  you?’  I  retorted.  I  strengthened  my  argument  by  putting  forward  the  other  causes  of  leaves  turning  yellow,  for  example  drought.  Who  was  I  kidding  though.  I  knew  for  certain  that  it  was  the  beginning  of  fall.  It  didn’t  matter  that  people  were  still  on  summer  holidays,  that  the  snow  just  melted  not  that  long  ago  or  even  the  official  ‘fall’  was  still  more  than  a  month  away.  This  was  northern  Canada.  It  is  said  if  you  blink  long  enough  you  may  miss  the  summer!

untitled-4untitled-6

Come  September  there  was  no  denying  that  it  was  not  drought  that  caused  the  yellow  leaves,  the  summer  was  done  for  this  year.  There  was  a  chill  in  the  air.  Vegetable  gardens  were  harvested,  apple  pies  were  baked,  fleece  jackets  were  back  and  Costco  proudly  displayed  their  Halloween  supplies.

untitled-3untitled-5Now  Chai  ( Tea ),  doesn’t  need  a  season  to  be  enjoyed.  There  is  no  denying  the  magic  of  a  hot  cup  of  tea  on  a  cold  day  though.  N  and  I  packed  some  tea  and snacks  before  we  went  out  for  a  short  drive  to  take  in  the  colours  of  fall.  There was  yellow  and  red  and  everything  in  between.  It  was  as  if  the  nature’s  way  to  go  on  an  overdrive   with  colours,  for  the  next  six  months  will  be  only  white,  and  more  white.  The  calm  before  the  storm…

untitled-10

Tea  is  something  that  memory  is  made  out  of.  Who  can  forget  the  the  night  of  burning  midnight  oil  to  prepare  for  the  exam  next  morning,  when  the  cup  of  tea  is  your  loyal  friend.  Tea  is  needed  to  start  the  day,  at  the  end  of  a  hard  day’s  work.  What  about  that  boring  day  when  nothing  seems  to  be  in  your  favour?  Tea  is  what  we  break  a  bad  news  over  or  break  the  ice  with.  I  can’t  forget  how  as  teenagers  we  giggled  just  because  our  Uncle  R  slurped  his  tea  or  Aunty  P  blew  her  hot  tea  so  hard  that  we  all  avoided  sitting  next  to  her  to  save  our  dresses!

Here  it  is  friends.  This  is  how  we  enjoy  the  cuppa!

untitled-2

Recipe:

Serves  2.

Ingredients;

Tea  bags  ( Lipton’s  yellow  label )                                  Two

Cardamom  pods,  crushed                                              Two

Evaporated  milk                                                              Half  cup

Cinnamon  sticks                                                              Two

Granulated  Sugar                                                            Two  tsps

Water                                                                              One  and  half  cup

Method;

Bring  the  water  with  the  crushed  cardamom  to  boil,  about  4  minutes.  Throw  in  the  tea  bags,  continue  boiling  for  another  2   minutes..  Add  the  milk.  The  boiling  will  stop  temporarily.  Bring  it  to  boil  again,  about  a  minute,  taking  care  not  to  let  the  mixture  spill  over.  Turn  the  gas  to  medium  and  get  another  boil,  if  needed  turn  the  gas  lower  to  avoid  the  spill.

In  a  mug  take  a  teaspoon  of  sugar.  Pour  the  tea  into  the  mug  through  a  sieve.  Garnish  with  a  Cinnamon  stick  and  serve  piping  hot.

Take  away  the  cinnamon  stick  before  drinking.

Inside  Scoop;

White  sugar  can  be  substituted  with  Palm  sugar,  honey,  Splenda,  brown  sugar  or  any  other  sweetener  of  your  choice.

Grated  ginger  can  be  added  with  the  boiling  water  for  Adrak  ( Ginger  )  tea.

Every  family  has  their  favourite  blend  of  spice.  Apart  from  cardamom  and  cinnamon,  mace  or  even  a  combination  of  spices  are  sometimes  added.

Try  and  adjust  to  your  taste.

I  prefer  evaporated  milk  or  Homo  milk.  One  can  also  go  with  cream.

 

Chickoo ( Manilkara Zapota ) and almond shake. GF with DF option

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-5

What  shake?  I  know  your  thoughts,  exactly.  Chickoo,  Sapota.  Nope,  never  heard  that  before.  Well,  I  don’t  blame  you.  It  grows  only  in  tropical  climates  like  India,  Thailand,  Vietnam,  Southern  Mexico,  Central  America.  It  has  been  cultivated  in  Florida  in  the  US.

I  was  in  the  city  recently.  The  food  blogger  inside  me  always  likes  to  visit  ethnic  supermarkets.  I  like  trying  new  or  revisit  old  favourites.  This  was  my  find  this  time.untitled-3

This  brown  beauty  is  like  a  big  berry.  Inside  the  plain  skin  is  the  sweet,  meaty  and  a  bit  grainy  pulp.  Tease  the  few  long  black  seeds  out  and  you  are  ready  to  enjoy  the  fruit.

untitled-2

It  did  bring  back  memories  of  long  summers  years  back.  Not  only  was  the  market  flooded  with  Sapotas,  but   also  tribal  women  street  vendors  were  seen carrying  deep  wicker  baskets  filled  with  these  fruits  on  their  heads .  Defying  the  mid  day  heat  they  would  ferry  their  wares  calling  out  ”  Sapota  paka,  libi  go.”  Ripe  Sapotas,  anybody…

untitled-8

Next  time  you  see  these  unfamiliar  fruit,  do  not  shy  away.  Abundant  in  fructose  and  fibre  it  is  good  for  the  bowels.  It  contains  Tannins,  the  polyphenolic  antioxidant.  There  is  Vit  C,  minerals  like  Iron,  Calcium  and  Magnesium.  So  let  the  boring  exterior  not  fool  you.  As  is  said,  don’t  judge  the  book  by  its  cover.

Recipe:  Yielded  two  long  glasses

Ingredients;

Chickoo,  skinned,  pitted  and  cut  in  pieces                       2  cups

Homo  milk                                                                             2  cups

Honey                                                                                     1 Tbsp

Almond  pieces                                                                       2  Tbsps

Method;

Put  all  the  above  ingredients  in  a  blender  and  enjoy.  I  did  not  add  any  ice  cubes  here,  but  feel  free  to  add  it.  Garnish  with  almond  flakes.

Inside  Scoop;

Adjust  the  thickness of  the  smoothie  to  your  choice.  Some  like  it  runny,  I  like  it  thick,  you  may  even  need  a  spoon  to  enjoy.

Substitute  with  coconut  milk  for  DF  option.

Persimmon, Cherry and Pistachio Tart

Image

By  Ratna

persimmon, cherry and pistachio tart

I  am  a  sucker  when  it  comes  to  tag  lines  like  ‘Fresh,  Easy,  No-cook  meals’,  ‘No  bake  summer  fruit  tarts’  or,  ‘Machine  not  needed  ice cream’.  Baking  is  not  exactly  my  forte.

I  have  been  looking  for  a  tart  recipe  without  eggs,  fit  for  a  beginner  ‘tart  maker’  like  me.  The  August  cover  of  the  Chatelaine  caught  my  eye  with  one  such  recipe.

persimmon and cherry tart

The  weather  outside  has  been  nothing  but  gorgeous.  Clear  blue  skies,  warm  temperatures.  The  garden  is  in  full  bloom,  with  the  heady  perfume  of  roses  on  one  side  to  the  fruit  laden  cherry  tree  on  the  other.  The  smell  of  freshly  cut  grass  here  and  the  sound  of  the  Blackbirds  singing  there.  Oh,  how  I  love  this  time  of  the   year.

persimmon, cherry and pistachio tart fg-8

The  prairie  fields  are  yellow,  as  far  as  the  eyes  go.  Set  against  the  blue  sky  they  are  a  scene  to  behold.  The  blue  and  yellow,  the  yellow  and  blue.  A  gentle  breeze  sets  a  ripple  effect  swaying  the  heads  of  the  canola  flowers  from  one  side  of  the  field,  all  the  way  to  the  other.

persimmon, cherry and pistachio tart fg-2persimmon, cherry and pistachio tart fg-7

K  my  friend’s  daughter  graduated  from  high  school.  Standing  at  a  cross  road  of  her  life,  she  decided  to  move  to  the  city.  The  little  girl  with  braces  and  pigtails  is    a  lovely  young  lady  now,  ready  to  move  forward.  It  was  sad  to  see  her  leave.  What  else  but  sweet  could  drown  our  sorrows?

persimmon, cherry and pistachio tart-3

Lovely  outdoors,  great  event  and  an  excellent  recipe.  Each  complementing  the  other.  Just  like  the  blue  and  yellow  outside.

persimmon, cherry and pistachio tart fg-9

 

Recipe:  Adapted  from  Chatelaine  august  2015.

Ingredients;

Graham  cracker  crumbs                    4  cups

Unsalted  butter                                    1 1/2  cups  melted

Mascarpone  cheese                            1  cup

35% cream                                           1  cup

Honey,  divided                                    5  Tbsps

Vanilla                                                  1  tsp

Water                                                  1  Tbsp

Persimmon,  cherries                           2  cups

Finely  chopped  pistachios                 2  Tbsp

Lime  zest                                            1  tsp

Icing  sugar                                           1  tbsp

Method;

Skin  and  cut  the  persimmon  into  small  pieces.

Spray  a  8  inch  tart  pan  (  with  removable  bottom  )  with  oil.  Line  the  bottom  with  parchment.

Stir  cookie  crumbs  with  butter  in  a  medium  bowl  until  moist.  Scoop  this  mixture  into  the  pan.  Firmly  press  up  the  edges  until  crust  is  even  with  rim.  Press  down  to  cover  the  bottom  of  the  pan  with  this  mixture.  Freeze  until  very  firm,  at  least  1  hour.

Beat  the  mascarpone  with  cream,  4  tbsp  honey  and  vanilla  in  a  large  bowl  with  an  electric  mixer  on  medium-high  until  stiff  peaks  form,  2  to  3  min.

Stir  remaining  1  tbsp  honey  with  water  and  fruit  in  a  medium  bowl  until  glossy.

Carefully  remove  firm  tart  shells  from  pan  by  pressing  removable  bottom  up  and  out  from  ring.  Peel  off  parchment.  Set  shell  on  a  plate.  Spoon  mascarpone  mixture  into  the  shell.  Top  with  fruit.  Sprinkle  with  pistachios,  lime  zest  and  icing  sugar

Inside  scoop;

I  preferred  to  keep  the  cherries  intact,  mostly  for  the  visual  effect.

 

 

 

Strawberry in balsamic vinegar

Image

By  Ratna

strawberry in balsamic vinegar-16

A  short  drive  from  the  busy  city  of  Rome, felt  like  a  long  step  back  in  time.  The  beautiful  medieval  village  of  Mazzano  Romano  is  home  to  Chef  Fabio  Bongianni.  Halfway  in  Law  school,  he  realized  his  true  calling  in  life  was  food,  not  felons.  A  change  of  course  and  training  in  Paris  later,  he  opened  a  few  very  successful  restaurants  in  Rome.  That  was  not  all,  he  wanted  to  share  his  passion  with  others  with  similar  interest  and  opened  cooking  classes  both  in  Rome  as  well  as  in  Mazzano.

Roman holiday-59

Bonjourno,  greeted  Chef  Monica  to  our  small  group,  for  whom  just  marvelling  at  the  Fontanas  and  Basilicas  was  not  enough.  We  wanted  to  delve  further.  Eat  where  the  locals  do,  cook  like  the  locals.  We  had  joined  a  day  course  with  Chef  Fabio’s  team.  Bonjourno  we  returned  the  greeting.  Set  against  the  Treja  valley,  the  stone  houses  met  with  cobblestone  path  on  one  side  and  a  lush  green  vegetation on the  other.

The  first  stop  was  to  get  fresh  produce  from  the  local  grocer.  Zucchini,  tomatoes,  eggplants  whatever  was  in  season.  As  we  walked  back  to  the  apartment  a  group  of  elders  waved  us  with  a  gummy  smile.  Time  seemed  to  have  stopped  in  this  little  town,  or  maybe  it  was  the  attitude  of  the  locals  that  made ‘ time’  their  slaves,  not  the  other  way  around.  The  words  ‘Schedules’,  ‘Plans’  had  no  meaning.

Our  conversations  were  punctuated  only  by  the  rustle  of  the  leaves.  The  lazy  river  deep  in  the  valley  meandered   at  its  own  pace.  The  kitty  on  the  roof  top  kept  a  keen  eye  on  the  out  of  towners.

As  we  measured  flour  and  cut  strawberries,  tasted  the  ravioli  filling  and  rolled  out  the  pasta  dough  we  made  new  friends.  We  laughed  a  lot.

no yeast pizza-9

Mallo  what?  Malloreddu  explained  Chef  Monica  with  an  infectious  smile.  We  tried  to  say  the  word  without  much  success.  Our  new  friends  from  down  under  put  their  accent  on  the  word  sounding  it  funnier.  More  laughter  followed.

strawberry in balsamic vinegar-14

It  was  almost  lunch  time.  We  exchanged  email  addresses  and  made  foot  notes  while  cleaning  the  sauce  drip  from  my  recipe  book.

The  day  ended  establishing  deep  friendships.  We  left  richer  in  culinary  expertise  and  an  experience  that  will  forever  be  etched  in  our  hearts.

starwberry in balsamic vinegar fg-3strawberry in balsamic vinegar-17

strawberry in balsamic vinegar-15Strawberry  in  Balsamic  vinegar  is  a recipe  that  you  don’t  have  to  keep  the  fingers  crossed  for  or  hover  around  the  oven  worrying  about  the  outcome.  The  flavour  and  aroma  of  the  fresh  berries  are  accentuated  by  the  acidic  vinegar.  This  can  be  assembled  in  no  time,  leaving  you  with  plenty  of  time  to  catch  up  with  friends.

We  were  enlightened  that  this  recipe  has  been  served  since  Renaissance  times.

Recipe:

Adapted  from  the  book  “A  Fabiolous  Cooking  Day”.  Serves  six.

Ingredients;

Strawberries                       One  pound  two  ozs,  hulled  and  cut

Balsamic  vinegar              One  fourth  cup

Superfine  sugar                Two  Tbsps

Lemon  juice                      Two  tsps

Mint  leaves,  chopped      Three  Tbsps

Vanilla  ice  cream              As  needed

Greek  yoghurt                   If  using  in  place  of  ice  cream

Method:

Place  the  strawberries  in  a  glass  bowl.  Pour  the  balsamic  vinegar  and  lemon  juice  over  it.  Add  the  sugar,  mint  leaves  and  toss  together.  Cover  with  Saran  wrap  and  marinate  in  the  fridge  for  about  an  hour.  Serve  over  Vanilla  ice  cream.

I  have  used  Greek  yoghurt  instead.

Inside  Scoop;

I  preferred  using  the  mint  leaves  just  before  serving.

Check  out  their  website  here.

Aam Shawndesh : Mango and cheese fudge

Image

By  Ratna

mango cheese fudge-6

“Botsorer  Aaborjona,  dur  hoye  jak,  Esho  esho”.  Let  go  of  the  clutter  of  the  yester  year,  welcome  the  new  year.  Thus  sang  our  poet  Tagore,  the  Nobel  laureate.  Leave  behind  all  the  disappointments  and  negativity,  let  those  tears  dry  out,  let  us  welcome  the  first  month of  the  new  year  like  a  breath  of  fresh  air.  We  celebrated  the  Bengali  new  year  recently.

There  are  signs  of  new  life  in  my  garden  too.  From  between  the  dead  and  decayed  twigs,  I  see  new  green  shoots  poking  their  heads.  Crocuses  are  everywhere  now.  Their  mauve  petals  proudly  cupping  the  precious  ‘Saffron’  inside.  The  promise  of  the  new..

mango cheese fudge-10mango cheese fudge-9

A  special  occasion  calls  for  a  special  treat.  I  created  these  ‘Shawndeshs’  for  this  special  day.  ‘Sandesh’,  ‘Sondesh’  call  them whatever  you  may,  these  little  cheese  fudge  are  very  close  to  a  Bengali  heart.  Childbirth  or  birthday,  weddings  or  anniversary,  new  job  or  new  house,  Shawndesh  takes  the  centre  stage.

mango cheese fudge-8mango cheese fudge-7

Traditionally  cheese  is  collected  by  separating  the  milk  and  the  whey.  The  cheese  is  then  mixed  with  sugar  or  jaggery.  Additional  flavours  are  added  sometimes  using  fruits  or  even  chocolates.

mango cheese fudge

This  mixture  is  then  shaped  either  by  hand  or  with  the  help  of  fancy  molds.  The  formless  cheese  mixture  is  then  given  a new  identity,  a  new  look.  Local  flowers,  fruits,  leaves,  whatever  the  folk  artist  chose  as  his  design  for  the  molds.

mango cheese fudge-6

Decorate  with  saffron  or  raisin  or  enjoy  them  as  is..

mango cheese fudge-5

  Recipe: 

Makes  22-24  pieces.  I  have  consulted  the  recipe  from  this  beautiful  blog  ‘A  Homemaker’s  diary’.  A  few  modifications  later  here  we  are,  Aam  Shawndesh  my  way.

Ingredient;

Ricotta  cheese  (  Saputo  )                                     2  cups

Khoya  (  Milk  solids  )                                              1  cup,  crumbled

Mango  pulp                                                              1  cup

Sugar                                                                        3  tsps

Cardamom  powder                                                  1/4  th  tsp

Saffron  strands                                                         1/2  tsp

Ghee                                                                          1  Tbsp

Method:

Drain  the  Ricotta  cheese  of  the  water  through  a  cheese  cloth.  Add  the  mango  pulp  and  Khoya.  Put  this  mixture  in  a  deep  pan  on  low-medium  heat.  Keep  stirring  so  that  it  doesn’t  stick  to  the  bottom  of  the  pan.  Slowly  the  water  will  dry  out and  it  will  leave  the  sides  of  the  pan,  about  25  minutes.

Take  it  out  of  the  flame.  Add  the  sugar  and  cardamom  powder  and  mix  evenly.  Wait  till  it  comes  to  room  temperature.  Cover  it  with  Saran  wrap  and  place  it  in  the  fridge  for  about  an  hour.

Apply  some  Ghee  on  your  palm  and  gently  knead  the  dough  just  to  get  it  all  smooth.  You  can  divide  them  in  small  balls,  decorate  with  saffron  strands  and  enjoy  them.

If  you  have  molds,  grease  the  insides  and  keep  them  ready.  Pinch  a  tablespoon  of  dough,  knead  them  once  again  inside  your  fist  to  get  a  smooth  even  ball.  Press this  inside  the  mold,  even  out  the  sides.  Carefully  tease  it  out.  Decorate  with  saffron  strands  and  enjoy.

Inside  Scoop;

Khoya  or  milk  solids  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  store  or  the  World  food  section  in  Superstore.

Traditionally  Shawndesh  is  not  too  sweet.  Feel  free to  adjust  the  sweetness  to  your  liking.  Take  into  consideration  the  sweetness  of  the  mango  pulp.

Giving  them  shape  in  the  mold  could  need  a  bit  practise.  I  kept  Q  tip  handy  to  grease  the  inside  of  the  molds  and  to  clean  them  after  use.  If  the  imprint  did  not come  out  as desired,  do  not  despair.  Reshape  it  into  a  ball,  press    firmly  inside  your  palm  and  try  again.

.

 

 

 

Mawa Gujiya: Sweet Indian pastry for Holi

Image

By Ratna

untitled-9

I  once  read   somewhere  that  the  passenger  inside  the  plane  looking   out of  the window  as  it  is  taking off,  keeps  thinking  about  the  place  she/he  is  leaving,  while  the  child  playing  below  looks  at  the  plane  taking  off  and  dreams about  the  far  off  land.

blog1blog

As  I  look  out  at  the  snow,  from  inside  my  Prairie  home,  I  dream  of  the  distant  land  that  I  left  behind.  March  corresponds  to  the  beautiful   Indian  month  of   Phalgun.  The  warmer  temperatures  bring  out  the  mango  blossoms,  the  air  heavy  with  their  faint  fragrance.  The   Palash,  ( Butea monosperma ),  or  The  Flame  of  the  forest,  in  full  bloom.  The  coral  flowers  on  the  naked  branches  stand  proudly  against  the  deep  blue  sky.  Nature  is  painted  red,  and  so  are  the  people.  Colours  are  exchanged  between  friends  and  strangers.  On  this  day  everybody  is  same.  No  discrimination,  no  refusal  either.   Holi  Hai,   It  is  Holi,  can  be  heard   on  the streets.

untitled-5untitled-2untitled-6

Just  as  cranberry  sauce  reminds  us  of  Thanksgiving,  Mawa  Gujiya  is  the  sweet  one  can’t  do  without  during  Holi.  Mawa  is  the  word  for  milk  solids.  Gujiya  is  a  pastry.  The  Mawa  filled  pastry  can  be  had  as  is  or  it  can  be  taken  a  step  further.  Dunked  in  sugar  syrup  with  a  final  sprinkle  of  Pistachio  nuts,  the  Gujiyas  are  now  ready.

 

The  deeper  significance  of  Holi  is  as  follows.  Devout  Prahlad  survived  every  time  his  atheist  father  tried  to  kill  him.  A  true  devotee’s  prayer  always  get  answered.

Recipe:  Makes  about  20-25.

Ingredients;

For  the  Pastry,

All  purpose  flour  or  Maida                                          2  cups

Ghee                                                                              1/4  th  cup

Cold  water                                                                     As  needed

For  the  filling,

Mawa                                                                               100  gms

Sugar                                                                                Half  cup

Unsweetened  grated  coconut                                         Two  Tbsps

Coarsely  broken  almonds                                                Two  Tbsps

Raisins                                                                                One  Tbsps

Cardamom  powder                                                         Half tsp

Nutmeg  powder                                                             One  fourth  tsp

For  the  syrup,

Sugar                                                                                   One  cup

Water                                                                                    Half  cup

For  the  garnish,

Finely  chopped  Pistachios                                                   Two  Tbsps

Method,

Take  the  flour  and  ghee  in  a  bowl.  Take  a  bit  in  between  the  palms  of  your  hand  and  rub,  such  that  the  flour  is  coated  evenly  with  ghee.  Now  add  cold  water  a  bit  at  a  time,  and  make  a  tight  dough.  Cover  and  let  sit  for  half  hour.

Place  the  Mawa  slab in  a  pan  on  medium  heat.  Crumble  into  small  pieces  and    stir untill  it turns  a  light  brown  colour.  Switch  off  the  gas.  When  this  has  cooled  a  little,  add  the  other  ingredients  listed  under ”  fillings  “.  I  used  my  hand  to  bring  everything  together.

Uncover  the  dough  and  make  about  20-25  balls.  Roll  out  each  to  about  3  inches  diameter.  Place  about  one  to  one  and  half  tsp  filling  on  it  and  fold  in  half.  Use  a  bit  of  water  and  seal  the  margins.  Pinch  it  hard  for  an  excellent  seal.  So  now  it  is  a  semicircle.  You  can  leave  the  edges  as  they  are  or  flute  them  with  the  end  of  the  fork.  If  you  want  to  be  fancy,  twist  the  ends  to  make  it  look  as  I  have  done  here.

Take  oil  in  a  frying  pan  such  that  the  gujiyas  are  completely  immersed.  Keep  the gas  in  medium.  Pinch  a  tiny  piece  of  dough  and  release  it  in  the  pan.  The  oil  is  ready  if  the  tiny  piece  floats  up.  Carefully  fry  the  gujiyas  until  light  brown  in  colour.  Place  them  on  absorbent  paper  napkins.

Combine  the  sugar  and  water  to  make  the  syrup.  Let  it  come  to   boil  then  crank  the  heat  down  a  bit.  Take  a  drop  of  this  syrup  in  a  bowl.  When  slightly  cooled  dip  the  index  finger  in  it.  Touch  the  thumb  to  the   index  finger  and  separate  slowly.  The  syrup  is  of  the  right  consistency  if  a  thin  string  of  congealed  syrup  is  formed..  This  is  called  ‘one  string’  syrup.  If  you  are  using  a  candy  thermometer,  the  syrup  is  done  at  about  110  degrees  Celsius .   Dip  the  gujiyas  in  the  syrup  and  take  them  out  right away.  Let  them  sit  on  a  wire  rack  to  catch  the  drip.

When  they  are  still  moist  dust  them  with  the  ground  pistachios.  Gujiyas  are  now  ready  to  enjoy.

Inside  Scoop;

Recipe  was  adapted  from  Nishamadhulika.com  with  a  few  changes.

Do not  overfill  the  Gujiyas.

The  fancy  folding  of  the  sides  need  a  bit  of  practise.

Here  is  a  video  that  can  be  helpful.

Mawa  can  be  bought  from  Indian  grocery  store.

Persimmon Burfi for ‘Makar Sankranti’

Image

By  Ratna

persimmon burfi-3

Where  would  we  be  without  the  Sun?  Take  a  moment  and  think  about  it.  Wouldn’t  it  be  safe  to  say  that  our  whole  existence  would  be  at  stake?  Our  ancestors  realized  pretty  early  on  that  Sun  is  the  most  important  of  all  the  cosmic  bodies.  Hence  every  Sun  centric  event  became  important  spiritual  and  cultural  events  in  our  lives.

persimmon burfi

There  are  twelve  zodiac  signs.  The  Sun  is  the  centre,  motionless  and  constant.  The  earth  by  moving  around  the  sun  is  passing  from  one   zodiac  sign  to  the  next,  every  month.  This  transition  is  known  as  Sankranti.  There  are  twleve  Sankrantis.  Although  each  Sankranti  has  its  own  relative  importance,  the  Makar  Sankranti  is  special.  This  transitiion  is  from  Sagittarius  to  Capricorn.  It  is  celebrated  on  the  14th  of  January.

Transition  or  movement  can  only  be  appreciated  when  we  have  experienced  stillness.  Movement  and  stillness.  Stillness  and  movement.  We  need  one,  to  experience  the  other.   Two  diametrical  opposites, one  has  no  existence  without  the  other.  Just  like  night  and  day.  On  this  auspicious  day,  let  us  cultivate  the  stillness  within  ourselves  to  enjoy  the  movements  outside.  Birth,  childhood,  adulthood,  old  age.

Families  get  together  and  celebrate  with  food,  flying  kites,  bon  fire,  rangoli  (  drawing  design  in  front  of  the  house  ).  The  most  important  being  forgetting  all  differences  and  making  a  fresh  start.

persimmon burfi-6

persimmon burfi-7

Rice  pudding  with   jaggery,  sesame  seed  balls,  peanut  brittle  are  very  popular.  I  had  these  Persimmons  at  home.  Sticking  with  the  dessert  theme,  I  made  Burfis  with  them.

Happy  Makar  Sankranti  to  all  of  you.

persimmon burfi-5

Recipe:  Made  16  pieces

Ingredient;

Persimmon                                               Six,  cut  in  small  pieces.

Sugar                                                        Half  cup  or  to  taste.

Whole  milk                                               Two  cups

Milk  powder                                             Half  cup

Saffron                                                      A  large  pinch

Almonds                                                   !2-15,  thinly  sliced

Pistachios                                                 12-15 ,  thinly  cut

Coconut  powder                                      Half  cup

Cardamom  powder                                  Half  tsp

Method;

Soak  the  saffron  in  a  Tbsp  of  warm  milk  and  keep  aside.

Make  a  puree  from  the  cut  pieces  of  Persimmon.

In  a  saucepan  on  medium  heat,  mix  the  persimmon  puree  and  sugar.  Wait  till  all  the  sugar  melts,  and  you  have  a  sauce.

In  another  saucepan  add  the  milk,  milk  powder,  coconut  powder  on  medium  heat.  Add  the  persimmon  sauce.  Keep  stirring  so  that  it  doesn’t  stick  to  the  bottom of  the  pan.  You  may  even  want  to  crank  down  the  heat  to  low.  The  whole  mixture  will  start  to  thicken  slowly  and  tend  to  leave  the  side  of  the  pan.  It  took  me  about  45  minutes  to  get  a  soft  dough.  Add  cardamom  powder  and  soaked  saffron.  Put  the  gas  off.

Line  a  cookie  sheet  with  wax  paper.  Transfer  the  above  to  the  cookie  sheet.  Spread  evenly,  such  that  it  is  about  half  inch  thick.  Cut  into  squares.  Let it  sit  on  the  counter  until  it  cools  down  to  room  temperature,  then  throw  it  in  the  refrigerator.  I  left  it  overnight.

Garnish  with  almond  and  pistachio  slices  and  sprinkle  a  few  more  saffron  strands.

Enjoy  with  your  family.

Inside  Scoop;

Milk  mixture  sticking  to  the  bottom  of  the  pan  is  common,  do  not  stop stirring.

Some  of  the  text  regarding  the  meaning  of  Makar  Sankranti  was  from  Isha foundation.org