Bhejitabil Chawp : Spicy Vegetable Croquet.

By  Ratna

bhejitabil chop blog-4

The  train  came  to  a  sudden  halt,  waking  me  up. Rubbing  my  eyes  I  look  out  of  the  window  to  figure  out  where  we  were.  A  smallish  station  with  busy  vendors. Steaming  cups  of  tea,  pre packed  snacks  exchanging  hands.  A  fruit  seller  with  bananas  and  oranges  at  a  distance,  a  thick  scarf  covering  his  ears  and  head.

.bhejitabil chop blog-2

We  were  making  the  four  hour  train  journey  from  Howrah  to  Tatanagar  in  India. With  the  schools  closed  for  December  holidays  there  were  lots  of  families  with  young  children  travelling.  The  fleeting  landscape  outside  was  different  shades  of  green.  Green  grass,  green  trees  with  climbers  wrapped  around,  green  fields,  even  the  lakes  and  ponds  which  were  so  abundant  had  green  plants  covering  the  surface.

beetrootblog

A  steady  stream  of  hawkers  made  their  rounds.  Newspapers,  magazines  with  special  deals,  incense  sticks  with  promises  of  one  of  a  kind  fragrance.  Mobile  shoe  shine,  a  blind  man  with  outstretched  arm  seeking  pennies,  his  melodious  voice  reminding  us  how  good  deeds  in  life  are  always  paid  back  tenfold  by  the  almighty.  His  other  arm  resting  on  the  shoulder  of  a  barefooted  little  girl .The  song  definitely  had  an  impact  for  I  heard  the  clinking  of  the  coins  against  his  tin  can.

The  train  had  left  the  station  and  was  slowly  moving out.  A  spicy  aroma  was  followed  by  a  skinny  man  with  a  big  wicker  basket  hanging  around  his  neck.  A  red  cloth  covered  the  snacks,  with  an  assortment  of  small  tin  containers  neatly  arranged  around  the  periphery  of  the  basket.  It  was  hard  not  to  give  in. The  family  sitting  right  across,  enquired  the  price.  There  was  a  brief  conversation  accusing  the  vendor  of  his  cut  throat  prices .  The  vegetable  prices  had  skyrocketed  he  mumbled  in  his  defence.  The  deal  did  go  through  with   my  fellow  passengers  carefully  balancing  the  ‘Chawps’  on  a  bowl  made  from  dried  leaves.

bhejitabil chop blog-6

We  were  not  allowed  food  from  these  vendors  with  questionable  hygiene.   Looking  away  was  not  helping  as  the  overwhelming  aroma  and  the  sound  of  crunchy  onions  or  peanuts  was  causing  my  mouth  to  water. I  still  made  a  feeble  attempt  and  looked at  Baba.  He  nodded  his  head  to  reinforce  what  I  already  knew.  Ma however  promised  that  she  would  make  it  for  us  when  we  reached  home.  And  she  did !  With  a  hot  cup  of  tea  these ‘ vegetable  chawps’,  are  to  die  for.  With  the  abundance  of  root  vegetables  during  the  winter  months  this  snack  was  a  regular  in  our  house.

It  is  not  winter  here  in  the  Prairies  yet.  September  brought  some  snow  though,  would  you  believe?  It  didn’t last,  but  prompted  me  to  get  my  hand  shaping  these  ‘Chawps’

bhejitabil chop blogbhejitabil chop blog-7

What  are  your  favourite  snacks  while  travelling.  I’d  love  to  hear  from you.  Do  drop me  a  line.

Recipe;

Ingredients;

Beetroots                                                Two  large.

Carrots                                                    Two

Potatoes                                                  Two

Peanuts                                                   One  Tbsp

Raisins                                                     One  Tbsp

Ginger                                                      One  inch  grated.

All  purpose  flour                                    Two  Tbsp

Breadcrumbs                                           One  packet.  I  used  Panko.

Canola  oil                                               Two  cups  for  frying.

Onion                                                      One  cut  in  thin  julienne.

Salt                                                         To  taste

Spices,

Cumin  seeds                                   One  and  half  tsp

Fennel  seeds                                   One  and  half  tsp

Red  chilli  powder                            One  tsp

 

Method;

Put  the  potatoes  and  beetroots  in  a  pressure  cooker  skin  on,  wait  for  two  whistles,  turn  the  gas  off.  Let  it  cool  down.  Skin  the  vegetables.  Mash  the  potatoes, grate  the  beetroots.  Skin  the  raw  carrots  and  grate  them.  Keep  them  aside.

Dry  roast  the ones  listed  under  Spices,  grind  and  set  aside.

Take  a  pan  with  one  Tbsp  of  canola  oil  on  high  heat  and  throw  the  peanuts  in.  Fry  for  a  few  minutes  till  they  get  some  colour  then  add  the  raisins.  Add  the  vegetables  soon  after.  Bring  the  heat  to medium  now.  Saute  for  a  few  minutes,  add  the  ground  spices  and  salt.  It  is  done  when  the  mixture  is  all  dry  or  all  the  moisture  is  gone.  Put  the  gas  off  and  let  it  cool  down.

Make  a  slurry  with  the  flour  and  water.  Spread  the  breadcrumbs  on  a  newspaper  sheet. Take  a  handful  of  the  above  mixture  and  form  an  inch  and  half   cylinder  with  your  hand.  Dip  these  first  in  the  flour  slurry  then  in  the  breadcrumbs  so  they  are  coated  evenly.  Dip  in  the  slurry  and  breadcrumbs   a  second  time.

Take  a  frying  pan  with  one  inch  deep  oil  in  it  on  high  heat.  Gently  lower  the  croquets  and  lower  the  gas  to medium.  Fry  to  a  nice  brown  colour  turning  them  carefully  so  that  it  is  done  from  all  sides.  Collect  them  on  a  tissue  paper.

To  serve  sprinkle  some  “Chat  masala’  on  the  ‘Chawps’.  A  few  slices  of  onions  on  the  side  and  Tomato  ketchup to  dip  in.

Inside  Scoop;

When  frying  the  veggies  and  spice  mixture,  taste  to  make  changes.  We  like  it  spicy. You  can  titrate  it  to  your  taste.

Chaat  Masala  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

Makes  about  12-15  depending  on  the  size.

Baba  is  the  Bengali  word  for  Dad.

Roasted Phool Makhana

singlehanded-555

Growing  up,  we  have  heard the  expression  “Dev  Anand  Jewel  thief  hai”  many  times.  What  could  be  the  big  deal,  I  often  wondered.  Dev  Anand  (  60s  Bollywood  star )  is  the  Jewel  thief,  goes  the  simple  translation.  It  was only  in  my  teenage  years,  that  my  Mejo  Kakima  trusted  me  with  the  family  secret.

Almost  every  summer  my  Jethamoshai  paid  us  a  visit.  Always  in  a  spotless white  shirt  and  Dhoti, he  frequently  used  his  very  stained  handkerchief  to  wipe  his  nose.  Inspite  of  cleaning  the  nose,  there  always  used  to  be  some  snuff  that  lingered  on  top  of  his  upper  lip,  giving  the  impression  that  he  sported  a  funny  moustache.  I  clearly  remember  the  summer, when  I  was  included  in  the  “elite”  group  in  the  family.  Mejo  Kakima  caught  my  attention,  then  moved  her  eyes  towards  Jethamoshai.  Without  saying  a  word  the  message  was  sent  out  ,  that  the  above  story  was  about  this  man.  I  was  so  proud  of  myself  then,  that  I  was  able  to  interpret  this .

  That   Jethamoshai  was  thrifty  was  common  knowledge.   Popcorn  was  unheard  of   in  movie  theatres  then.  Peanuts  roasted  and  dressed  with  lipsmacking  spices  used  to  be  sold  in  paper  cones.  Costing  not  more  than  a  few  cents,  people  didn’t  think  twice  about  treating  themselves  with  these  snacks.    Moong  Phali,  Moong  Phali   is  all  you  heard  during  intermission. The  story  goes  that  Jethamosai  went  to  theatres  to  watch  the  movie  “Jewel  Thief”  once. The  hawker  tried  his  best  to  persuade  my  Jethamoshai  to  buy  some  peanut  snacks..  It  didn’t  work.  Jethamoshai  did  not  budge.  The  hawker  then  decided  to  punish  him.  It  was  a  thriller  movie,  the  story  had  just  climaxed, everybody  was  eager  to  know  the  end  of  the  story. After  all  who  could  the  Jewel  thief  be  ?  Just  when   you  couldn’t  leave  your  seat,  and  wished  they  wouldn’t  even  stop  for  intermission.     Then,  at  that  moment  the  hawker  in  a  hushed  voice  spitted  those  few  words  “Dev  Anand  Jewel  thief  hai”,  in  my  Jethamoshai’s  ears  and  walked  off.  The  smooth  talking,  lead  actor  with  a  boyish  face,  was  in  fact  the  thief.  There….

singlehanded-549

Phool  Makhana  is  not  popcorn,  neither  is  it  sold  in  cinemas.  It  is in  fact  Lotus  seed  that  when  roasted,  puffs  up  just  like  the  popcorns  do.  It  is  also  known  as  Foxnut  or  Euryale  Ferox.   With  a  few  sprinkle  of  your  favourite  spices,  you  can  have  the  same  crunch  with  quite  a  few  health  benefits .  An  excellent  source  of  protein  and  calcium,  it  is  also  known  to  restore  the  body’s  vigour  and  delays  aging.

If  you  are  watching  the  Dufour-Lapointe   sisters  in  the  women’s  Moguls  skiing  event  in  Sochi  Olympics, or  Deepika  Padukone  in  the  Filmfare  awards,   keep  a  few  papercones  filled  with  Phool  makhana,  within  arm’s  reach.  You  might  even  be  looking  for  more.

Extra  butter  anybody?

singlehanded-565-3

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Phool  makana               One  packet  50  gms

Sea  salt                        To  taste

Turmeric  powder          One  fourth  tsp

Chilli  powder               One  fourth  tsp  (  Use  your  discretion  )

Cilantro                        One  tsp  finely  chopped.

Ghee                           One  tbsp

Chaat  masala             One  fourth  tsp

Lemon  juice                Half  tsp  (  optional  )

Method;

Take  ghee  on  a  frying  pan,  on  medium  heat.  When  the  ghee  melts  add  the  Phool  makhana,  saute  on  low  to  medium  heat  for  about  eight  to  ten  minutes. Throw  in  the  turmeric  and  chilli  powder,  sea  salt.  Put  the  gas  off.  Try  a  couple  when  its  not  too  hot.  It  should  be  crunchy  all  through  and  not  hard  inside. If  it  still  feels  hard  inside  saute  for  a  couple  minutes  more.  Add  the  cilantro,  chaat  masala   and  a  squeeze  of  lemon  juice,  if  you  prefer.

Make  papercones  and  stuff  these  inside.

Inside  Scoop:

Jethamoshai          Dad’s  elder  brother.

Mejo  Kakima         Dad’s  second  brother’s  wife.

Phool  makhana  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

Matarshutir kochuri

Fried bread with pea filling

By Ratna

tutorial session-084-2

There  is  the  black  dress  and  there  is  the  PJ.   It  is  customary  to  have  two  names  in  India.  The  one   from  the  birth  certificate,   is  the  official  name.  There  is  one  more  name,  which  is  used  only  at  home,  by  close  friends  and  family,  kind  of  the  “PJ”  of  names,  if  you  will.    One  cannot  address  elders  by  either  of  the  two  names  though!   A  generic  uncle  leaves  so  many  questions  unanswered.  So  kaku  is  dad’s  brother,  mamu  is  mum’s  brother.  Bawro,  Mejo,  Shejo   if  it  is  eldest,  second  or  third.  If  that  option  runs  out,  we  can  use  some  special  attribute  of  the  person,  Bhalo  mamu;  good  uncle.  It  can  be  his  work  like,  Daktar  kaku;  physician  uncle.  It  can  even  be  the  place  where  he  or  she  lives.  Londoner  Pishi,  Kolkatar  Dida.  Dad’s  sister  who  is  from  London  or  granma  who  lives  in  Kolkata.

tutorial session-052-3

I  had  a  Kolkatar  Dida.  My  Kolkatar  Dida.  She  was  my  Dida  and  not.  She  wasn’t  my  mum’s  mother.  She  was  her  Mamima,  her  mum’s  brother’s  wife  to  be  exact. ‘ Dekho,  bhitore   jeno   hawa   na  thake’,  make  sure  there  is  no  air  left  inside.  She  used  to  remind  me,  while  stuffing  the  Kochuri.  Her  deft  fingers  moving  swiftly,  measuring  the  exact  amount  of  filling   everytime   and  stuffing  them,  all  the  while,  her  gaze  fixed  on  my  novice  hand. The  winter  in  Kolkata  would  see  fresh  peas  in  the  grocery  stores.  There  were  many  fond  memories  made,  helping  Dida  make  Kochuris.

tutorial session-087-2

Proud  to  be  the  first  Bengali  women  trained  Librarian,  she  treated  the  spice  cabinet  of  her  kitchen  or  the  credenza  in  the  dining  room  the  same  as  the  books  in  her  library  at  work.  The  turmeric  jar  could  always  be  found  on  the  third  rack,  second  place  from  left.  You  could  pick  the  tea  cozy  from  the  top  right  drawer  of  the  credenza  blindfolded.

She  seemed  to  have  solutions  to  everything.  Moving  to  the  big  Metropolis  of  Kolkata  from  a  little  town  with  only  a  single  traffic  light,  I  was  always  scared  that  I  couldn’t  find  my  way  around.  “Keep  your  eyes  on  the  store  signboards  along  the  way,  they  have  the  adresses  clearly  written”,  she  said. Trivial  as  it  may  sound  today,  it  used  to  be  a  challenge  back  then.   The  daily  commute  to  University  from  Dida’s  house  used  to  take  a  good  three  quarters  of  an  hour  by  the  city  bus,  in  rush  hour.  “Office  time”  as  they  called  it.  I  learnt  that  Gariahat  road  turned  into  Rashbihari  Avenue,  Southern  Avenue  joined  the  Aushutosh  Mukherjee road.

Weekends  would  be  spent  enjoying  good  food  or  movie.  If  that  meant  we  had  to  travel  all  the  way  to  the  north  side  of  the  city  to  ‘Putiram’s’,  to  enjoy  their  famous  sweets,  so  be  it.  An  Uttam-Suchitra  movie,  ( romantic  Bengali  star  duo  ),  had  to  be  seen.  A  Bengali  woman  should  be  perfectly  adept  to  discuss  the   the  latest  live  theatre  production  of  Tripti  Mitra,  to  learning  the  subtleties  of  a  Bengali  kitchen.  It  didn’t  matter  if  your  course  work  was  due  the  next  week.  Being  a  well  rounded  person  was  far  more  important  to  her  than  a  geek.

tutorial session-085-2

I  was  in  Kolkata  last  year  about  this  time,  after  a  few  years.  It  was  the  same  familiar  place.

DSC_0491

DSC_0559

The  boxy  yellow  cabs,  the  new  bridge  over  the  river  ‘Ganga’,  the  neon  pink  Bougainvellias  draping  the  whitewashed  walls  of  my  Dida’s  house,  the  canopy  of  green  leaves  every  which  way  your  eyes  could  see.

DSC_0582DSC_0504

The  unfamiliarity  inside  the  house   was  striking.  While  I  sat  in the  drawing  room , it  felt  like  Dida  was  busy  in  the  kitchen,  when  I  walked   in  the  bedroom ,  it  felt  Dida  would  emerge  from  the  bathroom  with  a  towel  wrapped  around  her  long  hair.  She  didn’t.  My  Kolkatar  Dida  is  no  more.

Recipe:  Makes ten kochuris

Ingredients;

For  the  filling,

Frozen  peas               One  cup  measure.  Thawed.

Ginger                         Three  quarter  inch.

Green  chillies               Two,  use  your  discretion

Asafoetida                    One  quarter  of  a  tsp

Salt  to  taste

For  the  bread  (  dough  or shell  ):

All  purpose  flour  or  Maida    One  and half cup

Canola  oil                              One  Tbsp  for  the  dough.   More  for  frying.

Salt                                        One  quarter  tsp.

Method;

Filling,

Grind  the  peas , ginger  and  chillies  together  using  very  little  water.  Put  a  nonstick  pan  on  medium  high  heat.  Add  two  tsps  canola  oil.  When  hot,  throw  in  the  Asafoetida.  Stir  for  half  a  minute,  there’ll  be  a  nutty  aroma.    Add  the  ground  filling  mixture . Saute  till  there  is  no  water  left  behind  and  the  colour  has  changed  to  a  hint  of  brown.  Put  the  gas  off,  and  keep  it  aside  to  cool.  Make   small  balls  when  you  can  handle  them.

For  the  shell,

Combine  the  flour,  salt  and  oil  in  a  bowl  and  mix  with  fingers  untill  it  feels  crumbly,  like  making  a  pastry  dough.  Mix  water  a  bit  at  a  time  to  make  a  firm  dough.  Divide  into  small  balls.  Cover  with  a  wet  towel,  let  it  rest  for  half  hour.

To  assemble,  take  a  dough  flatten  it  between  the  palm  of  your  hands  to  about  an  inch  and  a  half  in  diameter.  With  the  first  finger  and  thumb  of  your  right  hand,  pinch  the  edge  all  the  way,  to  make  it  thinner.  Cup  the  left  hand  with  the  flattened  dough  in  it  and  seat  the  filller  in.  Seal  the  edges  of  the   pastry, start  with  right  hand  side  using  the  first  finger  and  thumb  again  slowly  moving  to  the  left,  making  sure  there  is  no  air  trapped  in.  Give  a  good  round  shape  and  let  it  rest  for  a  few  minutes.  Sprinkle  a  few  drops  of  oil  on  the  countertop, to  prevent  the  dough  from  sticking to  the  rolling  pin.  Flatten  the  filled  dough  using  both  hands  so  that  you  have  to  roll less.  Now  carefully  roll  it  into  a  round  shape  about  two  and  a  half  inch  in  diameter.  Deep  fry  both  sides,  till  very  light  yellow  colour.  Collect  them  on  paper  towels  to  get  rid  of  the  extra  oil.

Serve  them  with  any  light  vegetable.  Aloor  dawm,  (recipe  coming  later),  is  the  dish  of  choice.  In  my  household,  we  prefer  with  pickles  or  with  no  side  at  all.

Inside  scoop;

It  does  need  some  practise,  to  roll  them  into  perfect  circles,  just  like  anything  else.  Please  do  not  get  discouraged  if  it  doesn’t  work  out  the  first  time.

There  are  many  variations  to  the  filling,  we  like  with  minimum  spices  to  get  the   sweet  taste  of  peas  as  is.

I  used  frozen  peas  for convenience.  In  Dida’s  house  we  shelled  the  fresh  peas  then  steamed  them.

I  usually  keep it  for  my  cheat  days.  Can’t  avoid  deep  fried  stuff  altogether,  can  we?