Kaju Katli: Cashew fudge, GF, DF

Image

By  Ratna,

untitled-4

I  just  read  this  article  in  Saveur  “15  Indian  desserts  that  give  you  a  tour  of  the  country “.  Indian  sweets  are  anything  but  boring.  I  totally  agree  with  the  editors.  The  sweets  can  be  dry  or  dripping  with  syrup,  milk  or  flour  based,  a  vegetable  or  fruit  can  be  the  star  ingredient,  most  of  them  are  even  eggless,  respecting  the  vegetarians.

untitled-3

Did  you  know  that  sweets  can  be  coated  by  gold  or  silver  leaf?  If  you  have  come  across  some  pictures  of  Indian  movies  or  festivals,  I  bet  you  have  noticed  that  we  like  the  “Bling”.  This  affinity  is  so  strong  that  we  even  like  our  food “Blinged”?  Yup.  You  heard  that  right.

untitled-5

Festivals  are  incomplete  without  dessert.  Coating  the  desserts  with  a  silver  leaf  also  known  as  “Vark”,  is  quite  common.  This  is  what  I  tried  for  Diwali  this  year.  Cashew  fudges  covered  with  edible  silver  foil.  Kept  in  an  airtight  container  it  will  safely  store  for  two  weeks.  Make  ahead  recipes  always  come  handy  wouldn’t  you  agree?

untitled-2

Recipe:    Adapted from In house recipes.

Made  about  30-35  pieces.

Ingedients;

Raw,  unsalted  Cashews                                       2  cups ground  fine

Sugar                                                                     1  cup

Water                                                                      1/3  cup

Cardamom  powder                                                 1/2  tsp

Vark   (  optional  )                                                   Two  sheets,  about  6  cms  squared

Method;

Take  the  sugar,  water  and  cardamom  powder  in  a  nonstick  pan  on  high  heat,  till  it  comes  to  a  boil.  Crank  the  heat  down  to  medium  and  let  the  syrup  thicken,  about  3  minutes.  Turn  the  gas  down  to  low  now.  Add  the  cashew  powder.  Keep  stirring  so  that  it  is  lump  free,  doesn’t  stick  to  the  bottom  of  the  pan  and  start  leaving  the  sides  of  the  pan,  about  3  minutes.  Turn  the  gas  off.

Pour  this  mixture  on  a  greased  wax  paper.  Take  another  greased  wax  paper  and  put  it  on  top  of  the  mixture.  Put  the  palm  of  your  hand  on  the  second  wax  paper  and  flatten  it.  Gently  use  a  rolling  pin  to  spread  it  out,  preferably  to  a    square  shape  about  1/3  rd  centimetre  thick.  Remove  the  top  wax  sheet.  Take  a  Pizza  cutter  or  sharp  knife  and  cut  it  in  diamond  shape.

Carry  the  “Vark”  on  the  paper  it  came  with  and  drop  it  gently  on  this  spread.  Press  the  “Vark”  softly  on  to  this  mixture  to  help  stick.  Take  a  sharp  knife  and  gently  run  the  cuts  over  the  Vark  again.  Tease  out  the  pieces  and  enjoy.

Inside  scoop;

Vark  or  edible  silver  foil  is  available  through  Amazon.com.

You  can  cover  all  the  pieces  with  the  Vark, I  have  used  for  a  few  only.

 

Sabudana kheer: Tapioca pearls and coconut milk pudding with Raspberry syrup. DF

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-3

untitled-6We  had  snow  twice  already.  It  didn’t  stay  though.  The  garden  is  now  full  of  yellow  leaves  some  naked  branches,  an  errant  flower  in  a  corner  in  between  a  bunch  of  dead  stems.  The  raspberry  patch  is  a  different  story  altogether.  These  autumn  raspberries  are  flourishing  everyday  like  rebels. The  fruit  heavy  branches  bowed  downwards,   swaying  sideways  with  gentle  wind…

untitled-7

Navaratri  or  nine  nights  is  celebrating  the  feminine  form  of  the  divine.  Devotees  partake  food  with  no  grains  for  each  of  these  nine  days.  Sabudana  which  is  granules  made  from  Tapioca  root  is  an  acceptable  form  of  nutrition.

untitled-3

I  was  looking  for  ways  to  use  up  my  raspberries.  I  made  a  syrup  from  them  and  layered  this  with  the  Sabudana  pudding.  A  nice  garnish  on  top,  and  voilla,  we  had  fusion  dessert  here.

untitled-4untitled-5

Recipe:  

Serves  6.

Ingredients:

Sabudana ( Tapioca  pearls ),  washed  with  water                                    1/3 cup

Coconut  milk  ( Can  from  Aroy  D  )                                                           2  cups

Cardamom  powder                                                                                    1/2  tsp

Raspberries  washed                                                                                   2 1/4  cups

Sugar                                                                                                          1/3  &  2/3  cup

Cornstarch                                                                                                  2  Tbsps

Water                                                                                                          1/2  cup

Coconut  slivers                                                                                           few  to  garnish

Method;

Mix  the  cornstarch  and  water  into  a  lump  free  slurry.  Put  the  raspberries  in  a  blender  and  make  a  puree.  Take  this  puree,  cornstarch  mixture  and  1/3  rd  cup  sugar  in  a  pan  over  medium  heat.  Make  it  into  a  thick  sauce,  about  5  minutes.  Put  the  gas  off.

Boil  the  Sabudana  with  half  cup  water  on  a  medium  flame  till  soft,  about  7  minutes.  Add  the  coconut  milk,  Cardamom  powder  and  2/3  cup  sugar.  Simmer  on  low  medium  flame  for  about  20  minutes,  stirring  sometimes.  The  Sabudana  will  turn  translucent,  some  will  blend  in  the  milk,  thickening  it.  Turn  the  gas  off.

You  can  serve  it  hot.  I  assembled  it  in  layers.  Garnish  with  a  few  whole  Raspberries  and  Coconut  slivers.

Inside  Scoop;

Sabudana  can  be  purchased  from  Indian  grocery  store.

The  botanical  name  for  Tapioca  is  Manihot  Esculenta  Crantz  syn.  Utilissima.

Subzi wale makki roti: Vegetables and cornflour flatbread. GF

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-3

October  12th  was   Pitri  Paksha,  which  translates  to  The  fortnight  of  the  Ancestors.  This  new  moon  day  we  show  gratitude  to  our  ancestors.  Not  only  do  we  owe  our  existence  to  them,  it  is  due  to  their  contribution  that  we  enjoy  everything  else  in  this  world.  We  are  ourselves  because  of  the  gifts  that  we  have  received  from  them.  If  we  broaden  the  definition  of  the  term  ancestors,  from  our  parents  or  grandparents  to  the  whole  humanity,  then  we  have  even  more  reason  to  be  thankful.  The  clothes  we  wear,  the  food  we  enjoy,  the  technology  we  use,  the  way  we  entertain  ourselves,  have  all  come  down  from  ‘the  ancestors.’  It  is  only  natural  that  we  sometimes  pause  in  our  life,  bow  our  heads  in  gratitude  and  pay  our  debts  to  them

untitled

The  ritual  involves  offering  water  to  their  soul.  The  fresh  harvest,  a  symbolic  gesture  for  food,  is  also  offered.

We  celebrated  Thanksgiving  in  Canada  on  the  12th.  It  is  a  day  we  thank  the  almighty  God  for  the  bountiful  harvest  with  which  we  have  been  blessed.  Families  get  together  for  sumptuous  feasts,  parades  are  held  and  pumpkin  pies  are  baked  to  celebrate  the  day.

Two  faraway  countries,  India  and  Canada,  but  similar  traditions.

untitled-2

I  had  carrots  and  beets  freshly  harvested  from  the  garden.  Instead  of  pies  I  worked  them  into  flatbreads.  With  crunchy  radishes  or  smooth  yoghurt  and  some  fierce  pickles  for  a  side,  it  made  an  excellent  brunch  menu.

Recipe:  From  my  friend  Parul.

Made  4  pieces.

Ingredients;

Grated  carrots                                                 1/4 th cup

Grated  beets                                                    1/4 th cup

Grated  Cauliflower                                            1/4 th  cup

Corn  flour  ( see  notes )                                    1  cup

Cream                                                               1/2  cup

Salt                                                                    To  taste

Pepper                                                              To  taste

Method.

Mix  all  the  dry  ingredients  together  in  a  bowl.  Pour  the  cream  to  make  it  into  a  soft  dough.  Divide  them  into  four  equal  parts  to  form  lemon  size  balls.  Line  the  countertop  with  a  piece  of  wax  paper.  Roll  the  ball  gently  in  a  circle,  3  inches  diameter  circle.  Take  care,  for  the  absence  of  gluten  makes  it  hard to  bind.

With  the  help  of  a  flat  spatula  transfer  this  on  to  a  greased  heated  frying  pan  on  medium  heat.  After  about  a  minute,  gently  flip  it  over.  Put  a  teaspoon  of  oil  on  it.  Gently  press  the  surface  with  the spatula  and  rotate  the  bread  on  the  pan.  Repeat  the  same  with  the  other  side  until  lightly  crispy,  about  8  minutes  total.

Serve  hot  with  a  dollop  of  butter on  top,

Inside  Scoop;

While  rolling  the  dough,  run  the  pin  to  one  side  ( say  north ),  lift  the  pin,  bring  it  to  the  middle,  now  roll  it  to  the  other  side  ( say  south ).  Rotate  the  wax  paper  and  repeat  the  above  procedure.

If  you  see  the  sides  are  not  as  smooth,  tuck  them  in  with  wet  finger.

Traditionally  it  is  served  with  Saag  (  leafy  greens  ).  However  potato  or  any  other  curry  goes  well  too.

It  could  be  done  just  plain  without  any  veggies  too.

I  have  used  this  brand  of  cornflour  “Punjabi  Makki de  Atta  PTI”.

I  have  referred  to  Wikipedia  and  Isha  foundation  blog  for  the  details  on  Pitri  paksha.

 

 

 

 

 

Masala Chai: Spiced tea, for a fall day

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-11

‘Did  you  notice  the  leaves  turning  yellow?”  commented  J,  my  colleague  at  work.  That  was  middle  of  August.  “You  are  not  saying  what  you  are  saying,  are  you?’  I  retorted.  I  strengthened  my  argument  by  putting  forward  the  other  causes  of  leaves  turning  yellow,  for  example  drought.  Who  was  I  kidding  though.  I  knew  for  certain  that  it  was  the  beginning  of  fall.  It  didn’t  matter  that  people  were  still  on  summer  holidays,  that  the  snow  just  melted  not  that  long  ago  or  even  the  official  ‘fall’  was  still  more  than  a  month  away.  This  was  northern  Canada.  It  is  said  if  you  blink  long  enough  you  may  miss  the  summer!

untitled-4untitled-6

Come  September  there  was  no  denying  that  it  was  not  drought  that  caused  the  yellow  leaves,  the  summer  was  done  for  this  year.  There  was  a  chill  in  the  air.  Vegetable  gardens  were  harvested,  apple  pies  were  baked,  fleece  jackets  were  back  and  Costco  proudly  displayed  their  Halloween  supplies.

untitled-3untitled-5Now  Chai  ( Tea ),  doesn’t  need  a  season  to  be  enjoyed.  There  is  no  denying  the  magic  of  a  hot  cup  of  tea  on  a  cold  day  though.  N  and  I  packed  some  tea  and snacks  before  we  went  out  for  a  short  drive  to  take  in  the  colours  of  fall.  There was  yellow  and  red  and  everything  in  between.  It  was  as  if  the  nature’s  way  to  go  on  an  overdrive   with  colours,  for  the  next  six  months  will  be  only  white,  and  more  white.  The  calm  before  the  storm…

untitled-10

Tea  is  something  that  memory  is  made  out  of.  Who  can  forget  the  the  night  of  burning  midnight  oil  to  prepare  for  the  exam  next  morning,  when  the  cup  of  tea  is  your  loyal  friend.  Tea  is  needed  to  start  the  day,  at  the  end  of  a  hard  day’s  work.  What  about  that  boring  day  when  nothing  seems  to  be  in  your  favour?  Tea  is  what  we  break  a  bad  news  over  or  break  the  ice  with.  I  can’t  forget  how  as  teenagers  we  giggled  just  because  our  Uncle  R  slurped  his  tea  or  Aunty  P  blew  her  hot  tea  so  hard  that  we  all  avoided  sitting  next  to  her  to  save  our  dresses!

Here  it  is  friends.  This  is  how  we  enjoy  the  cuppa!

untitled-2

Recipe:

Serves  2.

Ingredients;

Tea  bags  ( Lipton’s  yellow  label )                                  Two

Cardamom  pods,  crushed                                              Two

Evaporated  milk                                                              Half  cup

Cinnamon  sticks                                                              Two

Granulated  Sugar                                                            Two  tsps

Water                                                                              One  and  half  cup

Method;

Bring  the  water  with  the  crushed  cardamom  to  boil,  about  4  minutes.  Throw  in  the  tea  bags,  continue  boiling  for  another  2   minutes..  Add  the  milk.  The  boiling  will  stop  temporarily.  Bring  it  to  boil  again,  about  a  minute,  taking  care  not  to  let  the  mixture  spill  over.  Turn  the  gas  to  medium  and  get  another  boil,  if  needed  turn  the  gas  lower  to  avoid  the  spill.

In  a  mug  take  a  teaspoon  of  sugar.  Pour  the  tea  into  the  mug  through  a  sieve.  Garnish  with  a  Cinnamon  stick  and  serve  piping  hot.

Take  away  the  cinnamon  stick  before  drinking.

Inside  Scoop;

White  sugar  can  be  substituted  with  Palm  sugar,  honey,  Splenda,  brown  sugar  or  any  other  sweetener  of  your  choice.

Grated  ginger  can  be  added  with  the  boiling  water  for  Adrak  ( Ginger  )  tea.

Every  family  has  their  favourite  blend  of  spice.  Apart  from  cardamom  and  cinnamon,  mace  or  even  a  combination  of  spices  are  sometimes  added.

Try  and  adjust  to  your  taste.

I  prefer  evaporated  milk  or  Homo  milk.  One  can  also  go  with  cream.

 

Chickoo ( Manilkara Zapota ) and almond shake. GF with DF option

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-5

What  shake?  I  know  your  thoughts,  exactly.  Chickoo,  Sapota.  Nope,  never  heard  that  before.  Well,  I  don’t  blame  you.  It  grows  only  in  tropical  climates  like  India,  Thailand,  Vietnam,  Southern  Mexico,  Central  America.  It  has  been  cultivated  in  Florida  in  the  US.

I  was  in  the  city  recently.  The  food  blogger  inside  me  always  likes  to  visit  ethnic  supermarkets.  I  like  trying  new  or  revisit  old  favourites.  This  was  my  find  this  time.untitled-3

This  brown  beauty  is  like  a  big  berry.  Inside  the  plain  skin  is  the  sweet,  meaty  and  a  bit  grainy  pulp.  Tease  the  few  long  black  seeds  out  and  you  are  ready  to  enjoy  the  fruit.

untitled-2

It  did  bring  back  memories  of  long  summers  years  back.  Not  only  was  the  market  flooded  with  Sapotas,  but   also  tribal  women  street  vendors  were  seen carrying  deep  wicker  baskets  filled  with  these  fruits  on  their  heads .  Defying  the  mid  day  heat  they  would  ferry  their  wares  calling  out  ”  Sapota  paka,  libi  go.”  Ripe  Sapotas,  anybody…

untitled-8

Next  time  you  see  these  unfamiliar  fruit,  do  not  shy  away.  Abundant  in  fructose  and  fibre  it  is  good  for  the  bowels.  It  contains  Tannins,  the  polyphenolic  antioxidant.  There  is  Vit  C,  minerals  like  Iron,  Calcium  and  Magnesium.  So  let  the  boring  exterior  not  fool  you.  As  is  said,  don’t  judge  the  book  by  its  cover.

Recipe:  Yielded  two  long  glasses

Ingredients;

Chickoo,  skinned,  pitted  and  cut  in  pieces                       2  cups

Homo  milk                                                                             2  cups

Honey                                                                                     1 Tbsp

Almond  pieces                                                                       2  Tbsps

Method;

Put  all  the  above  ingredients  in  a  blender  and  enjoy.  I  did  not  add  any  ice  cubes  here,  but  feel  free  to  add  it.  Garnish  with  almond  flakes.

Inside  Scoop;

Adjust  the  thickness of  the  smoothie  to  your  choice.  Some  like  it  runny,  I  like  it  thick,  you  may  even  need  a  spoon  to  enjoy.

Substitute  with  coconut  milk  for  DF  option.

Sour Cherry Jam

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-8

It  popped.  It  really  did.

Canning,  preserving,  or  making  jams  is  something  I  stayed  away  from,  for  the  longest  time.  I  always  thought  it  was  a  very  unforgiving  procedure.  The  faliure  would  manifest  not  right  away  but  much  later,  the  day  when  you  open  the  jar  to  taste  the  jam.

untitled-7

This  year  my  sour  Cherry  tree  prompted  me  to  do  otherwise.  We  had  a  bumper  crop.  We  enjoyed  them  with  squinted  eyes,  took  them  to  work,  to  my  friends  and  neighbour’s  place.  The  birds  had  their  share.  We  still  had  leftovers.

untitled-3I  had  no  other  choice  but  to  delve  into  the  virtual  world  to  look  for  recipes  for  Sour  cherries.  As  soon  as  I  let  my  intention  and  lack of experience  out,  at  work,  I  got  friendly  advice  from  all  quarters.  ”  I  just  saw  cherry  pitter  was  on  sale  at  Superstore’  said  one. “Whatever  you  do  make  sure  the  jars  are  bone  dry”,  warned  another.  “Bernardin”  mason  jars  were  purchased  by  the  dozens.

untitled-4

My  hair  pulled  back  in  a  ponytail,  glasses  perched  on  my  nose,  I  worked  like  a  machine.  The  cherry  pitter  was  put  to  use.  Stockpots  were  filled  with  water.  The  counter  top  of  my  kitchen  did  not  have  any  room  left.  Measuring  cups,  funnel,  metal  tongs,  small  plates  for  “gel  test’,  mounds  of  cherry  seeds,  sugar  jar,  squeezed  lemon  skin,  kitchen  towels  and  more  kitchen  towels,  it  was  a  scene  from  a  crazy  laboratory.  My  poor  husband  played  it  safe.  He  crossed  the  periphery  of  the  kitchen  a  few  times  without  saying  a  word.

untitled

As  the  last  of  the  jam  filled  jars  were  put on  the  counter  top,  It  was  way  beyond  supper  time.  We  sat  for  supper  in  silence,  eyes  fixed  on  the  jars.  Then,  just  then,  I  heard  the  sweetest  sound.  It  popped.  The  lids  were  vacuum  sealed .  I  passed!  That  was  exactly  my  feeling.

untitled-6

Recipe:  Adapted  from  Martha  Stewart’s  recipe  with  minor  changes.

Yield:  Two  and  a  half  250  ml  Mason  jars.

Ingredients;

Evan’s Sour  Cherries,  washed  and  pitted                               Eight  Cups

Sugar                                                                                          Four  cups

Juice  from  one  lemon

Method;

Place  a  round  wire  rack  in  the  bottom  of  a  large  stockpot.  Stand  three  jars  on  the  rack.  Add  the  lids  to  the  pot.  Fill  it  up  with  water,  completely  immersing  the  jars.  Be  sure  to  leave  about  two inches  space  from  the  rim  of  the  stockpot,  so  that  water  does  not  overflow.  Simmer  at  about  180  degrees,  until  you  are  ready  to  fill  them  with  the  jam.  Place  a  couple  small  plates  in  the  freezer.

In  another  medium  stockpot  combine  the  cherries,  sugar  and  lemon  juice.  Bring  it  to  a  full  boil.  Stir  frequently  to  avoid  sticking  to  the  bottom  of  the  pot.  It  took  about  one  and  half  hour  for  this  to  thicken  to  a  jam  like  consistency.  Do  the  ‘gel  test’  now.

Take  one  plate  out  from  the  freezer  and  put  a  spoonful  of  jam  on  it.  Return  it  to  the  freezer.  Wait  for  a  minute  and  take  it  out.  With  your  finger  push  the  edge  of  the  jam,  it  will  wrinkle  if  done.  If  not,  continue   boiling  and  repeat  the  gel  test  until  ready.

Take  the  jars  out  from  the  stockpot  using  tongs.  Empty  the  water  back  in  the  stockpot.  Similarly  take  the  lids  and  screw  out  of  the  stockpot.  Put  a  clean  funnel  inside  the  jar  and  fill  it  with  jam  using  a  ladle.  Leave  about  half  inch  space  from  the  rim.  Fill  all  the  jars.  Cover  the  lid,  sealant  side  down.  Put  the  screw  in  firmly.  Return  all  the  filled  jars  back  inside  the  water  bath  with  the  help  of  a  tong.  Make  sure  the  filled  and  closed  jars  have  about  an  inch  of  water  above  their  lids.  Let  the  water  boil.  After  about  10  minutes   take  these  jars  out  with  the  tongs.  Let  it  sit  on  the  counter  for  24  hours.  As  it  cools  you  will  hear  a  popping  sound.  The  bottles  are  now  vacuum  sealed.

Store  them  in  a  cool  and  dry  place.  It  can  be  enjoyed  for  a  year.

Inside  Scoop;

I  used  a  cherry  pitter  to  take  the  seeds  out.  I  felt  I  could  do  without  it.  I  did  need  my  hand  anyways.

Do  not  throw  away  the  seeds.  It  can  be  made  into  a  small  bean  bag.  Throw  it  in  the  microwave  for  a  couple  of  minutes  and  use  it  as  a  hot  pack.

How to make natural food colours using vegetables and an eggless chocolate cupcake.

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-7untitled-8

Imagine  a  world  without colour.  Just  close  your  eyes  and  try.  It  is  hard,  isn’t  it  ? We  live  in  a  world  of  colours.  The  beautiful  flowers,  sweet  fruits,  birds,  attract  us  with  their  myriad  and  brilliant  colours.

Research  has  shown   that  we  prefer  coloured  things  over  white,  even  as  a  child.  Taking  this  further  we  started  incorporating  colours  in  our  food.  Take  for  example  ‘Smarties’  and M&M.  Their  dazzling  variety  attract  young  and  old  alike.

Adding  colour  to  food  to  make  it  more  attractive  is  by  no  means  unacceptable.    .  What  is  harmful  are  the  artificial  colourings.  More  and  more  research  indicates  a  direct  link  between  certain  food  colourings  and  Cancer,  ADHD  in  children  etc.  You  can  read  about  them  here,  here,  and  here.

how to make natural food colours from vegetables-3

Saveur  had  an  excellent  article  showing  how  natural  food  colours  can  be  made   using  vegetables.  They  made  pink  frosting  using  Beets.  Taking  that  as  an  inspiration  I  tried  using  carrots  and  Spinach  leaves  to  make  yellow  and  green  food  colours  respectively.

how to make natural food colours from vegetables-4

What  is  coloured  frostings  without  cupcakes?  So  here  you  go  –  chocolate  cupcakes  with  coloured  frostings.

untitled-4

A  match  made  in  heaven.

Recipe:

Pink  food  colour,

Spread  1  lb  peeled  beets,  sliced  paper  thin,  on  a  Silpat  lined  baking  sheet  and  bake  at  200  degrees  F  for  2  hours.  Place  dried  beet  slices  in  a  food  processor  and  puree  until  finely  ground.  Made  two  Tbsps.

Yellow  food  colour,

Follow  exactly  the  same  procedure  with  carrots.

Green  food  colour

I  took  two  cups  of  Spinach  leaves,  and  followed  the  same  procedure.  I  got  about  one  and  half  Tbsp  of  colour.

Eggless  Chocolate  cupcake

(Adapted  from  Eugenie  kitchen ).  Made  9  cupcakes.

Ingredients;

All  purpose  flour                                                        3/4 cup

Baking soda                                                                1/4  tsp

Baking powder                                                            1  tsp

Salt                                                                              1/4  tsp

Unsweetened  cocoa  powder                                     3  Tbsps

Unsalted  butter,  softened                                          3  Tbsps

Granulated  sugar                                                       1/2  cup

Pure  vanilla  extract                                                   1/4  tsp

Milk                                                                            1/2  cup  and  extra

Yellow  Buttercream  frosting;

Unsalted  butter,  softened                                          1/3  cup

Icing  sugar,  sifted                                                        1  cup

Yellow  food  colour                                                       1  tsp

Milk,  to  adjust                                                             1  or  2  Tbsps

Pistachio  nuts,  chopped                                              2  Tbsps

Method;

Preheat  oven  to  360  degrees  F.

Sift  the  dry  ingredients  like  flour,   baking  powder,  baking  soda,  salt  and  cocoa  powder  together  and  set  aside.

In  a  mixing  bowl,  add  the  softened,  unsalted  butter  and  spread  with  a  spatula.  Add  the  granulated  sugar  and  whisk  till  light  and  fluffy.  Throw  in  the  pure  vanilla  extract  next  and  stir  till  combined.

Add  in  only  a  half  of  the  sifted  dry  ingredients  in  half  of  milk.  Whisk  till  homogenous.  Add  the  remaining  dry  ingredients  and   milk.  Stir  again  till  smooth.  Adjust  the  thickness  of  the  batter,  if  needed  with  one  or  two  Tbsp  of  milk.

Divide  the  batter  in  cupcake  molds.  Fill  only  about  two  thirds  full.  Bake  for  20  mts.  Once  out  of  the  oven,  let  them  cool  completely  on  a  wire  rack.

Frosting;

In  a  mixing  bowl  add  in  softened  unsalted  butter  and  spread  out  with  a  spatula.  Fold  in  the  yellow  food  colour  that  we  made  before.  Mix  till  smooth.  Sift  in  half the  icing  sugar  and  mix.  Then  add  the  remaining  sugar,  mix  till  smooth.  Adjust  thickness  if  needed  with  milk.

Decorate  with  Pastry  tip.  I  used  Wilton  22.  Start  piping  in  the  middle  and  slowly  make  concentric  circles  until  the  top  is  covered.  Garnish  with  chopped  Pistachio  nuts.

Enjoy!

Inside  Scoop;

The  home  made  food  colour  can  be  stored  in  plastic  containers  in  a  fridge.

Apart  from  colouring  frostings  it  can  also  be  used  in  other  foods  to  accentuate  the  colour.