Kalakand: Milk Cake

Image

By  Ratna

kalakand

We  didn’t  say  “trick  or  treat”  or  dress up  in  scary  costume.  The  days  after  Durga  Pujo  were  for  visiting  all  our  neighbours  and  showing  them  Pranam  ( respect ).  Just  doing  that  would  mean  we  would  be  treated  with  delicious  snacks  or  dessert  or  even  a  full  meal.  It  was  not  just  an  evening  either.  You  had  about  a  whole  week  for  that.  It  was  no  surprise  that  we  played  our  cards  right.  We  would  sit  down  with  our  friends  to  make  a  fool  proof  plan.  We  divided  the  neighbourhood  houses  into  different  zones.  A  couple  in  the  morning  a  couple  in  the  evening.  Any  ‘insider  information’  on  the  nature  of  snack  offered  in  a  particular  house  could  alter  our  plan  accordingly.  How  I  remember  those  fun  filled  days…

kalakand-2

Durga  Puja  is  celebrated  in  India   around  September  or  October.  Godess  Durga  is  Shakti  ( power).  She  emerges  victorious  after  her  fights  with  the  demon  Mahishashur.  Now  that  is  a  reason  to  celebrate.  The  festivities  goes  on  for  nine  days.  New  clothes,  no  studies,  fasting  and  feasting  are  the  hallmark  of  Durgapujo.  Even  the  weather  cooperates  with  mild  temperatures  making  it  a  magical  time  of the year.

Nobody  made  sweets  like  Bowneer  Thakuma  (  Bownee’s  Granma ).  Be  it   one   dunked  in  syrup  or  just  dry  Barfi   (  fudge  ).  Her  house  was  on  our  ‘priority  list.’  Oma  dekhi  kawto  bawro  holi,  O  my  look  how  much  you’ve  grown,  she  said  adjusting  the  end  of  her  sari  which  had  a  bunch  of  keys  tied  to  it.  Always  in  crisp  white  sari  with  no  border  she  savoured  the  moments  as  she  watched  us  savour  her  sweets.  Too  young  to  worry  about   why  she  wore  only  crisp  white,  we  licked  our  plates  clean.  It  was much  later  that  I  found  out  that  it  was  the  societies  requirement  that  she  be  dressed  in  a  particular  way  or  change  her  eating  habits  just  because  her  husband  was  no  more.  How  this  cruel  societal  bias   could  never  take  away  the  smile  from  her  crinkly  face,  the  love  to  go  through  the  elaborate  cooking  to  see  others  happy,  amazed  me.

Kalakand  or  milk  fudge is  usually  done  from whole  milk  in  India.  It  usually  takes  hours  over  slow  flame  to  get  it  right.  Thanks  to  Ricotta  cheese,  making  Kalakand  can  be  a  breeze  now.

kalakand-3

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Ricotta  cheese                         Saputo  light  500gm  tub.

Condensed  milk                       Eagle  brand  300  ml  tin.

Pistachio  nuts                           Handful  Chopped.

Cardamom  powder                  One  eighth  tsp

Method;

Empty  the  cheese  in  a cheese  cloth  and  let  it drain for  about  half  hour.  Now  mix  this  cheese  and  condensed  milk  in  a  microwave  safe  deep  bowl.  Cover  and  cook  for  5  minutes  on  high.  Stir  and  let  it  sit  for  two minutes.  Repeat  the  process  again   for  5  minutes. Stir  and  let  it  sit  for  two  minutes.  This  time  cook  for  one  minute  intervals,  stirring  in  between  for  a  total  10  minutes.  Add  the  cardamom  powder.  Mix  well.

Transfer  this  to  a  greased  square  pan.  Make  square  cuts  so  that  the  pieces  are  about  an  inch  square. Refrigerate  for  half  hour.  Garnish  with  chopped  pistachio  nuts  and  serve.

Inside  Scoop

The  aim  of  the  above  procedure  is  to  achieve  a  soft  dough.  The  time  of  cooking  can  be  used  as  a  guide,  depending  on  the  humidity,  brand  of  cheese,  it  may  need  to  be  tweaked  a  bit.

The  mixture  tends  to  sputter,  so  cover  it  with  a  microwave  cover  with  vents.

The  final  result  is  a  granular  texture  as  shown  in  the  picture,  not  creamy  and  smooth.

Traditionally  Kalakand  is  not  too  sweet.  It  is  ok  to  play  with   the   amount  of  condensed  milk  in  the  recipe.

I  wouldn’t   slack  on  stirring  as  it  prevents  the  milk  solids  from  sticking  to  the  pan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bhejitabil Chawp : Spicy Vegetable Croquet.

By  Ratna

bhejitabil chop blog-4

The  train  came  to  a  sudden  halt,  waking  me  up. Rubbing  my  eyes  I  look  out  of  the  window  to  figure  out  where  we  were.  A  smallish  station  with  busy  vendors. Steaming  cups  of  tea,  pre packed  snacks  exchanging  hands.  A  fruit  seller  with  bananas  and  oranges  at  a  distance,  a  thick  scarf  covering  his  ears  and  head.

.bhejitabil chop blog-2

We  were  making  the  four  hour  train  journey  from  Howrah  to  Tatanagar  in  India. With  the  schools  closed  for  December  holidays  there  were  lots  of  families  with  young  children  travelling.  The  fleeting  landscape  outside  was  different  shades  of  green.  Green  grass,  green  trees  with  climbers  wrapped  around,  green  fields,  even  the  lakes  and  ponds  which  were  so  abundant  had  green  plants  covering  the  surface.

beetrootblog

A  steady  stream  of  hawkers  made  their  rounds.  Newspapers,  magazines  with  special  deals,  incense  sticks  with  promises  of  one  of  a  kind  fragrance.  Mobile  shoe  shine,  a  blind  man  with  outstretched  arm  seeking  pennies,  his  melodious  voice  reminding  us  how  good  deeds  in  life  are  always  paid  back  tenfold  by  the  almighty.  His  other  arm  resting  on  the  shoulder  of  a  barefooted  little  girl .The  song  definitely  had  an  impact  for  I  heard  the  clinking  of  the  coins  against  his  tin  can.

The  train  had  left  the  station  and  was  slowly  moving out.  A  spicy  aroma  was  followed  by  a  skinny  man  with  a  big  wicker  basket  hanging  around  his  neck.  A  red  cloth  covered  the  snacks,  with  an  assortment  of  small  tin  containers  neatly  arranged  around  the  periphery  of  the  basket.  It  was  hard  not  to  give  in. The  family  sitting  right  across,  enquired  the  price.  There  was  a  brief  conversation  accusing  the  vendor  of  his  cut  throat  prices .  The  vegetable  prices  had  skyrocketed  he  mumbled  in  his  defence.  The  deal  did  go  through  with   my  fellow  passengers  carefully  balancing  the  ‘Chawps’  on  a  bowl  made  from  dried  leaves.

bhejitabil chop blog-6

We  were  not  allowed  food  from  these  vendors  with  questionable  hygiene.   Looking  away  was  not  helping  as  the  overwhelming  aroma  and  the  sound  of  crunchy  onions  or  peanuts  was  causing  my  mouth  to  water. I  still  made  a  feeble  attempt  and  looked at  Baba.  He  nodded  his  head  to  reinforce  what  I  already  knew.  Ma however  promised  that  she  would  make  it  for  us  when  we  reached  home.  And  she  did !  With  a  hot  cup  of  tea  these ‘ vegetable  chawps’,  are  to  die  for.  With  the  abundance  of  root  vegetables  during  the  winter  months  this  snack  was  a  regular  in  our  house.

It  is  not  winter  here  in  the  Prairies  yet.  September  brought  some  snow  though,  would  you  believe?  It  didn’t last,  but  prompted  me  to  get  my  hand  shaping  these  ‘Chawps’

bhejitabil chop blogbhejitabil chop blog-7

What  are  your  favourite  snacks  while  travelling.  I’d  love  to  hear  from you.  Do  drop me  a  line.

Recipe;

Ingredients;

Beetroots                                                Two  large.

Carrots                                                    Two

Potatoes                                                  Two

Peanuts                                                   One  Tbsp

Raisins                                                     One  Tbsp

Ginger                                                      One  inch  grated.

All  purpose  flour                                    Two  Tbsp

Breadcrumbs                                           One  packet.  I  used  Panko.

Canola  oil                                               Two  cups  for  frying.

Onion                                                      One  cut  in  thin  julienne.

Salt                                                         To  taste

Spices,

Cumin  seeds                                   One  and  half  tsp

Fennel  seeds                                   One  and  half  tsp

Red  chilli  powder                            One  tsp

 

Method;

Put  the  potatoes  and  beetroots  in  a  pressure  cooker  skin  on,  wait  for  two  whistles,  turn  the  gas  off.  Let  it  cool  down.  Skin  the  vegetables.  Mash  the  potatoes, grate  the  beetroots.  Skin  the  raw  carrots  and  grate  them.  Keep  them  aside.

Dry  roast  the ones  listed  under  Spices,  grind  and  set  aside.

Take  a  pan  with  one  Tbsp  of  canola  oil  on  high  heat  and  throw  the  peanuts  in.  Fry  for  a  few  minutes  till  they  get  some  colour  then  add  the  raisins.  Add  the  vegetables  soon  after.  Bring  the  heat  to medium  now.  Saute  for  a  few  minutes,  add  the  ground  spices  and  salt.  It  is  done  when  the  mixture  is  all  dry  or  all  the  moisture  is  gone.  Put  the  gas  off  and  let  it  cool  down.

Make  a  slurry  with  the  flour  and  water.  Spread  the  breadcrumbs  on  a  newspaper  sheet. Take  a  handful  of  the  above  mixture  and  form  an  inch  and  half   cylinder  with  your  hand.  Dip  these  first  in  the  flour  slurry  then  in  the  breadcrumbs  so  they  are  coated  evenly.  Dip  in  the  slurry  and  breadcrumbs   a  second  time.

Take  a  frying  pan  with  one  inch  deep  oil  in  it  on  high  heat.  Gently  lower  the  croquets  and  lower  the  gas  to medium.  Fry  to  a  nice  brown  colour  turning  them  carefully  so  that  it  is  done  from  all  sides.  Collect  them  on  a  tissue  paper.

To  serve  sprinkle  some  “Chat  masala’  on  the  ‘Chawps’.  A  few  slices  of  onions  on  the  side  and  Tomato  ketchup to  dip  in.

Inside  Scoop;

When  frying  the  veggies  and  spice  mixture,  taste  to  make  changes.  We  like  it  spicy. You  can  titrate  it  to  your  taste.

Chaat  Masala  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

Makes  about  12-15  depending  on  the  size.

Baba  is  the  Bengali  word  for  Dad.

 

 

Aamrar tawk (Hog Plum Chutney)

By  Ratna

Aamrar tawk for blog-6

The  weather  outside  is  definitely  not  the  same  as  it  was  couple  weeks  ago.  The  leaves  are  changing  colour.  There  is  a  chill  in the  air.  We  just  finished  harvesting  the  vegetables  from  our  our  garden.  Beets,  lettuce,  carrots  are  exchanging  hands  in  the  office.  Reminiscing  the  summer  is  our  favourite   past  time  now.  ‘This  was  one  of  the  hottest  summer  in  a  long  time’.  ‘I  grew  cucumbers  and  melons  which  hardly  do  well  in  the  Prairie  summer’.  ‘I  even  have  a  tan  like  you’,  boasted  my  caucasian  friends.  We  all  agreed  time  has  come  to  say  good  bye  to  summer.

Aamrar tawk for blog-8

I  came  across  these   ” Aamras “,  in  an  Indian  grocery  store  last  time  I  was  in  the  city.  Known  as  Hog  plum  in  English,  the  fancy  Botanical  name  being   Spondias  mombin.  Many  many  summers  ago  in  India  I  distinctly  remember  how excited  we  were  to  see  Baba  emptying  Aamras  from  his  grocery  bag.  Those  were  the days  before  plastic  bags  were  in  vogue.  We  had  separate  fabric  bags   for  vegetables  and  fish.   Smooth  green  on  the  outside  resembling  a  guava  or  even  a  green  plum  it  had  a  tough  inside.   We  knew  Ma  would  cook  a  delicious  chutney  with  the  Aamras.  A  bit  sweet ,  a  bit  tart,  just  like  chutneys  are  supposed  to  be. The  teeth  were  put  to  good  use  those  long  summer  afternoons  relishing  the  fibrous  interior.

Aamrar tawk for blog-9Aamrar tawk for blog-3

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Aamra  cut  in  small  cubes                                            Four  fruits

Coconut  grated                                                             Three  Tbsp

Jaggery   (  ground  )                                                      One  cup

Sugar                                                                             One  and  a  half  cup

Red  chillies  (  dried  )                                                     A  couple  broken  into  pieces.

Poppy  seeds  or  Khus  Khus                                       Two  Tbsps.

Grated  ginger                                                               One  tsp.

Mustard  seeds                                                             One  tsp

Canola  Oil                                                                    Half  Tbsp

Method;

Wash  the  Aamra  pieces.

In  a  pan  take  half  a  Tbsp  of  Canola  oil  on  high  heat.  Add  a  couple  of  dried  red  chillies  and  a  tsp  of  mustard  seeds.  Wait  till  the  seeds  splutter,  then  add  the  cut  pieces  of  Aamra,  and  turn  the  gas  down  to medium.  Saute  for  about  three  to  four  minutes.  Add  two  cups  of  water.  Cover  and  let  it  come  to  a  boil.

Put  the  poppy seeds  in  a  grinder  and  make  a  smooth  paste.  I  usually  dry  grind  it  then  add  water  to  make  a  thick  paste.  Keep  aside.

Add  salt,  sugar  and  jaggery  now.  Next throw  in  the  ground  poppy  seeds  paste  .  You  will  find  it  thickening  fast.  Add  the  ginger  paste  and  more  water  only  to  make  it  to  your  desired  consistency.   Put  the  gas  off.  Garnish  with  grated  coconut.

Enjoy  it  with  rice  or  as  a  dip,  slather  it  on  bread  to  get  an  exotic  taste.

Inside  Scoop;

Store  in  a  glass  jar.  Keep  in  the  fridge.  Stays  well  for  a  week.

Baba  is  the  Bengali  word  for  Dad.

Poppy  seeds  or  KhusKhus  is  available  in  Indian  Grocery  stores.  Also  known  as  Posto  in   Bengali.

The  measurements  are  to  my  taste. It  is  alright  to  tweak  it  to  yours.

Saskatoon Berry Rosewater Popsicles

By  Ratna

saskatoon berry blog

The  faint  smell  of  roses  by  the  roadside  hit  me  only  after  I  had  walked  away  a  bit.  Like  an  afterthought.  These  are  Wildroses,  growing  abundantly  in  the  bushes  in  the  Prairies.  Differing from  their  uptown  cousin  Damask  roses  in  both    looks  and  fragrance. The  single  layer  of  petals  and  the  faint  fragrance  may  indicate  how  humble  they  are.  Far  from  contrary.  Below  their  plain  looks  they  are  extremely  resilient.  Surviving  the  minus  forty  Prairie  winters,  they  come  back  year  after  year.

Saskatoon Berry popsicles blog-3Saskatoon Berry popsicles blog-6

Our  little  Prairie  town  turned  one  hundred  this  year.  This  rural  town  doesn’t  boast  of  a   skyline  with  skyscrapers.  We  have  the  grain  silo  as  the  backdrop  instead.  Lakes  fed  with  natural  spring  water  dot  the  landscape.  The  Trumpeter  Swans  nest  in  them  year  after  year.  They  bring  up  the  Cygnets  and  migrate  to  the  warmer  south  in    winter.

Saskatoon Berry popsicles blog-2

 

 

In  the  early  days  people  migrated  here  from  the  east  as  well  as  Europe.  With  limited  resources,  little  bit  of  trepidation  and  a  lot  of  determination  they  started  farming.  They  toiled  the  earth.  The  growing  season  is  short  but  the  longer  daylight  hours  rewarded  them  with  bountiful  crops.The  winters  were  harsh.  They  did  not  give  up  though.  Just  like  the  wild roses,  they  were  resilient.

Saskatoon Berry popsicles blog-4

Berries  grow  in  the  wild  here.  Blueberries,  strawberries,  Saskatoon  berries  to  name  a  few.  This  summer  has  been  very  hot.  The  fruits  did  very  well  too.  Sweet  and  juicy  you  can’t  have  enough  of  those.  We  went  to  U-pick  farms  and  Farmer’s  market  to  get  the  freshest,  juiciest  berries.

Rosewater  is  a  very  common  flavour  in  desserts  in  India. I  used  Rosewater  flavour  for  these  popsicles  which  I  made  from  locally  grown  Saskatoon  Berries.

saskatoon berry popsicles blog-9

 

saskatoon berry blog-5

Recipe:

Ingredients:

Saskatoon  berries                                                               One  cup

Greek  yoghurt                                                                      One  Tbsp

Honey                                                                                    One  Tbsp

Walnut  chopped                                                                   One  Tbsp

Lemon  juice                                                                          One  tsp

saskatoon berry blog-6

Method;

Wash  the  berries.  Blend  them  with  the  yoghurt  and  honey  in  a  blender.  Add  bit  of  water  if  needed.  Strain  the  mixture  to  get  a  smooth  residue.  Throw  in  the  walnut  pieces.  Add  the  lemon  juice  and  Rosewater  and  stir  well.

Fill  up  the  popsicle  molds  with  this  solution  using  a  funnel.  Put  them  in  the  freezer  for  24  hours.  To  remove  the  popsicles  from  the  mold,  let  it  sit  in  warm  water.  It  separates  from  the  popsicle.

Inside  Scoop:

Rosewater  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

All  measurements  can  be  tweaked  to  your  taste.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mango and Soya Chunk Summer salad

By Ratna

summer salad blog-3

I was skimming  the  pages  of  the  latest  Conde nast  Traveler  that  I  carried  with  me.  We  had  a  short  break  to  the  Canadian  rockies  for  a  couple  days.  As  I  lifted  my  face  and  looked  at  the  mountains  in  front  of  me  I  soon  realised  this  is  not  the  place  to  bury  my  face  in  the  magazine.  Adjusting  myself  in  the  deep  seats  of  the  Adirondack  chair,  I  shifted  my  gaze  in  front.  Standing  majestically  were  the  Mountain  range.

mango and soya chunk summer salad for blog-5

Although  it  was  early  August,  some  of  the  peaks  were  still  snow  capped. That  wasn’t  the  case  when  the  mountains  started  their  life  though,  few  million  years  ago,  a  blink  of  an  eye  in  geological  years. For  a  brief  moment  I  was  transported to  that  day.  The  tectonic  plates  shifting  and  grinding  against  each  other,  finally  one  plate  rising  above  the  other  giving  birth  to  what  we  see  today.  It   was  beyond  my  imagination  as  to  what  it  must  have  sounded  like.  How  searing  high  was  the  temperature?  It  boggled  my  mind.

mango and soya chunk summer salad for blog-6mango and soya chunk summer salad for blog

I  was  brought  back  to  the  present  by  a  familiar  sound. The  fresh  mountain  air  on  the  face  had  lulled  my  husband  to  sleep  He  was  snoring  comfortably  with  an  open  book  on  his  lap  and  arms  languishing  on  the  long  armrests..  The  water  in  the  lake  at  the  foot  of  the  mountains  was  as  clear  as  a  mirror.  As  the  sun  rose  higher  up  in  the  sky  the  colour  of  the  water  changed.  It  felt  like  someone  had  sprinkled  glitter  in  the  water. It  shimmered.

mango and soya chunk summer salad for blog-2

Sitting  there  that  day  I  felt  dwarfed  by  the  surroundings.  The  ” I “,  ”  Me “,  ”  Mine ”  didn’t  seem  to  have  any  meaning. I  was  put  in  my  place  in  this  universe.  A  tiny  speck  in  the  galaxy.  However  my   soul  felt  in  sync  with  the  all  encompassing  surroundings.

mango and soya chunk summer salad for blog-3.

The  rocky  sidewalks  were  home  to  some  beautiful  flora.  At  times  small  white  flowers  covered   them  while  in  other  places  the  Indian  Paintbrush  (  Castilleja  miniata )  was  in  bloom.  Their  reddish  orange  blossom  against  the  ash  coloured  rocks  was  a  painter’s  inspiration.

On  our  way  back  we  were  held  up  by  a  family  of  Bighorn  sheep.  They  had  a  family  outing,  the  young  calves  under  the  sharp  eyes  of  the  elders.  Unaware  of  the  half  mile  long  traffic  gridlock  waiting  on  either  side  of  the  road,  or  the  constant  clicks  of  cameras  from  the  lucky  visitors,  they  took  their  time  crossing    the  road.

summer salad blog

 

We  enjoyed  a  fresh  salad  in  one  of  the  quaint  cafes  nestled  by  the  lake. I  tried  to  recreate  the  same  in  my  kitchen  today  with  minor  changes.

summer salad blog-2

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Ripe  mangoes  skinned  and  chopped  small                                  Two

Skinned  and  finely  chopped  Cucumber                                         One  medium

Soya  Chunks                                                                                     Half cup

Red  onion  chopped  fine                                                                  One  and half  tsps

Roasted  and  roughly  ground  Peanuts                                            Two  tsps

Dressing:

Olive  oil                                                                                              One  Tbsp

Lemon  juice                                                                                        One tsp

Salt                                                                                                        To  taste

Garnish:

Roasted  ground  cumin  seeds                                                      One tsp

Mint  leaves                                                                                      A  few

Method;

Soak  the  Soya  chunks  in  a  bowl  with  boiling  hot  water.  Cover and  let  it  sit  for  ten  minutes.  Drain  the  water  and  chop  them  in  half.

In  a  bowl  assemble  the  mango,  cucumber,  soya  chunks  and  red  onion  pieces.

Throw  in  the  peanut  pieces,  drizzle  the  garnish.  Give  a  good  stir.  Add  the  garnish.

Inside  Scoop;

All  measurements  are  to  my  taste,  it  can  be  altered  to  suit yours.

Soya  chunks  are  available  in  Indian  grocery  store  as  Nutri  Nuggets.  It  is  considered  vegetarian  meat.  The  chewy  texture  imparts  a  similar  taste  and  can  even   be  substituted  in  any  recipe  calling  for  meat.  They  are  high  in  protein.

The  mangos  were  quite  sweet.  A  bit  of  honey  can  be  added  to  the  dressing  if  it  is  tart.

 

Mawtor dal bhate (Mashed and Spiced Yellow Split Peas)

By Ratna

mawtor dal bhate-4

Painting  the  landscape  around  my  neighbourhood  can be  a  child’s  play  right  now. Swoosh!  Swoosh!  A  big  stroke  with  Cerulean  blue  and  another  one  with  Cadmium yellow.  The  outline  of  an  old  barn  or  a  grain  silo  in  the  distance  and  you  are  done.  The  Canola  fields  stretching  out  as  far  as  the  eyes  could  see  complimented  the  blue  sky.  This  quite  often  reminds  me  of  the  mustard  fields  in  India.  Travelling  by  car  or  train  in  the  countryside  during  the  winter  months,  the  eyes  see  a  sea  of  yellow.  The  two  are  so  similar  to  look  at,  yet  so  different  in  taste.  Canola  oil  is  bland  while  the  mustard  oil  is  perfectly  capable  of  watering  the  eyes  and  nose.

mawtor dal bhate-9

Mustard  oil  gives  the  zing  when  added  raw  to  any  food.  In  Bengali  cooking  we  often  take  advantage  of  that  and  make  a  bland  boiled  potato  or  lentil  into  a  delicacy  with  a  punch.

mawtor dal bhate-8

Growing  up  in  India  those  days,  handwashing  dishes  was  the  norm.  Rendezvous  with  Dish  washer  was  a  later  event.  Summer  holidays  would  mean  taking a  daylong  train  ride  to  my  grandparent’s  home.  Food  was  packed  for  the  journey  in  shiny  stainless  steel  tiffin  carriers.  Food  that  would  not  stale  for  the  length  of  the  journey.

mawtor dal bhate-10mawtor dal bhate-7

The   preparation  for  the  journey  used  to  be  as  exciting  as  the  journey  itself.  The  Dhobi  (  Washerman )  was    given  strict  instructions  as  to  when  the  clothings  were  to  be  delivered  by.  A  couple  of  days  allowance  was  always  factored  in,  knowing  all  too  well  that  Ganesh  our  Dhobi  would  always  break  his  promise .

mawtor dal bhate-12

Ma  used  to  cook  the  Mawtor  Dal  Bhate  often  on  the  day  of  the  travel.  It  cut down  dishwashing  on  the  day  of  the  travel  and  kept  one  satiated  for  a  good  length  of  time.  The  lentils  providing  adequate  protein.  The  added  spices   made  it  so  tasty  that  one  didn’t  miss  other  courses  for  lunch.

mawtor dal bhate-11

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Mawtor  Dal                                          Two  cups

Grated  coconut                                   Two  Tbsps

Salt                                                       To  taste

Mustard  oil                                           One  and  half  tsps.

Red  chillies                                          A  couple,  sliced  thinly

Cilantro                                                Chopped,  one  tsp

Method;

Soak  the  dal  overnight.  Grind  it  to  paste  with  minimum  water  next  day.  Cook  rice  in  a  pan.  Let  it  come  to  a  boil.  Make  round  balls,  roughly  the  size  of  golf  ball  with  the  ground  dal.  Slowly  drop  these  balls  one  at  a  time  in  the  same  pan,  waiting  a couple  minutes  in  between . Let  it  cook  with  the  rice.  It  takes  about  fifteen  minutes  for  the  balls  to  be  firm  and  done.  Fish  them  out  of  the  pan  and  place  in  a  separate  bowl.  Add  all  the  other  ingredients.  Mash  them  together.  I  used  a  masher  only  because  it  was  very  hot  to  touch.  Form  into  balls  again.  Enjoy  with  plain  rice.

Inside  Scoop;

All  measurements  can  be  adjusted  to  taste.

The  ground  dal  looked  a  bit  runny,  maybe  I  was  heavy  handed  with  water.  I  used  a  muslin  cloth  to  strain  the  extra  water  out.

I  used Basmati  rice  and  found  that  the  rice  was  a  bit  overdone  for  my  taste   by  the  time  the  dal  balls  were  firm.  Using  either  brown  or  Jasmine  rice  would  be  a  better  idea.

I  did  not  mention  how  many  it  serves.  The  sizes  of  the  dal  balls  are  arbitrary  and  can  easily  be  adjusted  to  need.

Strawberry Pecan Pie for Canada Day

By  Ratna

Strawberry pecan pie-9

‘Shokale  taratari  deke  dish’,  ‘Wake  me  up  early’,  Mum  reminded  me.  It  was  her  oath  taking  ceremony  next  morning.

As  she  tied  her  hair  and  changed her  sari,  I  couldn’t  help  but  notice  how  much  she  had  aged.  Walking  very  slowly  supporting  herself  on  the  walking  stick  she  asked  for  help  in  putting  the  maple  leaf  broach  that  she  had  carefully  stored  in  her  butterfly  shaped  jewellery  box.  As  we  waited  in  the  judge’s  chamber  I  noticed  she  sat  quietly  rubbing  the  thumb  and the  first  finger  of  her  right  hand,  something  she  did  whenever  she  was  nervous.

I  felt  I  could  see  what  was  going  through  her  mind  like  the  pictures  in  a  kaleidoscope.  Sharing  laughter  with  friends,  tending  to  her  garden,  instructing  the  household  helps  in  their  daily  chores  she  had  lived  all  her  life  in  India. So  many  memories,  so  many  emotions  were  crisscrossing  her  mind  just  like  the  creases  on  her  face.  Very  soon  she  will  not  call  India  her  home. A  new  country  where  she  does  not  have  any  friends,  a  country  where  snow  covers  the  ground  for  months  together  will  be  her  new  home.  An  arrangement  that  was  made  to  enable  her to  stay  close  to  her  children,  at  the  time  of  her  life  when  she  is  more  like  the  child  than  a  mother.

Strawberry pecan pie-4

We  had  gone  over  a  few  times  the  formalities  that  would  occur  in  the  judge’s  chamber.  No  exams  for  her,  just  pledging,  ‘O  Canada, our  home  and  native  land  ……we  stand  on  guard  for  thee….’.   Are  you  alright  ma?  I  asked  nudging  her.  She  said  nothing. ‘Aami  kintu  India  keo  onek  bhalobashi’,  there,  she  let  it  out.  ‘I  still  love  India  a  lot’.  Her  gnarly  fingers  gave  out  what  her  tongue  couldn’t  for  the  longest  time.

Strawberry pecan pie-6

I  then  realized  what  was  bothering  her.  Erasing  the  feelings  for  the  land  of  one’s  birth  was  not  a  prerequisite  to  becoming  a  good  citizen  I  reassured  her.

Strawberry pecan pie-2

Oh  she  said,  like  Lord  Krishna,   Devaki  was  his  mother  by  birth  and  Yashoda  was  the  mother  who  brought  him  up. That’s  right  Ma, I  chimed  in.  India  was  your  country  of  birth  and  Canada  will  now  be  your  new  Motherland  just  like  Yashoda.  Her  face  lit  up.  I  noticed  she  put  her  right  hand  on  the  left  side  of  her  chest  as  she  sang  ”  O  Canada”…

Strawberry pecan pie-13

I  haven’t  baked  a  lot  of  pies.  The  latest  “Taste  of  Home”  magazine  had  a  Stars  and  Stripes  Pie  recipe  that  inspired  me  to  try  a  Canadian  version  of  the  same.  I  retained  the  recipe   with  some  alterations.

Strawberry pecan pie-11

Strawberry pecan pie-14

I  have  to  admit  this  is  my  second  try.  It  tasted  pretty  good,  I  have  learnt  the “(Secret)  Life  of  Pie”  the  hard  way.

DSC_2320

Recipe:

Ingredients:

For  the  Pastry,

All  purpose  flour                                        Two  and  half  cups

Salt                                                                Half  tsp

Cold  unsalted  butter,  cubed                    One  cup

Ice  water                                                     Six  to  ten  Tbsp

Filling,

Fresh  Strawberries  roughly  chopped          Five  cups

Lemon  juice                                                   Two  tsp

Sugar  divided                                                One  cup  plus  one  tsp

All  purpose  flour                                           One  third  cup

Ground  cinnamon                                          One  and  one  fourth  tsp,  divided

Two  percent  milk                                           One  Tbsp

Mint  leaves  chopped                                      Half  tsp

Chopped  pecan  nuts                                     Half  cup

Method;

In  a  large  bowl,  mix  flour  and  salt;  cut  in  butter  until  crumbly.  Gradually  add  ice  water,  tossing  with  a  fork  until  dough  holds  together  when  pressed.  Divide  dough  in  two  pieces.  Shape  each  into  a  disk;  wrap  in  a  plastic  wrap.  Refrigerate  for  one  hour.

Preheat  oven  to  375  degrees.  For  filling,  place  strawberries  in  a  large  bowl;  drizzle  with  lemon  juice  and  mint  leaves.  In  a  small  bowl,  mix  one  cup  sugar,  flour  and  one  tsp  cinnamon. Sprinkle  over  strawberries  and  toss  gently  to  coat.  Add  the  nuts.

On  a  lightly  floured  surface,  roll  one  portion  of  dough  to  a  one  eighth  inch  thick  circle,  transfer  to  a  nine  inch  pie  plate.  Trim  pastry  even  with  rim.  Add  prepared  filling.

Roll  the  remaining  dough  to  a  one  eighth  thick  circle.  Place  top  pastry  over  filling.  Trim,  seal  and  flute  edge.  Use  a  maple  leaf  cookie  cutter  and  cut  out  the  shape  on  the  top  pastry.  From  the  left  over  dough  cut  out  two  rectangles  about  one  and  quarter  inch  to  one  eighth  inch  and  place  them  on  either  side  of  the  maple  leaf  cutout.  Press  to  stick.

Bake  forty  minutes.  Mix  remaining  sugar  and  cinnamon.  Brush  top  of  pie  with  milk;  sprinkle  with  cinnamon-sugar.  Bake  fifteen  to  twenty  minutes  longer  or  until  crust  is  golden  brown  and  filling  is  bubbly.  Cool  on  a  wire  rack.

Inside  Scoop;

Do  not  knead  at  all  when  mixing  the  dough  together.  The  first  one  I  did  turned  out  very  tough.