Lentil and Pea soup with ginger and fennel seeds

by  Ratna

Lentil  and  Pea  soup-2

On  the  finish  line,  Phew!  I  have  never  run  a  marathon.  The  Lentil  Recipe  Revelation    Challenge was  the  closest  I  got  to  one.  Ten  days,  Five  recipes.  Preparing  a  recipe,  testing  and  tasting  it,  pictures,  text,  edit….    Just  when  I   pictured  myself  stretching  my  stride  to  the  maximum  and  emptying  the  water  bottle  on  my  head  I  feel  a  light  pat  on  my  back.  It  wasn’t   Abebe  Bikila  ,  ”Aaj  ki  banale?”,  it  was  my  husband  N  enquiring  what  I  cooked  today.  I  came  back  to  reality.   There  were  no  audiences   in  the  sweltering  heat  cheering  me  on  either  side  of  the  road.  I  was  in  fact  in  the  comfort  of  my  own  kitchen.  The  snow  on  the  ground  outside,  assured  me  I  was  still  in  the  Prairies.  This  is  my  fifth  and  final  entry  for  ”Best  in  the  Freestyle  Category“.  This  experience  was  beyond  fun.  What  is  life  without  a  bit  of  adrenaline  rush?

Split  and  skinned  black  lentils  are  a  staple  with  rice.  I  developed  it  into  a  soup,  without  being  in  one.  I  added  green  peas  for  flavour  and  colour.  After  gazing  out  in the  white  wilderness  for  the  last  five  months,  my  eyes  refuse  anything  without  colour  now.  This  is  a  super  easy   recipe  that  can  be  enjoyed  with  either  Naan  or  any  crusty  bread.

Lentil  and  Pea  soup

Eta  Gawrom  kale  khetam  na?”,  We  enjoyed  it  in  summer  didn’t  we,  reminded  N.  This  lentil  helps  cool  the  body.  So  one  can  enjoy  it  as  a  Gazpacho  too  in  hot  days.  Spring  where  are  you?

Friends  you  can   read  about  my  entry  in  ”Best  in  Appetizer”  here.  Best  in  Main  course”,  here.  ”Best  in  Salad”  here.  The  luscious  Trifle  in  ”Best  dessert  or  baked  good”   here. Please  don’t  forget  to  leave  a  comment  below  this  post,  I  need  your  help.  Part  of  the  criteria  in  judging  is  of  course,  its  popularity  in  social  media.  Will  you  ”like”  this  and  all  the  previous  ones  in  the  Facebook  page  of  Canadian  lentils.ca  ?   Please.  Thank  you  so  much  for  your  time.

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Split  and  skinned  black  lentils                                One  cup

Green  peas                                                                 Half  cup

Asafoetida  or  Hing                                                     Small  pinch

Cumin  seeds                                                              One  tsp

Fennel  seeds                                                             One  tsp

Ginger                                                                        One  Tbsp  grated.

Dry  red  chilli                                                           Half,  optional

Ghee                                                                          One  Tbsp

Salt                                                                           To  taste

Method;

Wash  a  cup  of  lentil  and  boil  it  with  a  bit  of  salt  and  the  grated  ginger.  I  used  a  pressure  cooker.  Waited  for  one  whistle  and  let  the  pressure  release  itself  before  I  opened  the  lid.

Thaw  the  peas.  Put  the  boiled  lentils  and  the  peas  in  a  blender.  Keep  aside.

Dry  roast  the  cumin  and  fennel  seeds  together  with  the  dry  red  chilli  ( if  using  it  ).  As  soon  as  the  seeds  changes  colour  to  light  brown,  take  it  out ,  grind  and  keep  aside.

Pour  the  ghee  in  a  pan  on  high  heat.  Add  the  Hing  and  reduce  the  gas  to  medium  and  as  soon  as  you  get  a  nice  aroma,  close  the  gas.  Add  it  to   the  lentil  and  peas  mix.  Add  water  to  bring  it  to  the  consistency  of  your  liking..  We  like  it  a  bit  thick  here.   Garnish  with  the  ground  spices.  Enjoy.

Inside  Scoop,

The  green  peas  give  the  sweetness to  the  soup,  which  can be  balanced  with  the  chilli,  if  you  prefer.  We  like  it  with  a  squirt  of  lemon  too.

If  you  are  new  to  Ghee,  here  is  how  you  can  make  it  at  home.

 

Halwa and Fig Trifle

By  Ratna

Halwa  and  Fig  Trifle-2

“Michael  aajke  khoob  bhalo  rendheche”,   Michael  cooked  really  well  today,  is  the  first  thing  Ma  said  as  I  walked  in  through  the  door.  No,  this  is  not  any  Michael,  but  ”The  Michael  Smith”.  Chef  Michael  Smith.  ”Ghee  ke  boleche  Gee”,  she  would  brief  me  somedays.  Michael  said  Gee  for  Ghee,  totally  disregarding  the “h”.  My  close-to-eighty  mom  is  Michael’s  biggest  fan.

There  are  days  when  she  has  memory  lapses  and  calls  me  with  my  sister’s  name  or  the  other  way  round.  And  sometimes  recalls  in  great  detail  the  life   of  Henry  the  VIII,  recalling  high school  history  lectures.  ”Awshtom  Henry”  as  she  refers  to  him  in  Bengali.  Osteoporosis  has  claimed  a  couple  inches  of  her  four  feet  ten  inches  height. “Aami  hole  eta  banatam”,  she  would’ve  cooked  these  ,  she  would  comment  after  watching  the  Iron  Chef  episodes.  Not  necessarily  agreeing  with  all  the  five  items  that  the  contestants  offered.  That  is  her  spirit.  We  sometimes  discuss  food  and  cooking  with  Ma,  to  take  her  mind  off  of  the  pain  from  arthritis.   Food  talk  always  lifts  Ma’s  mood.  She  is   our  little  Iron  Chef.

Halwa  and  fig  trifle-6

As  I  learnt  about  the  Lentils  Recipe  Revelation  Challenge,  I  mentioned  it  to  her  in  passing.  The  how  and  when  of  the  regulations.  We  need  only  to  send  the  picture  of  the  food  to  the  judges  not  the  bowl  of  food.  She  said  nothing.   The  picture  of  the  luscious  Trifle  on  the  front  cover  of  the  recent  ”Canadian  Living ”  magazine  had  caught  my  eye  earlier  that  day.  I  was  toying  with  the  idea  of  incorporating  Mung  dal  Halwa ,  and  giving the  Trifle  an  Indian  twist.  Tucking  her  frail,  bent  body  into  the  Parka  before  her  doctor’s  visit,  I  cross  checked  a  few  details  of  the  Halwa  recipe. Eta  to  hawbe  na”,  but  that  won’t  do,   she  reminded  me,  I  had  to  come  up  with  an  innovative    way  of  using  lentil.  ”Yes  mother”,  I  said,  ”I  do  have  a  plan”.  She  listened  intently  while  I  explained  how  I  planned  to  paint  a  Halwa  colour  in  the  Trifle.  This  time  she  nodded  her  head  in  approval.

Halwa  and  fig  trifle-8

Mung  dal  Halwa  is  a popular  dessert  in  India,  particularly  during  the  winter  months.  It  helps  to  keep  the  body  warm. I  have  played  around  with  the  Trifle  recipe.  Used  Greek  yoghurt  and  honey  instead  of  the  custard. This  is  my  entry  for  ”Best  in  dessert or  baked  good”,  in  the  Lentil  Recipe  Revelation  Challenge.

You  can  surprise  your  kin  with  this  new  dessert  for  this  year’s  family  Easter  dinner.  Let  me  know  how  it  turns  out.  If  you  like  this  recipe  please  do  not  forget  to  leave  a  comment.  I  do  need  your  help.  Please..

My   entry  for  the  ”Best  in  the  appetizer”  category  here,  ”Best  in  Main  dish”  here  and  ”Best  in  salads”  here.

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Sufficient  for  six  tall  wine glass,

Pound  cake                           454  gms.  Store  bought.

Sun  dried  fig                          6  cut  in  thin  strips

Greek  yoghurt                         500  gms  tub.  Fat  free

Honey                                       Six  Tbsp

Pistachios                                  One  Tbsp

Orange  rind                              One  tsp

Pomegranate  seeds               One  Tbsp

Halwa;

Split  and  skinned  green  lentil                 One  cup

Ghee                                                           One  cup

Sugar                                                          One  cup

Method;

Halwa.

Soak  the  lentils  overnight.  Coarse  grind  it  with  very  little  water.  Strain  it  through  a  cheese  cloth  to  remove    the  excess  water.  Heat  ghee  in  a  pan  on  high  heat.  Add  the  lentil,  turn  the  gas  to  medium,  keep  stirring.  The  colour  will  slowly  change  to  a  light  brown  in about  twenty  five  minutes.  Add  two  cups  of  water  and  the  sugar.  Stir  carefully.  It  tends  to  splutter.  The  water  will  slowly  evaporate,  leaving  a  soft,  smooth,  delicious  Halwa.  Let  it  cool  to  room  temperature

To  assemble  the  Trifle,  slice and  pack  the  cake  in  the  bottom.  Next,  put  a  layer  of  Halwa . Spoon  the  Greek  yoghurt  on  the  Halwa  with  a  drizzle  of  honey.  Add  a  layer  of  thinly  sliced  figs.  Repeat  these  layers  to  fill  the  glass.  Top  it   up  with  a  few  pieces  of  pistachios,  orange  rind  and   pomegranate  seeds.

Grab  a  spoon,  put  your  feet  up  and  dig  in!

Inside  Scoop;

Stirring  the  Lentil  to  make  the  Halwa  takes  a  bit  a  time  .  The  result  is  totally  worth it.

You  can  read ,  how  to  make  Ghee  at  home  here.

Chutputa Lentil salad

By  Ratna.Chutputa  lentil  salad (1 of 1)

Indian  street  food  is  my  weakness.   Period.  I  miss  them  when  not  available,  go  way  overboard  with  the  portions  while  enjoying  them,  then  promise  myself  never  again,  only  to  break it  soon  enough.  The  vendors  trundle  their  wooden  carts  along  the  neighbourhood  lanes.  Some  park  theirs  in  a  fixed  spot   in  town.  The  carts  in  need  of  a  paint  or  two,  or  a  spellcheck  in  the  header  but  have  their  interiors  arranged  to  perfection.  The  green  chillies  stand  like  little  soldiers,  the  lime  in  one  corner and small  paper  bags  stacked  in  the  back.   Concoctions  of  spice  mixtures,  assorted  bottles  of  syrups,  fresh  herbs  all  within  arm’s  reach.  Ergonomics  at  its  best.

Aamra  chaat  khete  jabo ,  Boudi’,  We  are  going  out  for  Chaat,  Boudi,  said  D,  my  SIL.  I  was  visiting  India  last  year  about  this  time.  We  decided  on  Raj  Kachori.   The  quarter  plate  sized  deep  fried  bread  came  with   a  filling.  The  dressings  overflowing  on  to  the  plate.  I  took  a  couple  minutes  to  feast  with  my  eyes  first.  The  sharp  smell  of  the  black  salt  hit  my  senses.  ”Darun  khete  na?”  Tastes  great,  doesn’t  it ?  enquired  D.  Between  tackling  the  mouthfuls  and  wiping  my  running  nose  I  nod  my  head  in  agreement.  A  perfectly  titrated  combination  of  sweet,  sour  and  heat.

Then  came  the  Recipe  Revelations  Challenge.  Why  don’t  I,  I  said  to  myself,  create  a  healthier  version  of  the  food  from  that  evening.  I  eliminated  the  fried  bread  altogether.  Included  spinach  and  developed  a  new  salad.  This  is  my  entry  for  the  ”  Best  in  salad”  category.

You  can  read  my  entry  in  ”Best  in  the  appetizer”  category  here.  ”Best  in  main  dish ”  here.

Friends,  once  I  started  to  taste  the  salad  it  was  hard  to  stop. Do  you  feel  the same  way  looking  at  the  picture?  I  need  your  help,  please  leave  a  comment  below  and  like  this  post  here.

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Spinach                                                                    Handful.

Boiled  and  cubed  potato                                      Four  medium

Chickpeas  soaked  and  boiled                               One  cup

Whole  green  lentil  sprouted                                   One  cup

Pomegranate  seeds                                                One  Tbsp

Sev   noodles                                                            One  Tbsp

Yoghurt  dressing.

Greek  Yoghurt                                                         One  cup

Salt                                                                            To  taste

Sugar                                                                        To  taste

Roasted  and  ground  cumin  seeds                       One  tsp

Chaat  masala                                                          One  tsp

Tamarind  dressing.

Tamarind  pulp                                                    Half  cup

Pitted  dates                                                        6  or  7,  chopped

Jaggery                                                               Half  cup  in  small  pieces

Cumin  seeds                                                     One  tsp

Fennel  seeds                                                     Small  pinch

Black  salt                                                         To  taste

Chilli  powder                                                    one  tsp  or  to  taste

Dried  ginger  powder                                      Half  tsp

Method;

Wash  the  spinach  leaves  and  chop  them into  bite  sized  pieces.

For  the  yoghurt  dressing,  whisk  the  yoghurt  and  add  the  rest  of  the  ingredients.

The  tamarind  dressing  can  be  made  this way.  Dry  roast  the  cumin  and  fennel  seeds  and  grind  them.  Set  aside.  In  a  pan  combine  the  tamarind  pulp,  dates,  jaggery  and  a  cup  of  water  to  boil.  About  five  to  seven  minutes  until  things  come  together.  Add  all  the  other  spices,  strain  them  to  get  a  smooth  chutney.

Take  the  serving  platter.  Arrange  the  spinach  pieces  all  around  as  the  base  layer. Add  the  potatoes  next.  Build  up  the  layers  using  the  chickpeas,  pomegranate  seeds,  sprouted  lentils,  Sev  noodles.  Drizzle  the  dressings  just  before  serving.

Keep  the  kleenex  box  handy.

Inside  Scoop;

The  Tamarind  dressing  can  be  made  ahead  and  stored  in  a  fridge.  Store  bought  can  be  an  option  for  lazy  days.

Sev  noodles  are  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores  or  in  the  world  food  section  of  Superstore.  They  are  made  out  of  Gram  flour.  Look  for  Nylon  Sev,  they  are  the  thinner  ones.

Black  salt  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

SIL                        Sister  in  law.

Boudi                  Term  used  to  address   elder  brother’s  wife.

Stuffed baby eggplants in yoghurt sauce

 

By  Ratnastuffed  eggplant-720

“Staaaart  the  car”,  I  felt  like  calling  out,  as  the  lady  did  in  the  IKEA  ad.  The  prices  of  lentils  had  been  slashed  for  Vaishakhi  festival  in  the  grocery  store.  Limit  four  per  customer  it  cautioned  in  fine  print.  This  is  at  a  time  when  I’m   participating  in  the  Lentil  Recipe  Revelation  Challenge“.  The  countertop  in  my  kitchen  is  starting  to  look  like  the  Biology  lab.  Red,  green,  black  lentils,  some  soaked  in  containers,  others  wrapped  in  cheesecloth,  some  sprouting,  others  doubling  in  size.  The  racks  in  the  fridge  displaying  leftover  lentil  paste  individually  ziplocked  and  labelled.

This  is  my  entry  for  ”  Best  in  main  course”   category  for  the  Lentil  Revelation  Challenge.  Stuffing  vegetables  is  quite  common.   The  possibilities  for  the  stuffing  are  endless.  It  could  either  be  with  vegetables,  or  lentils,   nuts,    meat  or   even  a  combination  of  any  of  these..  The  stuffed  vegetable  can  either  be  enjoyed  just  fried  or  in  a  bed  of  sauce.  We  like  it  with  rice  in  this  household.  It  can  very  well  be  paired  with  Naan  or  rotis.

The  uniqueness  of  the  recipe  has  been  simplifying   it   with  fewer  ingredients  and  substituting  Lentil  powder  instead  of  gram  flour.   Adding  the  stuffed  eggplants  in  the  yoghurt  sauce  in  the end  works  better  in  my  hands.  This  eliminates  the  risk  of  the  yoghurt  splitting  when heated.

You  can  read  my  entry  in  ”Best  in  appetizer”  category  here.

I  need  your  help  friends.  Do  you  like  the  idea  of  this  recipe?  Does  the  picture  make  you  want  to  go  shopping  for  baby  eggplants?  Please  leave  a  comment  below.  I  would  like  to  know  your  thoughts. Thanks  for  visiting.

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Baby  eggplants                                                                                                About  8

For  the  stuffing,

Split  and skinned  green  lentil  powder                                                            Half  cup

Peanuts, coarsely  ground                                                                                  Half  cup

Cumin  seeds  whole                                                                                            Half  tsp

Asafoetida  or  Hing                                                                                              One  pinch

Salt                                                                                                                        To  taste

Canola  oil                                                                                                              For  deep frying

Turmeric  powder                                                                                                 Half  tsp

For  the  gravy,

Greek  yoghurt                                                                                                      Two  cups

Sugar                                                                                                                    To  taste

Chilli  powder                                                                                                        To  taste

Roasted  and  ground  cumin  into  powder                                 half  tsp

Salt                                                                                                  To  taste

Cilantro                                                                                           One  tsp  finely  chopped

Method;

Wash    eggplants  with  water.  Make  two  slits  in  it  all  the  way  except  near  the  stalk.  This  will  leave  them  in  one  piece  while  creating  room  for  stuffing.  Sprinkle  salt  and  turmeric  powder.  Let  it  sit  for  about  five  minutes.  Take  oil  in  a  wok  and  deep  fry  them.  Place  them  on  paper  towels.

Stuffing:     Place  a  Tbsp  of  oil  in  a  pan  on  high  heat.  Throw  in  the  cumin  seeds,  as  soon  as  it  is  lightly  coloured,  add the  hing.  Wait  for the  aroma,  this is  the  cue  to  add  the  lentil  paste  and  chopped  peanuts.  Bring  the  flame  down  to  medium  and   saute  for  a  few  minutes.  Add  salt  to  taste.  As  is  gets  dry,  add  some  water.  Cover  and  cook  for a  few  minutes.  It  should  be  the  consistency  of  a  thick  paste.  Turn off  the gas.

Carefully  pack  the  stuffing  in  the  eggplants  with  a  small  spoon.  I’d  be  careful so  that  the  stalk  remains  intact.  When  done,  keep  it  aside.  Save  the  left  over  stuffing.

Clean  the  pan  where  the  the  stuffing  was  prepared  and  place  it  on  medium  heat.  Add  a  cup  of  water   with  any  leftover  stuffing.   Carefully  seat  the  eggplants  one  by  one  into  the  pan.  Cover,   simmer  for  a  few  minute.  Close  gas.

Whisk  the  yoghurt  with  half  cup  water. Add  salt,  sugar  and  chilli  powder.  Balance  to  your taste.   Skip  the  chilli  powder  for a  mild  taste.  Add  the  roasted  and  ground  cumin  seed  powder.  Carefully  add  the  stuffed  eggplants  and  the  gravy.  Garnish  with  cilantro.  The  thickness  of  the  yoghurt  sauce  can  be  adjusted  by  adding  water,  to  your  liking.

Inside  Scoop;

I  bought  Moong  dal  (  split  and  skinned  green  lentil  )  flour, from  the  local  Indian  grocery  store.  If  that  is  not  available,  soak  the  lentils  the  night  before ,  grind  with  little  water.

When  enjoyed  with  rice  or  Naan   it  can  be  a full  meal.  The  lentils  are  a  good  source  of  protein .

I  cooked  this  last  evening  after  getting  back  from  work.  We  enjoyed  it  for  supper.  With  a  bit  of  planning  it  can  work  as  a   weeknight  supper.

Peanuts   can  be   substituted   with  grated  coconut.

 

 

 

Lentil and onion Pakora

By Ratnalentil  and  onion  pakora-708-2

It  snowed  again.  The  big  flakes  came  down  fast,  as  if  a   paper  shredder  had  been  emptied.   We  were  spoilt  with  a  bit  of  good  weather  for  the  last  few  days  and  got  carried  away.   We  opened  the  windows  and  let  the  fresh  air  in  after  four  months.  Severed  relationship  altogether  with  the  heavy  parka.  Felt  the  steering  wheel  with  bare  hands.  Why  even  the  Calendar  announced  the  first  day  of  spring!  Oh  well,  we  know  better  than  that  in  the  prairies.  April  will  bring  more  snow.  May  hasn’t  been  out  of  bounds  for  snow  either  for  some  years. To  go  with  this  cold  weather  I  made  these  crispy  onion  Pakoras.

spring-701

I  read  with  interest  about  the  ”  Lentil  Recipe  Revelation  Challenge“.  My  blogger  friend  from  ” Keep  calm  and  eat  on   invited  us  to  join  it.  Coming  from  a  similar  background  in  India,  where   lentils  are  part  of   our  diet   24/7/365,  I  couldn’t  let  this  go  by  me  unchallenged.  In  fact  not  too  long  back  I  wrote  about  a  lentil  soup  here  . This  is  my  entry  for  ”  Best  in  the  appetizer ”  category.  It  was  lot  of  fun.  There  still  is  time  in  case  you  want  to  be  part  of  this  project.

Pakoras  are  usually  made  from  Besan  or  gram  flour.  Sometimes  rice  flour  is  added.  I  have  substituted  red  lentil  paste  in  place  of  the  rice  flour  to  give  the   pakoras  more  colour  and  crispiness.  Just  what  you  want  with  this  weather!

People  often  shy  away  from  Indian  Cooking  because  the  ingredients  list  runs  for  a  page  and  a  half.  I  am  on  a  mission  here.  For  this  challenge  I  have  made  a  point  to  use  the   minimum  number  of  ingredients.  Try  this  recipe  and  you  will  be  surprised  with  the  results.  I  have  put  the  difficulty  rating  for  this  recipe  as  ”child’s  play”.  The  other  two  being  ”knew  I  could  do  that” and  ”evil’.

If  you  are  lucky  enough  to  be  enjoying  a  beautiful  warm  spring  day,  even  better.  Maybe  you  have  planned  an  afternoon  with  family  and  friends  barbecuing.  The  freshly  cut  green  grass  tickling  your  bare  feet,  children  on  the  trampoline  and  Fido  catching  his  breath  with  his  tongue  hanging  out.  The  noise  of  the  neighbour’s  lawnmower  in  the  background.  You  bring  out  a  batch  of  these  freshly  fried  pakoras.  Friends  do  you  feel  your  fingers  are  ready  to  grab  one,  like  the  ones  we  see  in  the  picture?

Have  I  been  able  to  entice  you  with  the  story?  In  the  virtual  world  of  ”Challenges”,  for  these  pakoras  to  see  the  light  of  the  day,  I  need  your  help. Please  leave  a  comment  below,  telling  me  your  thoughts.  If  you’ve  tried  them already,  were  they  yummy?

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Onion                               One  medium,  finely  chopped

Gram Flour  (  Besan  )    One  cup

Red  Lentils                      Half  cup

Cilantro                             Roughly  chopped , Half  cup

Baking  Soda                   Half  tsp

Salt                                   One  and  half  tsp,  and  another  tsp  to  sprinkle.

Chilli  powder                    One  quarter  tsp  (  optional  )

Asafoetida   (  hing  )           Small  pinch  (  optional )

Canola  oil                           For  deep  frying

Method;

Wash  and  soak  the  red  lentils  for  couple  of  hours.  Grind  it  in  a  paste  with  very  little  water.

In  a  bowl  mix  the  Gram  flour  and  baking  soda.  Add  all  the  other  ingredients,  next.  The  mixture  should  be  thick,  but  pliable.  I  did  not  have  to  add  extra  water.  The  water  that  I  added  to  grind  the  lentils  was  sufficient.  If  you  feel  add  very  little  water.

Heat  canola  oil  in  a  wok  on  high  heat. I  took  a  big  wok  and  filled  it  with  oil,  two  inches  deep.  Put  a   little  bit  of  the  batter  to  check  if  the  oil  is  ready.  The  batter  should  rise  up  to  the  surface  right away.  Turn  the  gas  to  medium  now.  With  your  finger  take  about  ”loonie”  size  batter  and  carefully  dip  in  the  oil.  Do  not  overcrowd,  about  six  or  seven  in  a  batch  will  do.  The  batter  need  not  be  formed  into  a  round  ball.  The  little  unevenness  actually  makes  the  onion  pakora  more  appealing.  Turn  the  gas  lower  now,  between  medium  and  low.  The  pakora  has  to  cook  even.  If  the  gas  is  on  high,  it   will  only  cook  on  the  outside,  the  inside  remaining  uncooked.  When  the  colour  changes  to  golden  brown,  remove  them  on  paper  towels.  Sprinkle  a  little  more  salt on  them  now.

Serve   them  with  Tomato  ketchup  and/or  mustard  sauce.  This  is  what  my  family  prefers.  Any  sauce  can  be  used.

In  a  snowy  day  I’d  serve  them  with  a  hot  cup  of  tea.  This  is  such  a  versatile  dish,  you  can  enjoy  it  as  much  on  a  hot  summer  day  too.  I’d  probably  then  change  the  drink  to  a  cold  one….

Inside  Scoop;

Gram  flour  or  Besan  is  available  in  the  World  food  section  in  Superstore.

Asafoetida  or  Hing  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  store.

 

Phool kofi Aloor Dalna

Cauliflower  with  peas  and  potatoes

By  Ratna

Phool kofi-689

The  clocks  have  moved  forward.  Sprung  forward.  Adjusting  the  clock  could  be  a  bit  confusing  sometimes.  The  way  I  remember  is  we  go  to  work  an  hour  early.  The  thought  of  going  to  work  early  may  not  be  something  to  look  forward  to,  for  anybody,  me  included.  There  still  is  an  excitement  with  the  words  ”sprung  forward”.  This  also  means  somewhere  I  see  the  words  ”Spring”.  Ah  yes,  Spring.

The  picture  of  Tulip  heads  swaying  with  the  wind  and  chirping  of  the  birds  immediately  come  to  mind.  Alas,  I  do  not  see  any  of  those  yet.   Ravens  and   Magpies  are  the  resident  bird  species   around.   They  don’t  seem  to  mind  the  weather.  Their  nests  now  exposed  in  between  the  branches  of  the  leafless  trees,  looking  like a  game  of  tic  tac  toe.    The  sun  tries  hard  to  melt  the  snow.  It  barely  makes  a  dent  some days  even  with  the  help  of  its  accomplice  the  wind. The  lakes   were  frozen  solid  untill  a  week  back.   The  neighbourhood  kids  took  advantage  of  this  by  playing  a  game  of  hockey  on  it.

Growing  up  Cauliflower  was  a  vegetable  of  winter.  Cauliflower  of  all  sizes  used  to  flood  the  markets.  With  school  being  closed  for  the  christmas  holidays,  we  would  sleep  in.  Breakfast  would  be  a  lazy  affair.  Friends  would  stop  by  late  morning.  We  played  badminton.  The  proper  court  was  a  few  blocks  away.  We  played  impromptu  games  on  makeshift  courts.  The  branches  of  the  mango  tree  of  Anita  Kakima”s  house  to  the  poinsettia  bush  in  our  house  used  to  be  the   net  line.  Marked  on  the  ground  for  better  reference  using  a  few  irregular  twigs  from  the  garden.  Ma  and  Baba  tended  to  our  garden,  as  if  that  was  another  of  our  sibling.  Rose,  Chrysanthemum,  Dahlia  in  round,  rectangular  beds  would  reward  their  efforts  manifold.  We  would  straddle  our  feet  very  carefully   between  the  two  flower  beds . The  effort  paid  most  of  the  times.  The  shuttle  cock  would  put  us  in  big  trouble  sometimes,  landing  on  the   pink  Damask  rose,  that  was  so  perfect  until  then.

Phool  kofi-602

The  smell  of   cauliflower  being  cooked  would  waft  from  our  kitchen  window. That  would  be  our  cue  to  wind  up  the game  soon.  Ma  would  be  asking  us  to  get  ready  for  lunch.

Phool kofi-688

There  would  be  days  when  she  would  ask  us  for  help.  Cutting  some  vegetables  or  shelling  the  peas. “Dekho,  hath  keto   na”,  she  would  caution,  careful,  don’t  cut  your  hand.  In  between  stirring  the  Dalna,  she  would  run  her  eyes  on  the  Thonga,  the  carrier  bags.  The  ’Thongas’  were  made  from  old  newspapers,  unlike  the  brown  paper  bags  we  have here.  There  were  two  windows  in  the  kitchen.  The  one  faced  east  led  the  eyes  towards  our  garden,  her  children  playing.  ”Let  me  take  a  look  at  your  knee”,   she  would  demand  rightfully  some days,  ”Pore  gele  dekhlam”.  ”Saw  you  slip”.  The  north  facing  window  gave  a  view  of  the  road  leading  to  the  neighbourhood  properties.  Why  was  the  ambulance  waiting  in  front  of  Meeradi’s  house,  she  worried.  Ma  had  the  pulse  for  our  house  and  of  the  neighbourhood,  sitting  on  her  low  stool  in  the  kitchen.  A  pilot  in  the  cockpit, all  the  while   humming  a  few  lines  from  her  favourite  Rabindra  Sangeet.  Talk  about  multitasking.

Phool kofi-691-2

We  have  made  progress.  One  doesn’t  have  to  wait  for  winter  to  have  cauliflower  or  peas.  Mangoes  can  be  enjoyed   year  round.  Snow  could  be  on  grounds  in  the  Prairies,   it  is  still  summer  in  Peru  or  Mexico.  Novel  methods  of  storing  and  transporting   almost  anything  to  anywhere ,  anytime  has  been  made  possible.  Nature  has  been  put  on  the  backseat.  Apparently  we  want  things  here, now.

Friends,  do  you  have any  fond  memories  of  food  with  a  particular  season?  What  are  your  thoughts  on  eating  seasonal?

Recipe:

Ingredients:

Cauliflower                    Half  head  of  a  big  cauliflower,  cut  into  medium  florets.

Potatoes                       Two  medium,  cut  into  small  cubes.  I  keep  them  skin  on.

Green  peas                  Half  cup  shelled.  I  used  frozen.

Tomatoes                     Four  medium  chopped  into  small  cubes

Cilantro                        Chopped,  two  tsp

Bay  leaf                      Couple

Ginger                           One  inch  grated

Cumin  seeds                One  and  half  tsp

Turmeric  powder         One  half  tsp

Chilli  powder                 One  quarter  tsp

Coriander  powder        Two  tsp

Cumin  powder             One  tsp

Salt                                To  taste

Canola  oil                      Four  tbsp

Ghee                               One  tsp

Garam  masala               One  tsp

Method:

Put  the  canola  oil  in  a  wok  on  high  heat.  Add  cumin  seeds  and  bay  leaf  when  the  oil  is hot.  As  soon  as  the  cumin  seeds  get  a  bit  of  colour  and  a  nice  smell  comes  out,  throw  in  the  potatoes.  Sprinkle  salt  and  turmeric.  Saute  till  the  corners of  the  potatoes  turn  golden.  Cover  a  bit.  Add  the  cauliflower  florets  now. Give  it  a  nice  stir.  Lower  the  gas  to  medium.  In  a  small  bowl  add  cumin,  coriander,  chilli  powder  and  the  chopped  tomatoes.  Make  a thick  paste  by  adding  water.  Add  this  paste  to  the  wok.  Stir  intermittently  until  the  oil  separates  from  the  spices.  Careful  it  doesn’t  get  burned.  Now  add  three  cups  of  water  and  the  grated  ginger.  Cover  and  let  it  cook  till  done.  The  gravy  should  be  thick,  adjust  water  accordingly.  Put  the  gas  off,  add  the  peas,  ghee  and  garam  masala.  Garnish  with  chopped  cilantro.  Keep  covered  until  serving.

Check  the  taste.  Enjoy  with  rice . You  can  also  make  it  into  a  wrap,  using  tortillas  or  rotis   with  a  little  bit  yoghurt  by  the  side.

Inside  scoop:

Ma  Baba               Mum  and  Dad.

Taste  the  Dalna,  adjust  to  your  taste.  My  husband  N,  likes  things  a  bit  sweet,  so  I  squirt  a  bit  of  Tomato  Ketchup  towards  the  end.

Dalna  is  a preparation where  the  gravy  is  thicker.

Meeradi                      Di  or  Didi  is  respectfully suffixed name,  when  the  person  is  older

Kakima                      Dad’s  brother’s  wife.  Loosely  used  for  aunty.

Garam  masala         Available  in  stores.  ”How  to”  in  another  post.

Special  occasions  demand  less  healthy  options.  The  cauliflower  and  potatoes  for  those  occasions  are  fried  separately,  then  the  above  recipe  followed.  For  everyday  cooking  I  try  to  limit  the  oil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mushurir dal

Red  lentil  soup

By  Ratnatutorial session-376-3

Food  takes  centre  stage  anytime  I  talk  to  my  children. ‘This  has  been  a  very  busy  semester  Ma’,  they  tell  me.  I  know  what  it  means  in  terms  of  food.  Pot  noodles  and  coffee,  for  lunch,  supper,  snacks,  Thursday  or  Monday. ‘What  did  you  want  me  to  cook, when  you  are  here?’ I  would  ask  next.  Mentally  I  start  making  notes,  consult  the  cook  books  that  I  have.  Maybe  I  should  look  into   the  Biriyani  recipe  that  I  haven’t  tried  for  sometime,  or  I  should  step  away  from  the  Indian  food  and  venture  out  on  Pad  Thai  or  even  try  my  hands  on  baking  some  macaroons…..

I  clearly  remember  those  days  myself.  The  paper  notes  strewn  all  over  the  table, overflowing  onto  the  floor. The  new  geometric  design  on  the  wall,  made  entirely  from  different  colour  Post- its.  The  coffee  mug  balanced  precariously  on the  corner  of  the table  on  top  of  the  thick  note  book.  Many outside requests  of  help  to  ”clean”  the room  was  strongly  turned  down.  To  dig out  the  green  highlighter  from  under  a  few  layers  of  papers  used  to  be  a  delicate  act  of  balancing.  What  appeared  as  the  height  of  anarchy  was  actually  my   way  of  arranging  things.  There  was  a   method  to  my  madness.

Analog has given way to digital.  No  Post-its  or  highlighters  these  days,  just  the  sleek  silhouette  of  the   MacBook  Air  on  the  table.  The  cravings  for  Dal-Bhat  has  not  changed  though.

“…Khali  Dal  Bhat  khete  chai  Ma.”  “I’d  only  like  to  have  Dalbhat  Ma.”  This  is  the  answer  I  get  everytime.  Just  Dal  and  Rice.  Nothing  fancy,  just  simple,  is  all  they  ask  for.

singlehanded-452-4

Lentils  are  a  staple  food  in  India.  Dal  Bhat  or  Lentil  Rice  is  common  in  parts  of  the  country  that  grows  rice.  Dal roti  or  Lentil  and  bread  for  the  wheat  growing  areas.  The  recipe  changes,  every  thirty  Kilometers,  they  say.  Almost  every  family  has  a  way  to  cook  them.  The  changes  may  be  very  subtle,  just  a  few  extra  spices  in  the  tadka  or  even  omission  of  a  few,  could  give  the  final  product  a  new  ”look” or  taste  in  this  case.

Dal  was  never  thought  as  soup.  Lentil  soup  or  dal  soup  was  something  I  heard  only  after  moving  away  from  India.  Now  when  I  think  about  it,  it  can  very  well  be  a  soup.  Specially  in  the  prairie  winters,  I  can  never  say  no  to  a  bowl  of  piping  hot  goodness.  Any  thick  crusty  bread,  and  a  side  of  salad,  supper  is  served!

My children  like  the  lentil  and  rice  with  a  side  of  something  crunchy.  A  few  thick  cuts  of  shallot  or  a  couple  crispy  fried  poppadums  and  they  are  happy  campers.

tutorial session-372

Recipe;

Ingredients,

Mushur  Dal (  Split  red  lentils  )                  One  cup

Ghee                                                           One tbsp

Panch Phoron                                              One  quarter  tsp

Tomato                                                      One  large,  cut  in  small  cubes.

Ginger                                                       Half  inch  long,  finely  grated.

Green  chillies                                            A  couple  slit  length  wise.

Cilantro                                                      Chopped.  Two  tsps.

Salt                                                             To  taste.

Tomato ketchup                                          A  couple  squirts,  optional.

Method,

Boil  the  dal  with  water   and  turmeric  powder  in  a  saucepan.  I  usually  use  a  pressure  cooker.  Wait  for  only  one  whistle  and  let  it  cool  by  itself.  When  cooked  the  dal  changes  colour  to  yellow  and  becomes  mushy.  Keep  it  aside.

In  a  pan put  the  ghee, on  high  heat.  When  melted  add the  panch  phoron,  green  chillies  and  saute.  Just  when  the  mustard  seeds  from  the  panch  phoron  pop,  add  the  tomatoes.  Cook  till  they  are  mushy,  add this  mixture  to  the  dal.  Throw  in  the  grated  ginger,  salt  to  taste,  bring  it  to  boil  one  more  time  so  that  everything  mixes  well.

Garnish  with  the  chopped  cilantro  and  a  squirt  of  tomato  ketchup  if  you  want. Serve  either  with  rice  or  Naan  or  Roti.

tutorial session-379-3

Inside  Scoop:

Panch  phoron  is  a  combination  of  equal  parts  of  cumin  seeds,  nigella  seeds,  mustard  seeds,  fenugreek  seeds  and  fennel seeds. It  is  available  in  Indian grocery  stores  and  also  through  amazon.com

Tadka  is  a process  of  adding  some  herbs  to  a  bit  of  hot  oill,  then  adding  this  to  the  cooked  dish  for  extra  flavour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roasted Phool Makhana

singlehanded-555

Growing  up,  we  have  heard the  expression  ”Dev  Anand  Jewel  thief  hai”  many  times.  What  could  be  the  big  deal,  I  often  wondered.  Dev  Anand  (  60s  Bollywood  star )  is  the  Jewel  thief,  goes  the  simple  translation.  It  was only  in  my  teenage  years,  that  my  Mejo  Kakima  trusted  me  with  the  family  secret.

Almost  every  summer  my  Jethamoshai  paid  us  a  visit.  Always  in  a  spotless white  shirt  and  Dhoti, he  frequently  used  his  very  stained  handkerchief  to  wipe  his  nose.  Inspite  of  cleaning  the  nose,  there  always  used  to  be  some  snuff  that  lingered  on  top  of  his  upper  lip,  giving  the  impression  that  he  sported  a  funny  moustache.  I  clearly  remember  the  summer, when  I  was  included  in  the  ”elite”  group  in  the  family.  Mejo  Kakima  caught  my  attention,  then  moved  her  eyes  towards  Jethamoshai.  Without  saying  a  word  the  message  was  sent  out  ,  that  the  above  story  was  about  this  man.  I  was  so  proud  of  myself  then,  that  I  was  able  to  interpret  this .

  That   Jethamoshai  was  thrifty  was  common  knowledge.   Popcorn  was  unheard  of   in  movie  theatres  then.  Peanuts  roasted  and  dressed  with  lipsmacking  spices  used  to  be  sold  in  paper  cones.  Costing  not  more  than  a  few  cents,  people  didn’t  think  twice  about  treating  themselves  with  these  snacks.    Moong  Phali,  Moong  Phali   is  all  you  heard  during  intermission. The  story  goes  that  Jethamosai  went  to  theatres  to  watch  the  movie  ”Jewel  Thief”  once. The  hawker  tried  his  best  to  persuade  my  Jethamoshai  to  buy  some  peanut  snacks..  It  didn’t  work.  Jethamoshai  did  not  budge.  The  hawker  then  decided  to  punish  him.  It  was  a  thriller  movie,  the  story  had  just  climaxed, everybody  was  eager  to  know  the  end  of  the  story. After  all  who  could  the  Jewel  thief  be  ?  Just  when   you  couldn’t  leave  your  seat,  and  wished  they  wouldn’t  even  stop  for  intermission.     Then,  at  that  moment  the  hawker  in  a  hushed  voice  spitted  those  few  words  ”Dev  Anand  Jewel  thief  hai”,  in  my  Jethamoshai’s  ears  and  walked  off.  The  smooth  talking,  lead  actor  with  a  boyish  face,  was  in  fact  the  thief.  There….

singlehanded-549

Phool  Makhana  is  not  popcorn,  neither  is  it  sold  in  cinemas.  It  is in  fact  Lotus  seed  that  when  roasted,  puffs  up  just  like  the  popcorns  do.  It  is  also  known  as  Foxnut  or  Euryale  Ferox.   With  a  few  sprinkle  of  your  favourite  spices,  you  can  have  the  same  crunch  with  quite  a  few  health  benefits .  An  excellent  source  of  protein  and  calcium,  it  is  also  known  to  restore  the  body’s  vigour  and  delays  aging.

If  you  are  watching  the  Dufour-Lapointe   sisters  in  the  women’s  Moguls  skiing  event  in  Sochi  Olympics, or  Deepika  Padukone  in  the  Filmfare  awards,   keep  a  few  papercones  filled  with  Phool  makhana,  within  arm’s  reach.  You  might  even  be  looking  for  more.

Extra  butter  anybody?

singlehanded-565-3

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Phool  makana               One  packet  50  gms

Sea  salt                        To  taste

Turmeric  powder          One  fourth  tsp

Chilli  powder               One  fourth  tsp  (  Use  your  discretion  )

Cilantro                        One  tsp  finely  chopped.

Ghee                           One  tbsp

Chaat  masala             One  fourth  tsp

Lemon  juice                Half  tsp  (  optional  )

Method;

  Take  ghee  on  a  frying  pan,  on  medium  heat.  When  the  ghee  melts  add  the  Phool  makhana,  saute  on  low  to  medium  heat  for  about  eight  to  ten  minutes. Throw  in  the  turmeric  and  chilli  powder,  sea  salt.  Put  the  gas  off.  Try  a  couple  when  its  not  too  hot.  It  should  be  crunchy  all  through  and  not  hard  inside. If  it  still  feels  hard  inside  saute  for  a  couple  minutes  more.  Add  the  cilantro,  chaat  masala   and  a  squeeze  of  lemon  juice,  if  you  prefer.

Make  papercones  and  stuff  these  inside.

Inside  Scoop:

Jethamoshai          Dad’s  elder  brother.

Mejo  Kakima         Dad’s  second  brother’s  wife.

Phool  makhana  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

 

 

Matarshutir kochuri

Fried bread with pea filling

By Ratna

tutorial session-084-2

There  is  the  black  dress  and  there  is  the  PJ.   It  is  customary  to  have  two  names  in  India.  The  one   from  the  birth  certificate,   is  the  official  name.  There  is  one  more  name,  which  is  used  only  at  home,  by  close  friends  and  family,  kind  of  the  ”PJ”  of  names,  if  you  will.    One  cannot  address  elders  by  either  of  the  two  names  though!   A  generic  uncle  leaves  so  many  questions  unanswered.  So  kaku  is  dad’s  brother,  mamu  is  mum’s  brother.  Bawro,  Mejo,  Shejo   if  it  is  eldest,  second  or  third.  If  that  option  runs  out,  we  can  use  some  special  attribute  of  the  person,  Bhalo  mamu;  good  uncle.  It  can  be  his  work  like,  Daktar  kaku;  physician  uncle.  It  can  even  be  the  place  where  he  or  she  lives.  Londoner  Pishi,  Kolkatar  Dida.  Dad’s  sister  who  is  from  London  or  granma  who  lives  in  Kolkata.

tutorial session-052-3

I  had  a  Kolkatar  Dida.  My  Kolkatar  Dida.  She  was  my  Dida  and  not.  She  wasn’t  my  mum’s  mother.  She  was  her  Mamima,  her  mum’s  brother’s  wife  to  be  exact. ’ Dekho,  bhitore   jeno   hawa   na  thake’,  make  sure  there  is  no  air  left  inside.  She  used  to  remind  me,  while  stuffing  the  Kochuri.  Her  deft  fingers  moving  swiftly,  measuring  the  exact  amount  of  filling   everytime   and  stuffing  them,  all  the  while,  her  gaze  fixed  on  my  novice  hand. The  winter  in  Kolkata  would  see  fresh  peas  in  the  grocery  stores.  There  were  many  fond  memories  made,  helping  Dida  make  Kochuris.

tutorial session-087-2

Proud  to  be  the  first  Bengali  women  trained  Librarian,  she  treated  the  spice  cabinet  of  her  kitchen  or  the  credenza  in  the  dining  room  the  same  as  the  books  in  her  library  at  work.  The  turmeric  jar  could  always  be  found  on  the  third  rack,  second  place  from  left.  You  could  pick  the  tea  cozy  from  the  top  right  drawer  of  the  credenza  blindfolded.

She  seemed  to  have  solutions  to  everything.  Moving  to  the  big  Metropolis  of  Kolkata  from  a  little  town  with  only  a  single  traffic  light,  I  was  always  scared  that  I  couldn’t  find  my  way  around.  ”Keep  your  eyes  on  the  store  signboards  along  the  way,  they  have  the  adresses  clearly  written”,  she  said. Trivial  as  it  may  sound  today,  it  used  to  be  a  challenge  back  then.   The  daily  commute  to  University  from  Dida’s  house  used  to  take  a  good  three  quarters  of  an  hour  by  the  city  bus,  in  rush  hour.  ”Office  time”  as  they  called  it.  I  learnt  that  Gariahat  road  turned  into  Rashbihari  Avenue,  Southern  Avenue  joined  the  Aushutosh  Mukherjee road.

Weekends  would  be  spent  enjoying  good  food  or  movie.  If  that  meant  we  had  to  travel  all  the  way  to  the  north  side  of  the  city  to  ‘Putiram’s',  to  enjoy  their  famous  sweets,  so  be  it.  An  Uttam-Suchitra  movie,  ( romantic  Bengali  star  duo  ),  had  to  be  seen.  A  Bengali  woman  should  be  perfectly  adept  to  discuss  the   the  latest  live  theatre  production  of  Tripti  Mitra,  to  learning  the  subtleties  of  a  Bengali  kitchen.  It  didn’t  matter  if  your  course  work  was  due  the  next  week.  Being  a  well  rounded  person  was  far  more  important  to  her  than  a  geek.

tutorial session-085-2

I  was  in  Kolkata  last  year  about  this  time,  after  a  few  years.  It  was  the  same  familiar  place.

DSC_0491

DSC_0559

The  boxy  yellow  cabs,  the  new  bridge  over  the  river  ’Ganga’,  the  neon  pink  Bougainvellias  draping  the  whitewashed  walls  of  my  Dida’s  house,  the  canopy  of  green  leaves  every  which  way  your  eyes  could  see.

DSC_0582DSC_0504

The  unfamiliarity  inside  the  house   was  striking.  While  I  sat  in the  drawing  room , it  felt  like  Dida  was  busy  in  the  kitchen,  when  I  walked   in  the  bedroom ,  it  felt  Dida  would  emerge  from  the  bathroom  with  a  towel  wrapped  around  her  long  hair.  She  didn’t.  My  Kolkatar  Dida  is  no  more.

Recipe:  Makes ten kochuris

Ingredients;

For  the  filling,

Frozen  peas               One  cup  measure.  Thawed.

Ginger                         Three  quarter  inch.

Green  chillies               Two,  use  your  discretion

Asafoetida                    One  quarter  of  a  tsp

Salt  to  taste

For  the  bread  (  dough  or shell  ):

All  purpose  flour  or  Maida    One  and half cup

Canola  oil                              One  Tbsp  for  the  dough.   More  for  frying.

Salt                                        One  quarter  tsp.

Method;

Filling,

Grind  the  peas , ginger  and  chillies  together  using  very  little  water.  Put  a  nonstick  pan  on  medium  high  heat.  Add  two  tsps  canola  oil.  When  hot,  throw  in  the  Asafoetida.  Stir  for  half  a  minute,  there’ll  be  a  nutty  aroma.    Add  the  ground  filling  mixture . Saute  till  there  is  no  water  left  behind  and  the  colour  has  changed  to  a  hint  of  brown.  Put  the  gas  off,  and  keep  it  aside  to  cool.  Make   small  balls  when  you  can  handle  them.

For  the  shell,

Combine  the  flour,  salt  and  oil  in  a  bowl  and  mix  with  fingers  untill  it  feels  crumbly,  like  making  a  pastry  dough.  Mix  water  a  bit  at  a  time  to  make  a  firm  dough.  Divide  into  small  balls.  Cover  with  a  wet  towel,  let  it  rest  for  half  hour.

To  assemble,  take  a  dough  flatten  it  between  the  palm  of  your  hands  to  about  an  inch  and  a  half  in  diameter.  With  the  first  finger  and  thumb  of  your  right  hand,  pinch  the  edge  all  the  way,  to  make  it  thinner.  Cup  the  left  hand  with  the  flattened  dough  in  it  and  seat  the  filller  in.  Seal  the  edges  of  the   pastry, start  with  right  hand  side  using  the  first  finger  and  thumb  again  slowly  moving  to  the  left,  making  sure  there  is  no  air  trapped  in.  Give  a  good  round  shape  and  let  it  rest  for  a  few  minutes.  Sprinkle  a  few  drops  of  oil  on  the  countertop, to  prevent  the  dough  from  sticking to  the  rolling  pin.  Flatten  the  filled  dough  using  both  hands  so  that  you  have  to  roll less.  Now  carefully  roll  it  into  a  round  shape  about  two  and  a  half  inch  in  diameter.  Deep  fry  both  sides,  till  very  light  yellow  colour.  Collect  them  on  paper  towels  to  get  rid  of  the  extra  oil.

Serve  them  with  any  light  vegetable.  Aloor  dawm,  (recipe  coming  later),  is  the  dish  of  choice.  In  my  household,  we  prefer  with  pickles  or  with  no  side  at  all.

Inside  scoop;

It  does  need  some  practise,  to  roll  them  into  perfect  circles,  just  like  anything  else.  Please  do  not  get  discouraged  if  it  doesn’t  work  out  the  first  time.

There  are  many  variations  to  the  filling,  we  like  with  minimum  spices  to  get  the   sweet  taste  of  peas  as  is.

I  used  frozen  peas  for convenience.  In  Dida’s  house  we  shelled  the  fresh  peas  then  steamed  them.

I  usually  keep it  for  my  cheat  days.  Can’t  avoid  deep  fried  stuff  altogether,  can  we?

Easy stuffed Dates

By  Ratna.

tutorial session-357

I  am  not  an  outdoor  person.  I  prefer  sitting  with  a  cup  of  hot  tea  and  gazing  out  through  the  window.  No  snowboarding  or  icehockey   here.

DSC_0354

DSC_0389

Bloghopping  is  my  favourite  past  time  these  days.  Who  would’nt  like  to  travel  from  Israel  to  India,  Texas  to  Turkey  with  a  click  of  your  mouse.  Visit  a  virtual  friend,  listen  to  their  stories,  take  a  peek  at  what’s  cooking  in  their  kitchen,  feast  with  your  eyes  at  the  beautiful  pictures.  Wouldn’t  you  agree  its  easier  than  losing  your  suitcase,  flights  not  taking  off, or  oh  don’t  forget,  the  slippery  road  conditions.  I  have  gone  a  step  further.  At  the  end  of  another  bloggers post,  it  asked  to  leave  a  comment  regarding  some  food,  which  I  did.  No  double  Jeopardy  questions  or  complex  mathematical  solutions.  Just  a  comment.  I  got  an  email  a  few  days  later  that  I  was  the  winner!  Note  to  self –  remember  to  buy  the  Lotto  max  tickets.

tutorial session-277

As  promised  in  the  post  I  received  a  set  of  cheese  boards  with  cutters  and  best  of  all  Brie  cheese  from  Castello.  Thank  you  ”Keep  Calm  And  Eat  On”.  The  timing  couldn’t  have  been  better, as  I  recently  found  an  interesting  recipe  in  the  December  issue  of  Chatelaine  magazine.  Does  this  scenario  sound  familiar:  guests  are  arriving  soon,  still  not  sure  about  the  appetizers… or  a  last  minute  potluck  notice  at  work,  in  the  middle  of  the  week.  With  just  a  few  things  in  hand  you  can  change  a  disaster  to  a  winner.

tutorial session-293-2

tutorial session-352-2

Recipe:

Ingredient;

Mejdool  Dates                About 10

Brie  Cheese                  One  small packet  125  gms

Pistachio  nuts               Handful

Garlic                            One  Clove  coarsely  chopped

Rosemary  leaves         A  couple  shredded.  (Optional)

Honey                         One Tbsp

Method;

Preheat  the  oven  to  350  degrees  F.  Cut  the  dates  in  half  lengthwise  and  take  the  stone  out.  Keep  them  aside.  Unwrap  the  Brie.  Take  a  sharp  knife  and  make  a  cut  about  3 mm  from  the  periphery,  all  the  way  round.  Now  scoop  the  rind  off  from  the  top.  We  have  now  created  a  ’moat’.  Seat  this  in  an  ovenproof  bowl.  Dump  the  honey,  nuts  and  garlic  in  it.  Sprinkle  with  a  few  cut  pieces  of  the  rosemary  leaf.  Cover  the bowl  with  aluminium  foil.  Bake  at  350  degrees  F  for  about  40-45  mts.  Scoop  up  this  mixture  of  melted  cheese  with  nuts  etc  and  fill  up  the  date  halves.  Arrange  them  on  a  tray  or  platter.  Welcome  your  guests  with  a  big  smile!

Inside  Scoop;

All  amounts  can  be  adjusted  as  per  taste. I  prefer  the  gooey  cheese  hence  I  melted  it  in  the  oven.  The  recipe  in  the  magazine  called  for  goat  cheese  and  pecan  nuts.  I  added  the  crushed  garlic,  which  I  thought  cut  the  sweetness  of  almost  everything  else.  It  took  very  little  time  from  start  to  finish.