How to cook a no-fail, fluffy bowl of rice in a pan.

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-3

In  my  world  rice  can  be  synonymous  with  life.

The  grains  of  rice  are  so  intertwined  with  the  thread  of  life  that  by  pulling  on  one,  you  may  fray  the  other.  Rice  occupies  a  sacred  place  in  my  culture.

No  important  milestone  can  be  complete  without  rice.  The  first  solid  food  given  to  a  child  Mukhe  bhat,  literally  meaning  mouth  rice,  is  a  big  affair.  The  young  bride  walking  in  the  groom’s  house  is  marked  with  Bou  Bhat  or  bride  rice.  As  a  token  of  accepting  her  shared  responsibility  in  the  new  household  she  serves  rice  to  the  family  members. 

untitled-4

 Everyday  life  events  are  talked  about  with  a  string  of  rice  attached.  For  example, ‘  ‘It  was  Dudh  bhat,  translates  to  milk  rice  would  mean,  it  was  simple.  Dozing  off  after  lunch  would  be ‘ Bhat  ghum’,  or  rice  sleep  also  known  as  the  carb  induced  coma.  A  very  homey  invitation  would  be  ‘Bhat  kheye  jao’,  come  eat  rice.  I  can  go  on  and  on.

Boil  in  water  it  satiates,  grind  it  and  add  to  batter  to  give  a  crunch,  puffs  up  to  Murmura  or  “puffed  rice”. It  can  be  beaten  into  Poha  or  “thickened  rice, or made into  a  fermented  batter  for  lovely  crepes.  If  I  was  allowed  only  one  ingredient  to  have  in  my  pantry  that  could  keep  me  full,  yes,  that  would  be  rice.

untitled

Cooking  rice  did  not  start  from  washing  the  grains  in  water  as  we  are  used  to  doing  now.  I  remember  my  mother  using  a  wicker  bowl,  Kulo  or  soop,  to  separate  any  husks  or  stones  from  the  rice  grains.  Eyes  fixed  to  the  kulo,  she  would  easily  carry  on  a  conversation,  reminding  us  not  to  forget  to  pack  the  lunch  bag  for  school  or  give  out  the  grocery  list  to  my  dad,  Baba  as  we  addressed  him.  A  gentle  pat  at  the  back  of  the  Kulo,  would  make  the  husks  fly  out,  then  a  quick  run  with  fingers  to  pick  left  over  stones  if  any.

We  did  not  own  a  rice  cooker  or  fancy  measuring  cups.  Rice  was  always  cooked  in  a  pot,  Handi.  An  empty  old   Nestle’s  sweetened  condensed  milk  tin  that  had  seen  better  days  was  saved  to  serve  as  a  cup  measure.  Life  was  very  simple.

I  am  the  proud  owner  of   RC3406  Black  and  Decker  6  cup  rice  cooker  now.  The  non  stick  pot  has  a  tempered  glass  lid.  The  unit  even  boasts  of  automatically  switching  from  cook  to  warm  when  done.  Habits  die  hard  though.  Instead  of  me  embracing  the  cooker  for  my  rice,  a  plastic  cover  has  instead  embraced  the  gadget  and  it  sits  on  the  back  of  the  very  top  shelf  in  my  pantry.

The  method  of  rice  cooking  which  I  am  sharing  with  you  works  for  me  every  time.  You  are  a  star  if  the  grains  of  rice  stay  separate  and  not  clumped.

Recipe:  Serves  4.

Ingredients;

Basmati  rice                                                           2  cups

Water                                                                       See  below

Sauce  pan  with  a  tight  fitting  lid.

Method;

Wash  the  rice  with  water.  Drain  the  water  out.

In  a  sauce  pan  take  the  above  rice.  Add  water.  The  amount  of  water  is  crucial.  This  is  how  I  measure  it.  Dip  the  fingers  of  your  right  hand  in  this  water.  (  The  figure  below  with  the  left  hand  gives  an  indication  ).  The  tip  of  the  middle  finger  gently  touching  the  top  surface  of  the  rice,  the  water  should  come  up  to  the  first  mark  on  the  inside  of  this  finger.  Repeat  this  measure  in  two  or  three  points  on  the  rice  surface,  to  get  an  average.  Add  or  deduct  water  accordingly.

untitled-5

Put  this  pan  on  high  heat  uncovered.  Wait  till  it  comes  to  a  boil  about  4          minutes.  Let  it  boil  until  it  forms  white  foam  on  the  surface,  another  2  minutes.  Cover  with  a  tight  fitting  lid  now  and  put  the  gas  off,  in  this  case  it  was  6  minutes  from  start.  Let  the  pan  sit  on  the  same  spot  on  the  gas  burner.   Do  not,  please  do  not  open  to  take  a  peek.  Let  it  sit  for  15  minutes  after  switching  the  gas  off.

The  rice  should  now  be  ready.  Fluff  it  up  with  a  fork  and  serve  hot  with  your choice  of  curries.

Inside  Scoop;

I  have  used  ‘Swad  Dehradun’  Basmati  rice.

Additives  like  salt  or  oil  have  sometimes  been  used  ,  I  prefer  mine  simple.

I  cooked  on  a  Frigidair  stove  top.  Sometimes  different  stoves  could  cause  a  minor  difference.

 

 

 

Kumror Chhakka ; Pumpkin sixer

Image

By  Ratna,

untitled-4

Pumpkin what?

I  know  I  have  some  explanation  to  do  here.  You  see  the  word  Chhakka  in  Bengali  means  a  sixer.

A  sixer?  What  is  that  supposed  mean?

Well  for  those  of  you  who  are  familiar  with  the  game  of  cricket,  sixer  is  a  score.  When  the  ball  is   hit  to  cross  the  boundary,  the  batsman  scores  six  runs  in  one  go.

If  you  have  played  ‘Snake  and  ladder’,  the  dice  has  a  score  of  six,  which  is  also  referred  to  as  Chhakka.

In  other  words  it  is  much  desirable.

untitled

I  have  no  clue  how  an  ordinary  Pumpkin  got  to  score  this  high  though.  Let  me  try  to  use  my  artistic  license  to  visualize  a  story  here.

Say  it  is  early  nineteenth  century  rural  Bengal.  Women  stayed  in  the  house  to  rear  the  family.  Cleaning,  cooking,  washing  clothes  kept  her  busy  the  whole  day.  The  menfolk  looked  after  the  outside  world.  Dressed  in  dhoti  and  a  loose  top,  tending  to  their  handlebar  moustache,  they  would  sometimes  peek,  through  their  thick,  round  tortoise  shelled  glasses  towards  the  general  direction  of  the  kitchen.  The  master  reassuring  himself  that  all  is  well  in  his  universe.

untitled-5

Maybe,  just  maybe  in  one  of  those  days,  the  master  had  invited  one  of  his  bosses  for  lunch.  Considering  the  period  it  wouldn’t  be  out  of  place  to  think  it  was  a  British  officer.  That  was  the  time  the  East  India  company  was  making  inroads  to  Bengal.  It  was  expected  that  would  be  a  five  course  meal,  how  else  could  he  impress  his  senior?

Ihar  naam  ki?’   What  is  the  name  of  this  dish,  the  officer  might  have  enquired.  Unsure  himself  the  master  might  have  called  out  ‘Ginni,  eta  ki  baniyecho?’,  Homemaker,  what  have  you  cooked?

Now  the  story  inside  the  kitchen  was  different.  Maybe  the  supplies  were  low  for  some  reason.  The  ladies  were  unable  to  whip  up  the  multiple  courses.  Potatoes  and  dried  grams  are  a  staple.  The  pumpkin  could  be  just  maturing  in  the  kitchen  garden.  As  a  last  minute  thing  the  elders  in  the  kitchen  whipped  this  mish  mash  up  and  gave  it a  fancy  name.

Whatever  the  story,  this  is  a  humble,  earthy  dish  goes  well  with  plain  white  rice  or  pooris.

If  any  of  you  have  a  different  story  I  would  be  very  interested  to  learn  about  it.

Recipe:  Serves  2  as  main.

Ingredients:

Pumpkin  cut  in  small  cubes                                          2  Cups

Potatoes  cut  similarly                                                      1/2  cup

Whole  red  chillies                                                            2  or  3  ( optional )

Green  chillies                                                                   2

Bengal  grams                                                                 1/4 cup

Roasted,  ground  cumin  seeds                                      1/2  tsp  and  1/2  tsp

Roasted  ground  coriander  seeds                                  1/2   tsp

Fenugreek  seeds                                                            1/2  tsp

Cumin  seeds                                                                   1/2  tsp

Asafoetida  ( hing )                                                           1/4  tsp

Grated  ginger                                                                  1/2  tsp

Jaggery  ( Gur )                                                                 1/2  tsp

Ghee                                                                                 1  Tbsp

Canola  oil                                                                          1  Tbsp

Salt                                                                                    To  taste

Method;

Soak the  grams  overnight  with  water.  Next  morning  boil  them  till soft.

In  a  non  stick  pan  on  high  heat  take  a  Tbsp  of  Canola  oil.  Add  the  cumin  seeds,  green  chillies,  or  red  if  you  are  using,  and  Fenugreek  seeds.  As  soon  as  they  start  to  change  colour  add  the  hing.  Wait  for  20  seconds  till  you  get  a  nutty  aroma,  throw  in  the  potatoes,  turmeric  powder,  ginger  paste  and  salt.  Cover  and  cook  on  a  medium  flame  now,  till  the  potatoes  are  tender.  If  it  gets  very  dry  sprinkle  a  table  spoon  of water,  to  prevent  the  spices  from  getting  burnt.

Next  add  the  pumpkin  pieces  and  stir  such  they  are  well  coated  with  the  spices.  Throw  in  the  boiled  gram  and  jaggery.  As  soon  as  the  pumpkin  is  soft  switch  the  gas  off.  Add  a  Tbsp  of  ghee  and  sprinkle  1/2  tsp  of  the  roasted  ground  cumin powder.  Keep  it  covered  until  serving.

Enjoy  with  rice  or  Pooris.

Inside  Scoop;

I  used  Butternut  Squash.

The  chillies,  red  and  green  are  only  for  flavour.  Take  them  out  before serving.

The  pumpkin  pieces  should  still  be  holding  shape  not  a  mush.

Every  family  has  their  own  version  of  chhakka,  with  minor  differences.

Bengal  grams  are  available  as  “Kala  chana”  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

Ginni  is  the  short  form  of  the  word  Grihini.  It  was  customary  to  address  the  wife  this  way  as  opposed  to  the  first  name.

 

 

 

 

Tomato and cottage cheese salad

Image

By  Ratna

untitledThe  garden  outside  is  covered  with  a  thick  blanket  of  snow.  Staring  out  from  my  kitchen  window,  my  mind  skips  the  white  stuff  and  races  to  the  next  summer.   A  time  when  we  can  feel  the  dirt  again,  which  here  in  the  Prairies  could  be  well into  late  April.

It  feels  I  have  extra  time  in  hand  now.   There  is  no  watering  of  plants,  no  looking  for  new  flower  under  the  leaves  or  even  if  the  caterpillar  got  half  of  the  missing  leaf  again.

untitled

I  waited  till  the  very  end  to  harvest  the  last  of  the  tomatoes  and  the  grapes.  There  were  tomatoes  that  were  red  and  ripe,  then  there  were  the  pale  yellow  ones  and  finally  the  rudimentary  green  ones.  Soon  after,  I  started  contemplating  how  to  photograph  them,  and  more  importantly  what  to  cook  with  them.

untitled-5

It  was  as  if  a  new  mum  was  photographing  her  first  born.  Is  this  angle  better  or  that,  is  the  light  showing  well  on  the  pale  ones  or  not,  mmmmm..  I  think  I  need  a  different  prop!

untitled-4

I  couldn’t  help  but  put  all  the  pictures  here.  You  have  the  liberty  to  take  your  pick.

Fresh,  plump  and  juicy  tomatoes, only  a  salad  would  do  justice  to  the  taste.  No  boiling,  baking,  grilling  but  just  the  way  they  are.

Today’s  recipe  is  not  a  rigid  one,  as  such.  I  have  assembled  this  salad  to  enjoy  the  last  of  the  freshest  vegetables  from  my  garden.

You  are  welcome  to  try  this  salad  my  way.  I  wouldn’t  mind  at  all  if  you  just  walk  away  from  this  and  create  your  own.  Leave  a  note  for  me  please,  I  would  love  to  hear  and  see  your  take  on  this.

Recipe:  Serves  2.

Ingredients;

Chopped  Fresh  tomatoes                                                     2  cups

Ribboned  cucumber                                                              1/2  cup

Julienned  Carrots                                                                   1/2  cup

Grapes                                                                                    1/2  cup

Cottage  cheese                                                                      1/2  cup

Slivered  almonds                                                                     1  Tbsp

Chaat  masala                                                                          To  taste

Chopped  Cilantro                                                                   1  tsp

Tamarind  Dressing                                                                   To  taste.

Method;

Assemble  the  ingredients,  dress  it  up  to  your  liking,  garnish  with  cilantro  and  enjoy,

Tamarind  dressing  recipe  can  be  found  here.

Inside  Scoop;

Chaat  masala  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

Sandesh: Cheese fudge

Image

By  Ratna,

untitled-4

Wish  you  all  a  very  happy  Diwali.  Raise  your  hands  if  you  agree  festivals  and  sweets  are  inseparable.  More  the  merrier,  may  I  add.

Sweets  made  from  home  made  cheese  or  Chhena,  is  popular  in  Bengal.  Chhena  mixed  with  sugar  results  in  Sandesh.  Throw  in  different  flavours  like  Rose  water,  Kewra  essence,  mango  or  saffron  for  variety.  Trending  of  late  are  chocolate,  strawberry  and  so  much  more.

untitled-2

Living  in  a  small  Prairie  town  we  do  not  have  the  luxury  to  buy  Sandesh  from  a  corner  store.  Consulting  the  net,  many  trials  and  errors,  exchanging  notes  with  friends  with  similar  interest,  results  in  the  making  of  traditional  Indian  sweets.

untitled

This  is  Sandesh  in  its  purest  form.  Chhena  and  a  bit  of  sugar  with  some  garnishings.

Do  you  like  traditonal  Indian  desserts?  What  is  your  favourite  Sandesh?

Recipe:  Depending  on  the  size,  about  22- 24  pieces.

Ingredients;

Full  fat  milk                                                            4L

Sugar                                                                      1  cup

Lemon  juice                                                            6  Tbsp

Cardamom  powder                                                1/2  tsp

Pistachio  slivers,  ground                                        1  Tbsp

Rose  petals  to  garnish                                          1  tsp

Method;

Add  6  Tbsps  water  to  the  lemon  juice  and  keep  aside.

In  a  heavy  bottomed  pan,  bring  the  milk  to  a  boil.  As  soon  as  it  comes  to  a  rolling  boil,  put  the  gas  off.  Transfer  the  pan  on  a  wire  rack  for  the  milk  to  cool  a  bit,  about  5  minutes.  Add  the  lemon  juice  mixture  little  bit  at  a  time.  Look  for  the  milk  to  curdle.  Stop  adding  any  more  lemon  juice  as  soon  as  you  see  the  milk  solids  separated  from  the  light  green  coloured  whey.

Drain  this  over  a  cheese  cloth.  Pour  some  water  over  the  cheese  to  take  away  the  lemon  flavour.  You  can  save  the  whey  to  be  used  later.  Collect  all  the  four  sides  of  the  cheese  cloth  and  wring  it  hard  to  let  all  the  water  drain  out.  Keep  it  hanging  this  way,  for  about  15  –  20  minutes  more  to  get  a  moisture  free  Chenna  (  cheese  ).

On  a  cutting  board  take  the  Chenna  and  knead  with  your  fingers  for  about  5-6  minutes.  It  is  done  when  pinching  a  small  piece  out  and  rolling  it  between  the  palm  of  your  hands  will  form  a  smooth  ball.

Add  the  sugar  and  mix  evenly.

Take  a  non  stick  pan  on  a  medium  low  flame.  Transfer  the  above  Chhena  mixture  to  this  pan  and  saute.  There  will  be  a  bit  of  moisture  released  from  the  sugar.  Add  the  cardamom  powder.  Continue  on  the  flame  till  all  the  water  is  gone  and  the  mixture  leaves  the  side  of  the  pan  to  form  a  soft  dough.  About  10-12  minutes.

Put  the  gas  off.  Transfer  the  above  mixture  to  a  plate.  You  can  either  divide  them  in  small  balls  or  give  them  a  specific  shape  using  molds.

If  using  molds,  take  a  spoonful  mixture,  form  it  into  a  ball  and  then  carefully  press  it  into  the  mold  and  then  remove  it.

Garnish  with  crushed  pistachio  and  rose  petals.

Inside  scoop;

When  boiling  the milk,  keep  stirring  to  prevent  it  from  sticking  to  the  bottom  of  the  pan.

When  sauteing  the  Chhena  and  sugar  mixture,  careful  not  to  overdo.  It  can  then  become  crumbly.  If  this  does  happen  though,  give  it  a  good  knead,  till  it  becomes  smooth  again.

Putting  it  through  the  mold  could  be  a  bit  challenging.  If  you  do  not  get  the  desired  shape,  form  into  a  ball,  wash  your  hands  with  water,  and  try  again.

Sandesh  making  needs  a  bit  of  practise,  but  if  I  can  do  it,  you  can  too.

 

 

Rajasthani Kadhi: Chickpea flour soup from Rajasthan: GF

Image

By   Ratna

untitled-6

The  snow  has  been  coming  down  continuously  for  three  days  now.  It  is  powdery  once  and  flaky  at  other  times.  The  lakes  are  frozen,  the  Geese  have  left  us  for  warmer  pastures.  With  food  being  scarce  the  lonely  fox  sometimes  is  seen  trotting  over  the  thin  ice  foraging  for  leftovers.untitled

 untitled-7

Cold  weather  calls  for  warm  food.  In  my  recent  trip  to  Rajasthan  we  savoured  the  local  food.  Kadhi  is  a  soup  that  I  enjoyed  for  its  simplicity.  The  perfect  balance  of  salt,  sour  and  heat,  it  is  ready  in  no  time.  The  fact  that  it  is  gluten  free  is  a  bonus.

The  yoghurt  needs  to  be  very  sour.  The  Greek  yoghurt  that  I  have  used  was  far  from  that.  I  took  help  from  a  few  squeezes  of  lemon  juice.

Traditionally  this  is  served  with  rice.  The  northern  Canadian  weather  prompted  me  to  improvise.  I  carried  it  in  a  flask  for  a  road  trip.  As  I  took  a  couple  sips  of  it  on  a  break  during  the  drive,  I  was  instantly  transported  to  a  far  off  land  with  sand  dunes  and  red  chillies  left  out  to  dry.

The  laughter  of  the  kids  with  mitts  giving  final  touches  to  the  snow  man  round  the  corner  brought  me  back  to  reality…

untitled-8

Recipe:  Serves  2.

Ingredients;

Chickpea  flour                                                         1/3 rd  cup

Sour  Yoghurt                                                           1  cup

Water                                                                        2  cups.

Salt                                                                           To  taste

Lemon  juice                                                             1  tsp  (  optional  )

Turmeric  powder                                                     1/2  tsp ( optional )

For  Tadka;

Ghee                                                                        1  Tbsp

Asafoetida  ( Hing )                                                   A   pinch

Mustard  seeds                                                         1  tsp

Curry  leaves                                                              10  or  15

Red  chilli  powder                                                      1  tsp

Whole  dry  red  chillies                                              2  or  3

Almond  slivers                                                         1  tsp  to  garnish  ( optional )

Method;

In  a  heavy  bottomed  saucepan  whisk  the  flour  and  yoghurt  till  it  has  no  lumps. Add  the  water  and  mix  thoroughly.

Put  the  gas  on  high  and  bring  this  mixture  to  a  boil,  stirring  all  the  time.  Add  salt.  Crank  the  heat  down  to  medium  soon  after,  and  let  it  simmer  for  20  minutes  with  an  occasional  stir.  Put  the  gas  off.

Heat  the  ghee  on  high  in  another  small  pan.  Add  the  mustard  seeds,  Hing,  whole  red  chillies.  Wait  for  the  seeds  to  sputter,   throw  in  the  red  cilli  powder,  curry  leaves.  Put  the  gas  off  and  pour  this  into  the  Kadhi.

Serve  right  away.  I  garnished  with  a  few  slivers  of  almonds.

Inside  Scoop;

The  whole  red  chilli  is  added  for  flavour  only,  I  would  take  it  out  before  serving.

The  soup  can  be  thick  or  runny,  tweak  it  to  your  taste.

I  had  to  add  a  few  drops  of  lemon  juice  to  get  the  right  balance.

Chick pea  flour  or  Besan  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores  or  in  the  World  food  aisle  of  Super  Store  or  Walmart.

 

4 days in Jabardasht ( Incredible ) Jaipur

Image

By  Ratna

( Recipe in the next post )

untitled-51

Jaipur  in  Rajasthan  is  a  city  of  Kings  and  Queens,  of  camels  and  elephants,  of Palaces  and  marble  quarries.   It  is  a  city  of  pink  walls  and  pink  sandstone  buildings. It  is  a  city  of  men  with  brightly  coloured  turbans  and  women  with  equally  bright  saris  contrasting  the  ochre  desert  behind,  of  innocent  eyes  and  hearty  smiles  and  above  all,  of  great  food.

I  would  like  to  share  with  you  what  we  saw  and  what  we  ate.

“There  are  over  900 small  windows”,  he  said  pointing  his  index  finger  upwards.  This  was  followed  by  a  palpable  pause,  as  if  giving  us  time  to  come  to  terms  with  the  information  he  just  shared.  Amit,  a  vivacious  twenty  something  was  our  tour  guide  showing  around  Hawa  Mahal.  Palace  of  winds  as  it  is  otherwise  known  as,  is  an  iconic  landmark  of  Jaipur,  India.  untitled-55    Ladies  of  the  royal  families  enjoyed  the  outdoors  from  this  Palace,  without  themselves  being  visible.untitled-58

The  City  Palace  gives  a  splendid  glimpse of  the  erstwhile  royal  life.  The  textile  exhibits,  the  armouries  were  worth  spending  time  for.

My  eyes  were  drawn  to  the  shiny  pots  being  neatly  arranged  for  some  celebration  later  in  the  evening.  Just    imagine  their  exquisite  contents  !

untitled-57untitled-59Jantar  Mantar,  our  next  attraction,  literally  translates  to  “Calculating  Instrument”.  Completed  in  1734  it  allowed  the  observation    of  Astronomical  positions  with  the  naked  eye.untitled-53   The  majestic  Amer  Fort  rising  against  the  blue  sky  was  our  next  destination.    The  grand  architecture,  the  geometric  columns,  the  filigreed  windows  transported me  to  the  days  gone  by.untitled-63untitled-64 Romance,  intrigue,  drama.  I  wondered  what  other  emotions  must  have  gone  through  the  walls.  If  only  they  could  speak!untitled-65 It  was  time  to  head  out  for  some  food.  Amit  directed  us  to  the  “Pink  city”  restaurant.  We  wanted  to  try  the  local  food.  The  place  was  packed  with  locals  and  tourists  alike.  We  started  with  sweet  lassi,  a  yoghurt  drink  garnished  generously  with  pistachio  nuts  and  rose  syrup.untitled-60    The  vegetarian  Thali  (plate),  is  an  elaborate  affair,  containing  nine  or  ten  small  bowls  neatly  arranged  around  a  big  dinner  plate.  Mouth  watering  yoghurt  dish,  soul  satisfying  lentils,  curry  made  with  Poppadums,  dry  dish  with  cauliflower,  raita,  rice  pudding  each  calling  my  name.  Rice  and  two  different  flatbreads,  salad  to  accompany  the  above.untitled-61

The  next  food  stop  was  at  “Virasat”,  a  royal  dining  affair.  Plush  low  seating,  silverware,  live  traditional  music,  complete  with  a  throne  for  a  photo  opportunity.

untitled-50 The  roadside  had  a  variety  of  vendors,  from   sweet  cotton  candy  to  spicy  Poppadums.

untitled-52untitled-54

We  took  a  day  trip  to  Pushkar,  a  couple  hours  outside  Jaipur. This  sleepy  little  town  comes  to  life  in  November  when  it  holds  the  largest  cattle  fair  in  the  world.

untitled-38

We  were  `spoilt  for  choices  of  transport  here.  There  was  the  luxury  tourist  bus,  air  conditioned  sedan  and  brightly  decorated  double  humped  camels.  Take  your  pick.

untitled-43

Different  shaped  sweets  decorated  with  rose  petals  or  pistachio  nuts  adorned  the  sides  of  the  road.

untitled-41untitled-42untitled-44

Evenings  were spent  enjoying  the  traditional  folk  dances.  Ladies  with  brightly  coloured  outfits  swirled  around  balancing  a  pile  of  pots  on  their  heads.

untitled-46

Our  stay  was  too  short  and  we  could  only  touch  the  tip  of  the  iceberg.

I  would  like  to  go  back  for  a  longer  holiday.

“Khambagani”,  as  they  say  respectfully.

Notes:

I  lost  this  page  after  a  computer  glitch.  My  apologies  if  you  followed  the  link  from  fb  and  was  unable  to  find  this  post,  I  have  also  lost  the  previous  comments.

Apple and Raspberry lattice mini pies

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-3

I  have  been  away  for  a  bit.  Not  that  I  flew  to  a  fancy  destination  or  drove  around  the  country,  but  a  staycation,  as  they  say.  I  had  family  visiting.  Days  were  busy  eating  and  cooking,  cooking  and  eating,  catching  up  with  each  other.

Then  when  I  finally  got  my  house  back  and  looked  outside,  there  was  a  definite  change  in  the  weather.  Days  were  shorter,  leaves  yellow  and  harvesting  is  on.

There  are  apples  everywhere.  The  trees  so  heavy  with  the  fruits  that  the  branches  are  bent  almost  touching  the  ground.  The  overripe  ones  strewn  on  the  ground  like  a  carpet. The  raspberry  bushes  have  past  their  peak,  but  still  had  some  berries  next  to  the  yellow  leaves.

untitled-5

The  July  issue  of  the  Saveur  magazine  had  a  wonderful  picture  of  Blackberry- Plum  Lattice  pie.  This  was  my  inspiration  for  today’s  recipe.  I  tweaked  it  a  bit  here  and  there.  I  have  used  Apples  and  Raspberries  instead,  skipped  the  shortening,  added  a  bit  of  raspberry  jam  to make  up  for  the  fruit,  which  I  ran  short  of.  I  also  used  small  3  inches  individual  foil  pie  pan  than  a  bigger  one  as  shown  in  the  recipe.

untitled-6

Enjoy  the  pie  at  room  temperature  or  warm  it  if  you  like.  A  dollop  of  vanilla  ice  cream  by  its  side  and  you are  good  to  go…

Recipe:  Made  6  three  inch  wide  mini  pies.

Ingredients;

For  the  pie  crust;

2  cups  All  purpose  flour

1  cup  or  2  sticks  cold  unsalted  butter  cut  in  cubes

Salt  1/2  tsp

Cold  sour  cream  1/2  cup

1/2  tsp  baking  powder

For  the  filling;

6  cups  cubed  apples

1/2  cup  raspberries

1/2  cup  raspberry  jam

2  tbsp  granulated  sugar

1  tsp  vanilla  extract

1/2  tsp  salt

5  tbsp  cornstarch

For  garnish;

2  tbsp  coarse  sugar  for  dusting

Method;

Make  the  dough;

Whisk  together  the  flour,  salt  and  baking  powder  in  a  large  bowl.  Add  the  cubed  butter  to the  bowl  and  use  your  fingers  to  work the  butter  into  the  flour  until  the  mixture  resembles  wet  sand.

Stir  in  the  sour  cream,  then  turn  the  dough  onto  a  well  floured  work  surface.  Knead  the  dough  a  few  times  until  it  comes  together,  adding  more  flour  if  needed.  Flatten  the  dough  to  a  1/2  inch disc,  then  fold  it  over  itself.  Flatten  and  fold  four  additional  times  to  form  layers.  Wrap it  in  plastic  and  refrigerate  overnight. Take  the  dough  out  of  the  refrigerator  15-20  minutes  before  you  are  ready  to  roll  it  out.

Make  the  filling;

Combine  the  apple  pieces,  berries,  sugar,  jam,  vanilla,  and  salt  in  a  large  bowl  and  let  stand  for  30  minutes.  Strain  the  juices,  sprinkle  the  fruit  with  cornstarch  and  mix  well  to  dissolve  the  starch.

Assemble  the  pie;

Preheat  the  oven  to  400  degrees F.  Grease  the  pie  pans.  Dust  the  countertop  with  flour  and  roll  half  of  the  dough  into  6  by  14  inches.  I  inverted  the  3  inch  pie  pan  and  cut  out  6  circles,  each  a  little  wider  than  the  pan,  about  4  inches  diameter.  Collect  the  scraps  and  roll  out  again  if  needed.  Gently  lift  the  crusts  and  settle  them  into  each  pie  plate.  Pour  the  fruit  mixture  into  the  crusts  and  press it  down  evenly.

Roll  the  second  half  of  the  crust  again  into  6  by  14  inches.  With  a  fluted  pastry  cutter  cut  into  1/4  inch  strips.  To  form  a  lattice  design  follow  this  video.

Dust  the  pies  with  coarse  sugar.  Chill  them  in  a  refrigerator  for  15  minutes.

Bake  in  the  preheated  oven  for  20 minutes.  Lower  the  temperature  to  350  degrees and  bake  for  another  40  minutes.  The  juices  should  be  bubbly  and  crust  evenly  golden.

Let  the  pie  cool  completely  for  2  hours  before  serving.