Horchata de Chufa. Modified . DF, GF

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-13

If  you’ve  read  my  last  post  you  know  I  am  still  trying  to  adjust  from  a  beautiful  plus  21  C  to  an  awe  fully  cold  minus  21  C.

untitled-4

I  am  living  in  memories.untitled-3

Horchata  is  a  very  Spanish  drink  that  we  enjoyed  in  my  recent  trip  there.  It  was  sweet  with  a  nutty  flavour.untitled-11

Chufa  is  also  known  as  Tiger  nuts.  It  really  isn’t  a  nut  in  the  strictest  sense,  for  it  is  a  tuber  that  grows  under  ground  attached  to  the  roots  of  Cyperus  esculentus.

untitled-12

I  have  learnt  that  these  nuts  act  as  diuretic,  high  in  fibre,  iron,  potassium  and  vitamin  E.  You  can  find  small  stalls  like  ice  cream  stalls  selling  Horchatas.  I  think  they  are  called  Horchaterias.

untitled-7

In  a  hot  summer  day  it  could  be  really  refreshing  to  take  a  sip  of  cold  Horchata.  This  drink   is  usually  served  with  a  farton.  A  long  pastry  with  a  bit  of  icing  on  top.

The  weather  here  is  far  from  summer.  Having  said  that  the  days  are  slowly  getting  longer.  The  sky  is  not  as  dark  these  days  on  my  way  to  work.  That  itself  is  a  matter  of  great  joy.  We  live  with  hope.  Don’t  we?

I  bought  these  nuts  from  Mercado  Central,  a  very  big  Farmer’s  market  in  Spain.  I  have  been  told  it  is  available  online  from  amazon.com

This  recipe  is  not  exactly  what  I  tried  there.

I  put  some  Indian  flavours  in  this  traditional  Spanish  drink.

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Tiger  nuts              1  cup

Water                     4  cups  (  approx  )

Sugar                     To  taste

Rose  water            1  Tsp

Rose  petals           1  tsp

Method;

Wash  the nuts  carefully  with  water  and  then  soak  them  in  water  for  about  14  hours.

Grind  them  in  a  mixer  with  little  water  into  a  soft  paste.  Strain  the  liquid  through  a  cheese  cloth.  Discard  the  solids.  Add  water  to  bring  it  to  a  milk  like  consistency.  You  can  adjust  the  amount  of  water  to  suit  your  liking.

Add  sugar  to  your  taste.  I  added  rose  water  too  for  some  nice  fragrance.  Garnish  with  rose  petals.  Refrigerate  and  enjoy  the  chilled  drink.

Inside  scoop;

Rose  water  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  store.  A  little  goes  a  long  way.

 

Valencia, Espana.

Image

 

By Ratna

(  Recipe  in  the  next  post  )untitled-64

I  am  just  back  from  Spain ,  from  a  balmy  plus  21  degrees  C  to  a  freezing  minus  21  C,  less  one  suitcase  and  severe  jet  lagged.  Waking  up  at  weird  hours  has  its  advantages  too,  wouldn’t  you  agree?  How  else  could  I  sort  out  the  hundreds  of  pictures  that  I  took,  or  draft  my  blog?

I  cannot  decide  was  it  the  warm  Mediterranean  climate  or  the  warm  people,  fresh  fruits  and  vegetables  or  the  shot  of  Espresso  that  makes  me  wanting  to  move  there.  Or  was  it  the  laid  back  lifestyle  and  the  Sangria?  I  can’t  make  up  my  mind..  One  thing  is  sure  though,  Spain  is  calling  my  name.

It  was  family  time  well  spent.  The  day  started  with  Desayonos,  or  short  breakfast.

untitled-71  An  espresso  with  a  toast.  The  choice  for  the  topping  could  either  be  butter  and  jam  or  tomato  puree  and  fresh  olive  oil.  Later  in  the  morning  came   Almuerzo,  the  big  breakfast.

Coffee  to  go,  you  say?  No. No  por  favor.  No  please.   Life  can  never  be  so  busy  that  a  coffee  cannot  be  enjoyed  sitting  down.  Comida  or  lunch  was  followed  by  a  siesta  where  all  the  shops  close  down.  Cena  or  supper  is  a  late  affair.  Tapas  can  be  after  lunch,  while  deciding  on  supper.

Don’t  you  just  love  the  food  time  table?

Oranges, Oranges…

Where  do  I  even  start  the  story  of  oranges.  You  see,  growing  up  in  India  I  am  used  to  seeing  mango  trees,  guavas  hanging  from  trees  or  banana  blossom  with  bunches  of  fruit  attached.  After  I  moved  to  the  west  my  eyes  popped  to  see  apples  hanging  from  trees.

But  oranges?  I  had  never  seen  them  on  trees.  Ever.

Imagine  my  excitement  when  I  saw  rows  and  rows  of  fruiting  orange  trees  on  either  side  of  pretty  much  all  roads.  There  were  some  scattered  on  the  ground  too!

Just  like  that..

untitled-75

The  visit  to  Mercado  Central  was  high  on  my  list.  Situated  in  the  old  part  of  town,  merchandise  has  changed  hands  continually  since  Roman  times.

untitled-10untitled-11. The  great  exterior  leads  to  a  fantastic  interior.  A  real  treat  to  the  eyes.

untitled-96

From  fresh  vegetables  and  fruits,  all  locally  grown,  to  Paella  pans,  Jamons,  Horchata,  Fish  and  seafood,  ceramic  dishes,  olive  oil,  candied  oranges,  almonds,  figs,  and  other  fruits,  you  have  it  all.  Be  there  early,  the  market  closes  early  afternoon.

Needless  to  say  I  felt  like  a  kid  in  a  candy  store.

The  Playa  de  la  Reina  housed  the  beautiful  cathedral,  flanked  by  souvenir  stores  and  cafes.

untitled-56We  watched  the  day  go  by  over  a  cup  of  molten  chocolate  and  crispy  churros  in  ‘Cafe  Valor’.  Oh  what  a  treat  that  was!

Torres  de  Serranos  is  a  gate  that  formed  part  of  the  ancient  wall  around  the  city.untitled-26Torres  de  Quart,  are  twin  gothic  style  towers  also  built  as  part  of  a  wall  around  the  city.  It  bears  scars  of  canons  from  when  the  city  was  under  seige  by  the  french.

If  only  the  walls  could  speak,  I  wondered…

untitled-89untitled-90

Museo  Nacional  de  Ceramica,  the  Porcelain  Museum  although  closed,  had  an  exquisite  entrance.

untitled-84I  ran  my  fingers  on  the  carved  marble  and  marvelled  at  the  magnificient  carvings.

Playa  de  Virgen,  is  home  to  the  Valencia  Cathedral.  Built  in  Gothic  and  Baroque  style,  with  Corinthian  pillars  to  boost,  what  a  treat  to  the  eyes  that  was.

untitled-44untitled-85untitled-46

We  had  a  day  by  the  beach.  Not  exactly  a  day  for  beach  but  we  made  it  anyways.

The  Mediterranean  sea,  so  vital  for  the  life  of  this  city.  Traders,  conquerers,  visitors  made  way  to  the  city  built  in  the  first  century  BC.

Paella  tasting  was  a  must.  Patatas  bravas  or  fried  potatoes  was  a  comfort  food  that  we  enjoyed  with  a  side  of  garlic  heavy  aioli.  Sangria  can  be  enjoyed  any  time.

untitled-21untitled-61

Plaza  de  Toros,  is  a  Colosseum  looking  building  used  for  bull  fighting.  I  was  happy  clicking  pictures,  only  from  outside.

untitled-91untitled-92

Are  you  tired  of  Gothic  architecture?  Let  me  take  you  to  Ciudad  de  les  artes  y  las  ciencias,  City  of  the  arts  and  science.

Housing  the  Aquarium,  performing  arts  building,  Science  museum  this  was  a  super  modern  architecture.

untitled-59

With  no  snow  around,  the  nativity  scenes  and  cute,  climbing  Santas  reminded  us,  that  it  was  in  fact  Christmas  season.untitled-99untitled-83

The  only  regret  I  had  was  I  did  not  get  as  many  sunny  days.  My  pictures  did  not  turn  out  as  I  wanted  them  to  even  after  a  little  bit  of  help  from  Lightroom.  Oh  well,  now  I  have  to  plan  a  trip  in  summer…

untitled-30

This  was  not  my  first  trip  to  Spain.  You  can  read  about  my  first  trip  here.

I  really  hope  this  is  not  my  last  trip  either.

A  very  happy  new  year  to  all  of  you  from  this  beautiful  city  of  Valencia  in  Spain.  The  land  of  Picasso,  Paella,  Ponchos  and  so  much more.

Feliz  Ano…  As  they  say  in  Spain.

untitled-62

Til Chikki: Sesame seed brittle

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-10

Like  every  year  the  ‘Cookie  exchange’  sign  went  up  on  our  office  notice  board.  Like  every  year  I  started  contemplating  should  I  sign  up  or  not.  I  counted  the  names  already  on,  a  total  of  twelve.  One  dozen.  I  needed  to  bake  one  hundred  and  forty  four  pieces  of  treats  at  least..

untitled-12

I  hummed  and  hawed.  Where  was  the  time,  my  ‘to  do’  list  was  long  and  growing  longer  at  a  rapid  rate,  the  deadline  was  looming.  The  adventurer  in  me  won  in  the  end.

Next  it  was  time  to  decide  what  were  the  treats  going  to  be.  Consultation  from  cookbooks  and  online  sites  resulted  in  a  short  list  of  items.  As  always  my  criteria  were,  fast  and  easy  to  make,  won’t  break  the  bank  and   should  not  be  guilt  laden…

untitled-5

Sesame  seeds  brittle  was  my  choice.  Easy  to  prepare,  few  ingredients,  stores  well,  gluten  free,  is  said  to  keep  the  body  warm  in  cold  days.

untitled-6

Try  this  out  friends,  you  won’t  be  disappointed.

Have  a  great  holiday  season.

Recipe:  

Made  30-35  pieces  about  11/2  cms  long.

Ingredients;

Sesame  seeds                                               1  cup

Sugar                                                               1  cup

Vanilla  extract                                                 1/4  tsp

Ghee                                                                2  Tbsp

Method;

Grease  a  chopping  board,  rolling  pin  and  a  pizza  cutter.

Put  the  sesame  seeds  in  a  heavy  bottomed  pan  and  dry  roast  them  over  medium  heat,  till  they  become  very  slightly  brown  and  you  get  a  nutty  aroma,  about  6  minutes.  Collect  them  in  a  bowl.

In  the  same  pan  add  the  ghee,  as  soon  as  it  melts  add  the  sugar.  Keep  the  heat  on  medium  and  make  sure  you  keep  stirring.  Let  the  sugar  melt  about  10  minutes.  The  colour  will  now  have  changed.  Put  the  gas  off.

Add  the  roasted  sesame  seeds  and  vanilla.  Work  fast  and  mix  well.  Transfer  this  to  the  greased  surface.  Use  the  rolling  pin  and  extend  it  to  an  approximately  rectangular  shape.  Use  the  Pizza  cutter  to  mark  the  cuts,  either  into  rectangular  or  diamond  shape.  Wait  until  this  cools  down,  about  5  minutes.  break  them  in  pieces.

Store  them  in  an  airtight  container.  It stays  well  for  a  month.

Inside  Scoop;

The  sugar  syrup  is  very  hot.  Handle  with  extreme  care.

Put  the  gas  off  as  soon  as  the  sugar  melts,  any  further  and  the  sugar  will  burn  making  the  brittles  bitter.

 

 

 

Gobi Roast: Roasted Cauliflower, GF

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-3

I  always  struggle  with  the  side  dish.  The  main  dish  is  easy  to  pick,  the  carb  follows  the  main  dish,  dessert  is  good  with  whatever  you  choose.  That  leaves  us  with  a  side.  What  is  that  going  to  be.

While  growing  up  it  would  be  easy,  whatever  was  available  in  the  season.  Eggplant,  Okra  in  the  summer.  Cauliflower,  Turnip  and  other  root  vegetables  in    winter.  Hawkers  would  sell  door  to  door.  The  wooden  cart  neatly  arranged,  they  would  call  out  their  wares.  There  would  be  others  who  would  tinkle  their  bells.  They  all  came  by  at  a  fixed  time.  I  remember  at  times  anxiously  waiting  for  the  familiar  call.  Its  something  like  the  ice  cream  truck’s  music  here  in  the  west.

untitledThings  have  changed  since.  The  season  is  not  a  hindrance  anymore.  Thanks  to  modren  technology,  produce  from  Peru  or  Ecuador  can  be  at  our  doorstep  in  no  time.  We  are  spoilt  with  choices.  Eggplant  and  Cauliflower  could  be  rubbing  shoulders  in  my  refrigerator.

untitled-2

Coming  back  to  the  recipe,  I  love  when  part  of  the  dish  can  be  finished  in  the  oven.  That  seems  to  free  up  valuable  time.  The  beauty  of  this  recipe  is  you  can  crank  up  the  spices  or  go  for  a  ‘less  fiery’  option.

Friends  do  you  have  hard  time  deciding  the  side  dish?  I’d  love  to  hear  from  you.  Please  leave  me  a  comment..

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Cauliflower                                                         1  large

Onion                                                                  1/2  cup  chopped

Garlic                                                                  3  cloves

Ginger                                                                  1/2  inch

Tomatoes                                                            2  small

Canola  oil                                                           4  Tbsps

Salt                                                                      To  taste

Coriander  powder                                                1  tsp

Cumin  powder                                                       1  tsp

Turmeric  powder                                                    1/2  tsp

Cilantro                                                                   1/2  cup  chopped

Bay  leaf                                                                  1

Cardamom  pods                                                   2-3,  crushed

Green  chilli                                                             2  (  optional  )

Method:

Pre  heat  oven  to  350  F

Wash  the  cauliflower,  leave  it  whole  or  divide  it  in  two.  Sprinkle  salt  and  turmeric,  keep  aside.

Put  the  onion,  garlic,  ginger,  tomatoes  and  chilli  if  using,  in  a  blender  and  make  a  fine  paste.

Take  a  deep  bottom  pan  with  a  Tbsp  oil  on  high  heat.  Put  the  bay  leaf  and  cardamom  pods  in  it,  as  soon  as  the  pods  crackle  add  the  cauliflower.  Fry  for  a  minute  or  two  until  it  gets  a  light  brown  colour.  Take  it  out  of  the  pan.

Add  2  Tbsps  oil  in  the  same  pan  and  add  the  onion  paste.  Throw  in  the  cumin,  coriander  powder.  Check  the  salt,  add  more  if  needed  now.  Saute  the  Masala  or  spice  paste  on  medium  heat  until  the  oil  separates  from  the  mixture,  about  8-9  minutes.  Put  the  gas  off.  Smear  this  mixture  all  over  the  cauliflower.

Take  an  oven  safe  vessel  and  add  1  Tbsp  oil.  Seat  the  cauliflower  in  it.  Cover  and  bake  for  30  minutes.

Garnish  with  cilantro  and  serve  hot.

Inside  Scoop;

Please  do  not  get  put  off  by  the  long  list  of  ingredients.  A  small  collection  of  these  spices  in  your  pantry  can  come  handy  in  many  Indian  recipes.

While  frying  the  spice  mixture,  keep  stirring  so  it  doesn’t  stick  to  the  bottom  of  the  pan.

Kaju Katli: Cashew fudge, GF, DF

Image

By  Ratna,

untitled-4

I  just  read  this  article  in  Saveur  “15  Indian  desserts  that  give  you  a  tour  of  the  country “.  Indian  sweets  are  anything  but  boring.  I  totally  agree  with  the  editors.  The  sweets  can  be  dry  or  dripping  with  syrup,  milk  or  flour  based,  a  vegetable  or  fruit  can  be  the  star  ingredient,  most  of  them  are  even  eggless,  respecting  the  vegetarians.

untitled-3

Did  you  know  that  sweets  can  be  coated  by  gold  or  silver  leaf?  If  you  have  come  across  some  pictures  of  Indian  movies  or  festivals,  I  bet  you  have  noticed  that  we  like  the  “Bling”.  This  affinity  is  so  strong  that  we  even  like  our  food “Blinged”?  Yup.  You  heard  that  right.

untitled-5

Festivals  are  incomplete  without  dessert.  Coating  the  desserts  with  a  silver  leaf  also  known  as  “Vark”,  is  quite  common.  This  is  what  I  tried  for  Diwali  this  year.  Cashew  fudges  covered  with  edible  silver  foil.  Kept  in  an  airtight  container  it  will  safely  store  for  two  weeks.  Make  ahead  recipes  always  come  handy  wouldn’t  you  agree?

untitled-2

Recipe:    Adapted from In house recipes.

Made  about  30-35  pieces.

Ingedients;

Raw,  unsalted  Cashews                                       2  cups ground  fine

Sugar                                                                     1  cup

Water                                                                      1/3  cup

Cardamom  powder                                                 1/2  tsp

Vark   (  optional  )                                                   Two  sheets,  about  6  cms  squared

Method;

Take  the  sugar,  water  and  cardamom  powder  in  a  nonstick  pan  on  high  heat,  till  it  comes  to  a  boil.  Crank  the  heat  down  to  medium  and  let  the  syrup  thicken,  about  3  minutes.  Turn  the  gas  down  to  low  now.  Add  the  cashew  powder.  Keep  stirring  so  that  it  is  lump  free,  doesn’t  stick  to  the  bottom  of  the  pan  and  start  leaving  the  sides  of  the  pan,  about  3  minutes.  Turn  the  gas  off.

Pour  this  mixture  on  a  greased  wax  paper.  Take  another  greased  wax  paper  and  put  it  on  top  of  the  mixture.  Put  the  palm  of  your  hand  on  the  second  wax  paper  and  flatten  it.  Gently  use  a  rolling  pin  to  spread  it  out,  preferably  to  a    square  shape  about  1/3  rd  centimetre  thick.  Remove  the  top  wax  sheet.  Take  a  Pizza  cutter  or  sharp  knife  and  cut  it  in  diamond  shape.

Carry  the  “Vark”  on  the  paper  it  came  with  and  drop  it  gently  on  this  spread.  Press  the  “Vark”  softly  on  to  this  mixture  to  help  stick.  Take  a  sharp  knife  and  gently  run  the  cuts  over  the  Vark  again.  Tease  out  the  pieces  and  enjoy.

Inside  scoop;

Vark  or  edible  silver  foil  is  available  through  Amazon.com.

You  can  cover  all  the  pieces  with  the  Vark, I  have  used  for  a  few  only.

 

Sabudana kheer: Tapioca pearls and coconut milk pudding with Raspberry syrup. DF

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-3

untitled-6We  had  snow  twice  already.  It  didn’t  stay  though.  The  garden  is  now  full  of  yellow  leaves  some  naked  branches,  an  errant  flower  in  a  corner  in  between  a  bunch  of  dead  stems.  The  raspberry  patch  is  a  different  story  altogether.  These  autumn  raspberries  are  flourishing  everyday  like  rebels. The  fruit  heavy  branches  bowed  downwards,   swaying  sideways  with  gentle  wind…

untitled-7

Navaratri  or  nine  nights  is  celebrating  the  feminine  form  of  the  divine.  Devotees  partake  food  with  no  grains  for  each  of  these  nine  days.  Sabudana  which  is  granules  made  from  Tapioca  root  is  an  acceptable  form  of  nutrition.

untitled-3

I  was  looking  for  ways  to  use  up  my  raspberries.  I  made  a  syrup  from  them  and  layered  this  with  the  Sabudana  pudding.  A  nice  garnish  on  top,  and  voilla,  we  had  fusion  dessert  here.

untitled-4untitled-5

Recipe:  

Serves  6.

Ingredients:

Sabudana ( Tapioca  pearls ),  washed  with  water                                    1/3 cup

Coconut  milk  ( Can  from  Aroy  D  )                                                           2  cups

Cardamom  powder                                                                                    1/2  tsp

Raspberries  washed                                                                                   2 1/4  cups

Sugar                                                                                                          1/3  &  2/3  cup

Cornstarch                                                                                                  2  Tbsps

Water                                                                                                          1/2  cup

Coconut  slivers                                                                                           few  to  garnish

Method;

Mix  the  cornstarch  and  water  into  a  lump  free  slurry.  Put  the  raspberries  in  a  blender  and  make  a  puree.  Take  this  puree,  cornstarch  mixture  and  1/3  rd  cup  sugar  in  a  pan  over  medium  heat.  Make  it  into  a  thick  sauce,  about  5  minutes.  Put  the  gas  off.

Boil  the  Sabudana  with  half  cup  water  on  a  medium  flame  till  soft,  about  7  minutes.  Add  the  coconut  milk,  Cardamom  powder  and  2/3  cup  sugar.  Simmer  on  low  medium  flame  for  about  20  minutes,  stirring  sometimes.  The  Sabudana  will  turn  translucent,  some  will  blend  in  the  milk,  thickening  it.  Turn  the  gas  off.

You  can  serve  it  hot.  I  assembled  it  in  layers.  Garnish  with  a  few  whole  Raspberries  and  Coconut  slivers.

Inside  Scoop;

Sabudana  can  be  purchased  from  Indian  grocery  store.

The  botanical  name  for  Tapioca  is  Manihot  Esculenta  Crantz  syn.  Utilissima.

Subzi wale makki roti: Vegetables and cornflour flatbread. GF

Image

By  Ratna

untitled-3

October  12th  was   Pitri  Paksha,  which  translates  to  The  fortnight  of  the  Ancestors.  This  new  moon  day  we  show  gratitude  to  our  ancestors.  Not  only  do  we  owe  our  existence  to  them,  it  is  due  to  their  contribution  that  we  enjoy  everything  else  in  this  world.  We  are  ourselves  because  of  the  gifts  that  we  have  received  from  them.  If  we  broaden  the  definition  of  the  term  ancestors,  from  our  parents  or  grandparents  to  the  whole  humanity,  then  we  have  even  more  reason  to  be  thankful.  The  clothes  we  wear,  the  food  we  enjoy,  the  technology  we  use,  the  way  we  entertain  ourselves,  have  all  come  down  from  ‘the  ancestors.’  It  is  only  natural  that  we  sometimes  pause  in  our  life,  bow  our  heads  in  gratitude  and  pay  our  debts  to  them

untitled

The  ritual  involves  offering  water  to  their  soul.  The  fresh  harvest,  a  symbolic  gesture  for  food,  is  also  offered.

We  celebrated  Thanksgiving  in  Canada  on  the  12th.  It  is  a  day  we  thank  the  almighty  God  for  the  bountiful  harvest  with  which  we  have  been  blessed.  Families  get  together  for  sumptuous  feasts,  parades  are  held  and  pumpkin  pies  are  baked  to  celebrate  the  day.

Two  faraway  countries,  India  and  Canada,  but  similar  traditions.

untitled-2

I  had  carrots  and  beets  freshly  harvested  from  the  garden.  Instead  of  pies  I  worked  them  into  flatbreads.  With  crunchy  radishes  or  smooth  yoghurt  and  some  fierce  pickles  for  a  side,  it  made  an  excellent  brunch  menu.

Recipe:  From  my  friend  Parul.

Made  4  pieces.

Ingredients;

Grated  carrots                                                 1/4 th cup

Grated  beets                                                    1/4 th cup

Grated  Cauliflower                                            1/4 th  cup

Corn  flour  ( see  notes )                                    1  cup

Cream                                                               1/2  cup

Salt                                                                    To  taste

Pepper                                                              To  taste

Method.

Mix  all  the  dry  ingredients  together  in  a  bowl.  Pour  the  cream  to  make  it  into  a  soft  dough.  Divide  them  into  four  equal  parts  to  form  lemon  size  balls.  Line  the  countertop  with  a  piece  of  wax  paper.  Roll  the  ball  gently  in  a  circle,  3  inches  diameter  circle.  Take  care,  for  the  absence  of  gluten  makes  it  hard to  bind.

With  the  help  of  a  flat  spatula  transfer  this  on  to  a  greased  heated  frying  pan  on  medium  heat.  After  about  a  minute,  gently  flip  it  over.  Put  a  teaspoon  of  oil  on  it.  Gently  press  the  surface  with  the spatula  and  rotate  the  bread  on  the  pan.  Repeat  the  same  with  the  other  side  until  lightly  crispy,  about  8  minutes  total.

Serve  hot  with  a  dollop  of  butter on  top,

Inside  Scoop;

While  rolling  the  dough,  run  the  pin  to  one  side  ( say  north ),  lift  the  pin,  bring  it  to  the  middle,  now  roll  it  to  the  other  side  ( say  south ).  Rotate  the  wax  paper  and  repeat  the  above  procedure.

If  you  see  the  sides  are  not  as  smooth,  tuck  them  in  with  wet  finger.

Traditionally  it  is  served  with  Saag  (  leafy  greens  ).  However  potato  or  any  other  curry  goes  well  too.

It  could  be  done  just  plain  without  any  veggies  too.

I  have  used  this  brand  of  cornflour  “Punjabi  Makki de  Atta  PTI”.

I  have  referred  to  Wikipedia  and  Isha  foundation  blog  for  the  details  on  Pitri  paksha.