Punjeeri Laddus: Rejuvenating dumplings for new mums

Image

By  Ratna

Punjeeri laddu-5

Smita  picked  up  the  parcel  that  was  left  at  her  doorstep  by   Canada  Post.  It  was  more  bulky  than  heavy.  Standing  on  the  snow  covered  steps,  she  visualized  a  beautiful,  pleasant,  sunny  day.  Her  mother  sitting  on  the  low  stool  carefully  measuring  each  ingredient,  first  running  her  fingers  swiftly  through  the  nuts  or  seeds,  discarding  the  husks,  washing,  grinding,  and  finally  assembling  the  Laddus.  Smita  knew  that  more  than  any  other  ingredient  it  was  a  generous  amount  of  love  that  was  binding  the  Laddus.

A  little  kick  inside  her  brought  her  back  to  the  present.  If  only  she  could  travel  that  fast,  she  thought.   Two  oceans  separated  her  and   her  mother,  half  way  across the  world.   Smita  pushed  the  door  with  her  back  and  stepped  inside.  The  last  few  months  had  changed  her  body  such  that   she  needed  extra  room  to  move  around.  A  new  life  was  growing inside  her.

Punjeeri laddu-4

Being  a  registered  nurse  herself  she  thought  she  had  experienced  it  all.  Far  from the  truth.  Everyday  she  marvelled  at  how  the  little  bump  inside  her  was  evolving.  From seemingly  nothing  it  took  shape. “The  little  extensions  were  for  arms  and  legs”,  her  doctor  had  showed   her  on  the  fuzzy  black  and  white  ultrasound  picture.  She  even  let  her  listen  to  the  baby’s  heartbeat…

…”The  saunf,  ajwain  will  help  in  digestion,  the  Punjeeri  will  help  in  lactation and  gaining  your  strength  back”  her  mother  reminded  her  over  Skype  the  other  day.  Excitedly  telling  her  how  to  bathe  and  massage  her  new  grand  baby.  Holding  the  bundle  of  joy  close  to  her  heart  Smita  was  convinced  that  it  was  nothing  less than  a  miracle.  A  tiny  human  complete  with  eyebrows  above  the  eyes  and  nails  at  the  end  of  the  little  fingers.  After  becoming  a  mum  herself  she  realized  no  amount  of  reading  or  working  in  the  same  field  could  prepare  her  for  this  experience.  As  she  bit  into  the  Punjeeri  Laddu  that  her  mum  had  sent  her  all  the  way  from  India,  she  suddenly  remembered  her  Anatomy  teacher.  “Any  time  you  have  a  tiff  with  your  mother”,  he  had  said,  “bow  down,  look  at  your  belly  button  and  remember  your  debt  to  her”.

Recipe:   Made  20  pieces

Ingredients;

Whole  wheat  flour                                         One  cup

Almonds  coarsely  chopped                          Three  quarter  cup

Melon  seeds,  washed                                   One  quarter  cup

Fox  nuts  (  Makhana  )                                    Half  cup  cut  in  pieces

Pistachios                                                      One  Quarter  cup  chopped

Ghee                                                                Three  quarter  cup

Edible  gum  (  Gaund  )                                    Half  cup  broken  in  pieces

Sugar                                                               One  and  quarter  cup

Carom  seeds  (  Ajwain  )                              One  tsp crushed

Dried  ginger  powder  ( Sonth )                        One  tsp

Fennel  powder  ( Saunf )                                  One  tsp

Cardamom  powder                                          One  tsp

Water                                                                 Half  cup

Method:

Dry  roast  the  melon  seeds  for  a  minute  till  it  popped.  Collect  them  in  a  container  and  keep  aside.

Take  one  Tbsp  of  ghee  in  the  same  wok  and  fry  the  Makhana  for  a  few  minutes  till  crunchy.  Keep  it  aside. Take  another  two  Tbsp  of  ghee  and  add  the  Gaund,  fry  for  a  few  minutes.  Look  for  changes  in  colour  and  increase  in  volume.  Collect  them  in  a  bowl.

Take  the  rest  of  the  ghee  and  add  the  flour.  Roast  it  for  four  to  five  minutes  stirring  constantly.  To  this  add  the  almonds,  pistachios,  ajwain,  sonth,  fennel  seed  powder,  cardamom  powder,  Gaund,  melon  seeds  and  Makhana  and  mix  well.

In  a  separate  bowl  take  half  cup  of  water,   add  three  quarter  cup  of  sugar  and  bring  it  to  a  boil.  Let  it  reach  220  degrees  centigrade.  Use  a  candy  thermometer.  Pour  this  syrup  over  the  flour  mixture.  Switch  the  gas  off.  Mould  into  golf  ball  size  dumplings  while  still  warm.

Enjoy  with  a  glass  of  milk.

Gluten  free  version;

Substitute  one  cup  grated  coconut  in  place  of  whole  wheat  flour  and  follow  the  same  recipe.

Inside  Scoop:

Melon  seeds  known  as  Charmagaz,  Foxnuts  known  as  Phool  makhana,  Edible  gum  also  known  as  Gaund  are  available  in  Indian  grocery  store.

Each  family  will  usually  have  their  own  recipes.  I  have  followed  the  recipe  from  Manjula’s  kitchen  with  very  minor  changes.

I  had  used  the  Gluten  free  Sunblest  Organic  Coconut  flour  from  Costco.  I felt  a  couple  more  Tbsps  of  ghee  would’ve  made  the  gluten  free  Laddus  more  moist.

 

 

 

 

Barley and vegetable soup

Image

By Ratna

Barley and vegetable soup-4

It  was  one  of  those  days when  I  was  spending  a  bit  of  time  ( read  all  my  time ),  gawking  at  the  delicious  photographs  on  Foodgawker.  This  one  picture  caught  my  eye  just  because of  its simplicity.  Few  ingredients,  few  steps  and  a  soul  warming  result. With  the  weather the  way  it  is , It  didn’t  take  me  long   to  decide  on  the  menu  for  supper.

The  temperature  outside  plummeted  from  three  below  to  thirty  below  zero  celsius in  a  matter  of  a  day.  The  migratory  birds  did  not  need  the  report  from  the Meterologists,  they  left  for  the  warmer  climates  just  in  time.  The  lakes  are  frozen solid.  The  evergreens  are  bowed  with  the  weight  of  the  snow  on  them.  The  branches  of  the  deciduous  trees   look  highlighted  with  the  snow  on  them.  The furnitures  on  the  deck  covered  with  half  feet  of  snow  only  reminding  us  that summer  is  only  a  dream  now.  The  sun  so  strong   yet  powerless  to  melt  the  snow.

Barley and vegetable soup-5

I  have  tweaked  the  recipe  a  little  bit,  added  a  bit  of  heat  and  countered  it  with  a  couple  squirts  of  lemon  juice  and  apple  puree.

Recipe;

Ingredients;

Barley                                                             One cup

Mushrooms                                                    Half cup chopped

Carrots                                                           Half cup,  cut  in  small  cubes

Apple                                                             One,  pureed

Cauliflower                                                     Half cup,  in  small  florets

Kaffir lime  juice                                              Half  tsp

Red  chillies                                                    Optional,  Few  flakes

Salt  and  Pepper                                            To  taste

Ghee                                                               One  Tbsp

Bay  leaf                                                          Couple

Peppercorns                                                    Six  or  seven

Lime leaves                                                      Optional,  a  couple.

 

Method;

Take  a  Tbsp  of  ghee  in  a  pan  on  high  heat.  When  it  melts  add  the  Bay leaf  and  peppercorns.  Saute  for  a  few  minutes.  Add  the  carrots  first  then  cauliflowers.  Cook  for  a  few  minutes  till  the  florets  get  some  colour.  Add  the  mushrooms  last.  Add  two  cups  of  water,  cover  and  cook  till  the  vegetables  are  done.  Throw  in  the  apple  puree.

Boil  the  barley  with  two  cups  of  water  till  done.

Add  the  vegetables,  salt,  pepper  to  the  boiled  barley.  Throw  in  the Kaffir  lime  leaves  for  flavour.  Garnish  with  green  or  red  chillies  and cilantro.

Chirer Polau : Beaten Rice Pilaf

Image

By  Ratna

chirer polau-2

Both  of  our  eyes  were  fixed  on  the  measuring  bowl.  Eak,  Doh,  Teen  she  counted  out  loud  making  sure  there  was  no  room  for  error  either  in  her  count  or  the  way   the  Chire  was  packed  in  the  grapefruit  sized  round  silver  bowl.  There  were  no  pre  packed  options  or  any  balance  to  weigh  the  amount.  Each  bowl  was  supposed  to  be  the  equivalent  of  a  Powa  ( 250 gms  approx ).  After  the  desired  amount  was  measured   it  was  customary  to  ask  for  Fau  ( extra )  to  make  up  for  any  unforseen  error  that  could’ve  escaped   even  the  watchful  of  eyes.  After  all  the  silver  bowl  with  a  couple  dents  on  its  side  had  seen  better  days.  Mahatoin   sat  hunched  on  the  floor, the  heavy   silver  armlets,  necklace  and  earring  on  her  ebony  colour  skin  was  as  if  out  of  a  Sepia  print.  The  transaction  done,  it  was  time  to  exchange  some  pleasantaries.   She  adjusted  the  end  of  her  sari  and  checked  on  the  suckling  baby  attached  to  her  body.  We  discuss   about  how  the  crops  turned  out  or  what  the  city  life  was  like.

The  Chire  was  wrapped  in  a  big  piece  of  cloth  with  a  secure  knot.  This  was  then  seated  in  a  large  wicker  basket.  Another  long  piece  of  fabric  was  folded  on  itself  to  act  as  a  padding.  Mahatoin  seated  the  padding  on  her  head.  Her  fingers  then  ran  on  the  knot  behind  her  neck,  making  sure  the  cloth   holding  the  baby  was  secure.  Satisfied  with  the  ”  systems  check”  so  far,  she  now  bends  to  lift  the  big  basket  on  her  head.  Her  left  leg  makes  a  small  move  as  she  balances  herself.  The  baby  with  a  full  tummy  now  fast  asleep.  Mahatoin  flashes  a  big  smile  and  bids  farewell  to me  as  she  gets  ready  to  continue  with  her  hawking.  Life  was  that  simple.

chirer polau

I  had  moved  out  of  home  by  then  to  the  university,  and  was  back  only  for  holidays.  Ma  would  try  to  fit  in  as  many  delicacies  as  she  possibly  could  within  that  limited  time.  Chirer  Polau  used  to  be  our  snack  for  the  afternoon.   There  could  be  nothing  fresher  than  the  beaten  rice  Mahatoin  brought  to  our  door.  Made  from  the  latest  harvest  with  no  additives  or  modifications,  genetic  or  otherwise.  Beaten  rice  being  lighter  than  regular  rice   was  thought  to  be  the  right  choice  for  an  afternoon  snack.  This  Polau  was  cooked  with  a  variety  of  spices,  nuts,  a  few  choice  veggies  tipping  the  final  taste  to  the  sweet  side.

chirer polau fg-2

 

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Beaten  rice                            Two  cups

Cauliflower                              Half  cup  cut  in  small  florets

Potato                                    Half  cup  cut  in  small  cubes

Cashew  nuts                         One  Tbsp

Raisins                                   One  Tbsp

Bay  leaf                                   Couple

Cloves                                    two

Cumin  seeds                       Half  tsp

Dried  red  chilli                     One

Cinnamon  stick                   Two  inches  long  broken  in  pieces

Ginger                                 One  inch  long  grated

Salt                                     To  taste

Sugar                                 Two  tsps

Frozen  peas                      Half  cup

Saffron                               Few  strands

Canola oil                           One  Tbsp

Ghee                                 Two  Tbsps

Milk                                   One  tsp

Method.

Gently  wash  the  beaten  rice  only  once  and  spread  it  out  on  kitchen  towel  to  dry.

Take  the  milk  in  a  small  bowl  and  warm  it  in  the  microwave,  soak  the  saffron  strands  in  it  and  keep  it  aside.

Heat  about  a  tsp  of  Canola  oil  in  a  non  stick  pan  and  throw  in  the  cumin  seeds  and  red  chilli  in  it.  As  soon  as  the  cumin  seeds  get  a  bit  of  colour  throw  in  the  cut  potato  pieces  a  pinch  of  salt  and  cook  covered.  Put  the  gas  off  as  soon  as  the  potatoes  are  done  and  has  some  colour.  Collect  them  in  a  bowl.

Heat  another  tsp  of  oil  in  the  same  pan  and  this  time  fry  the  cauliflower  pieces  covered  with  a  pinch  of  salt  until  done.  Collect  them  in  a  bowl.

Now  add  the  ghee  in  the  pan  and  let  it  heat  up.  Throw  in  the  bay  leaf  first,  cinnamon  stick,  cloves,  cardamom,  grated  ginger,  cashew  nuts  and  raisins.  Fry  for  a  few  minutes  till  the  raisins  plump  up,  add  the  beaten  rice,  salt  and  sugar.  Be  very  gentle  in  stirring  only  to  assemble  things  together.  Add  the  frozen  peas  last.  Pour  the  saffron  soaked  milk  over  the  Polau.

The  final  taste  tends  to  be  a  bit  sweet.  Enjoy  while  it  is  still  hot.

Inside  scoop:

Chire  is   Beaten  rice  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.  It  is  also  known  as  Poha.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kalakand: Milk Cake

Image

By  Ratna

kalakand

We  didn’t  say  “trick  or  treat”  or  dress up  in  scary  costume.  The  days  after  Durga  Pujo  were  for  visiting  all  our  neighbours  and  showing  them  Pranam  ( respect ).  Just  doing  that  would  mean  we  would  be  treated  with  delicious  snacks  or  dessert  or  even  a  full  meal.  It  was  not  just  an  evening  either.  You  had  about  a  whole  week  for  that.  It  was  no  surprise  that  we  played  our  cards  right.  We  would  sit  down  with  our  friends  to  make  a  fool  proof  plan.  We  divided  the  neighbourhood  houses  into  different  zones.  A  couple  in  the  morning  a  couple  in  the  evening.  Any  ‘insider  information’  on  the  nature  of  snack  offered  in  a  particular  house  could  alter  our  plan  accordingly.  How  I  remember  those  fun  filled  days…

kalakand-2

Durga  Puja  is  celebrated  in  India   around  September  or  October.  Godess  Durga  is  Shakti  ( power).  She  emerges  victorious  after  her  fights  with  the  demon  Mahishashur.  Now  that  is  a  reason  to  celebrate.  The  festivities  goes  on  for  nine  days.  New  clothes,  no  studies,  fasting  and  feasting  are  the  hallmark  of  Durgapujo.  Even  the  weather  cooperates  with  mild  temperatures  making  it  a  magical  time  of the year.

Nobody  made  sweets  like  Bowneer  Thakuma  (  Bownee’s  Granma ).  Be  it   one   dunked  in  syrup  or  just  dry  Barfi   (  fudge  ).  Her  house  was  on  our  ‘priority  list.’  Oma  dekhi  kawto  bawro  holi,  O  my  look  how  much  you’ve  grown,  she  said  adjusting  the  end  of  her  sari  which  had  a  bunch  of  keys  tied  to  it.  Always  in  crisp  white  sari  with  no  border  she  savoured  the  moments  as  she  watched  us  savour  her  sweets.  Too  young  to  worry  about   why  she  wore  only  crisp  white,  we  licked  our  plates  clean.  It  was much  later  that  I  found  out  that  it  was  the  societies  requirement  that  she  be  dressed  in  a  particular  way  or  change  her  eating  habits  just  because  her  husband  was  no  more.  How  this  cruel  societal  bias   could  never  take  away  the  smile  from  her  crinkly  face,  the  love  to  go  through  the  elaborate  cooking  to  see  others  happy,  amazed  me.

Kalakand  or  milk  fudge is  usually  done  from whole  milk  in  India.  It  usually  takes  hours  over  slow  flame  to  get  it  right.  Thanks  to  Ricotta  cheese,  making  Kalakand  can  be  a  breeze  now.

kalakand-3

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Ricotta  cheese                         Saputo  light  500gm  tub.

Condensed  milk                       Eagle  brand  300  ml  tin.

Pistachio  nuts                           Handful  Chopped.

Cardamom  powder                  One  eighth  tsp

Method;

Empty  the  cheese  in  a cheese  cloth  and  let  it drain for  about  half  hour.  Now  mix  this  cheese  and  condensed  milk  in  a  microwave  safe  deep  bowl.  Cover  and  cook  for  5  minutes  on  high.  Stir  and  let  it  sit  for  two minutes.  Repeat  the  process  again   for  5  minutes. Stir  and  let  it  sit  for  two  minutes.  This  time  cook  for  one  minute  intervals,  stirring  in  between  for  a  total  10  minutes.  Add  the  cardamom  powder.  Mix  well.

Transfer  this  to  a  greased  square  pan.  Make  square  cuts  so  that  the  pieces  are  about  an  inch  square. Refrigerate  for  half  hour.  Garnish  with  chopped  pistachio  nuts  and  serve.

Inside  Scoop

The  aim  of  the  above  procedure  is  to  achieve  a  soft  dough.  The  time  of  cooking  can  be  used  as  a  guide,  depending  on  the  humidity,  brand  of  cheese,  it  may  need  to  be  tweaked  a  bit.

The  mixture  tends  to  sputter,  so  cover  it  with  a  microwave  cover  with  vents.

The  final  result  is  a  granular  texture  as  shown  in  the  picture,  not  creamy  and  smooth.

Traditionally  Kalakand  is  not  too  sweet.  It  is  ok  to  play  with   the   amount  of  condensed  milk  in  the  recipe.

I  wouldn’t   slack  on  stirring  as  it  prevents  the  milk  solids  from  sticking  to  the  pan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bhejitabil Chawp : Spicy Vegetable Croquet.

By  Ratna

bhejitabil chop blog-4

The  train  came  to  a  sudden  halt,  waking  me  up. Rubbing  my  eyes  I  look  out  of  the  window  to  figure  out  where  we  were.  A  smallish  station  with  busy  vendors. Steaming  cups  of  tea,  pre packed  snacks  exchanging  hands.  A  fruit  seller  with  bananas  and  oranges  at  a  distance,  a  thick  scarf  covering  his  ears  and  head.

.bhejitabil chop blog-2

We  were  making  the  four  hour  train  journey  from  Howrah  to  Tatanagar  in  India. With  the  schools  closed  for  December  holidays  there  were  lots  of  families  with  young  children  travelling.  The  fleeting  landscape  outside  was  different  shades  of  green.  Green  grass,  green  trees  with  climbers  wrapped  around,  green  fields,  even  the  lakes  and  ponds  which  were  so  abundant  had  green  plants  covering  the  surface.

beetrootblog

A  steady  stream  of  hawkers  made  their  rounds.  Newspapers,  magazines  with  special  deals,  incense  sticks  with  promises  of  one  of  a  kind  fragrance.  Mobile  shoe  shine,  a  blind  man  with  outstretched  arm  seeking  pennies,  his  melodious  voice  reminding  us  how  good  deeds  in  life  are  always  paid  back  tenfold  by  the  almighty.  His  other  arm  resting  on  the  shoulder  of  a  barefooted  little  girl .The  song  definitely  had  an  impact  for  I  heard  the  clinking  of  the  coins  against  his  tin  can.

The  train  had  left  the  station  and  was  slowly  moving out.  A  spicy  aroma  was  followed  by  a  skinny  man  with  a  big  wicker  basket  hanging  around  his  neck.  A  red  cloth  covered  the  snacks,  with  an  assortment  of  small  tin  containers  neatly  arranged  around  the  periphery  of  the  basket.  It  was  hard  not  to  give  in. The  family  sitting  right  across,  enquired  the  price.  There  was  a  brief  conversation  accusing  the  vendor  of  his  cut  throat  prices .  The  vegetable  prices  had  skyrocketed  he  mumbled  in  his  defence.  The  deal  did  go  through  with   my  fellow  passengers  carefully  balancing  the  ‘Chawps’  on  a  bowl  made  from  dried  leaves.

bhejitabil chop blog-6

We  were  not  allowed  food  from  these  vendors  with  questionable  hygiene.   Looking  away  was  not  helping  as  the  overwhelming  aroma  and  the  sound  of  crunchy  onions  or  peanuts  was  causing  my  mouth  to  water. I  still  made  a  feeble  attempt  and  looked at  Baba.  He  nodded  his  head  to  reinforce  what  I  already  knew.  Ma however  promised  that  she  would  make  it  for  us  when  we  reached  home.  And  she  did !  With  a  hot  cup  of  tea  these ‘ vegetable  chawps’,  are  to  die  for.  With  the  abundance  of  root  vegetables  during  the  winter  months  this  snack  was  a  regular  in  our  house.

It  is  not  winter  here  in  the  Prairies  yet.  September  brought  some  snow  though,  would  you  believe?  It  didn’t last,  but  prompted  me  to  get  my  hand  shaping  these  ‘Chawps’

bhejitabil chop blogbhejitabil chop blog-7

What  are  your  favourite  snacks  while  travelling.  I’d  love  to  hear  from you.  Do  drop me  a  line.

Recipe;

Ingredients;

Beetroots                                                Two  large.

Carrots                                                    Two

Potatoes                                                  Two

Peanuts                                                   One  Tbsp

Raisins                                                     One  Tbsp

Ginger                                                      One  inch  grated.

All  purpose  flour                                    Two  Tbsp

Breadcrumbs                                           One  packet.  I  used  Panko.

Canola  oil                                               Two  cups  for  frying.

Onion                                                      One  cut  in  thin  julienne.

Salt                                                         To  taste

Spices,

Cumin  seeds                                   One  and  half  tsp

Fennel  seeds                                   One  and  half  tsp

Red  chilli  powder                            One  tsp

 

Method;

Put  the  potatoes  and  beetroots  in  a  pressure  cooker  skin  on,  wait  for  two  whistles,  turn  the  gas  off.  Let  it  cool  down.  Skin  the  vegetables.  Mash  the  potatoes, grate  the  beetroots.  Skin  the  raw  carrots  and  grate  them.  Keep  them  aside.

Dry  roast  the ones  listed  under  Spices,  grind  and  set  aside.

Take  a  pan  with  one  Tbsp  of  canola  oil  on  high  heat  and  throw  the  peanuts  in.  Fry  for  a  few  minutes  till  they  get  some  colour  then  add  the  raisins.  Add  the  vegetables  soon  after.  Bring  the  heat  to medium  now.  Saute  for  a  few  minutes,  add  the  ground  spices  and  salt.  It  is  done  when  the  mixture  is  all  dry  or  all  the  moisture  is  gone.  Put  the  gas  off  and  let  it  cool  down.

Make  a  slurry  with  the  flour  and  water.  Spread  the  breadcrumbs  on  a  newspaper  sheet. Take  a  handful  of  the  above  mixture  and  form  an  inch  and  half   cylinder  with  your  hand.  Dip  these  first  in  the  flour  slurry  then  in  the  breadcrumbs  so  they  are  coated  evenly.  Dip  in  the  slurry  and  breadcrumbs   a  second  time.

Take  a  frying  pan  with  one  inch  deep  oil  in  it  on  high  heat.  Gently  lower  the  croquets  and  lower  the  gas  to medium.  Fry  to  a  nice  brown  colour  turning  them  carefully  so  that  it  is  done  from  all  sides.  Collect  them  on  a  tissue  paper.

To  serve  sprinkle  some  “Chat  masala’  on  the  ‘Chawps’.  A  few  slices  of  onions  on  the  side  and  Tomato  ketchup to  dip  in.

Inside  Scoop;

When  frying  the  veggies  and  spice  mixture,  taste  to  make  changes.  We  like  it  spicy. You  can  titrate  it  to  your  taste.

Chaat  Masala  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

Makes  about  12-15  depending  on  the  size.

Baba  is  the  Bengali  word  for  Dad.

 

 

Aamrar tawk (Hog Plum Chutney)

By  Ratna

Aamrar tawk for blog-6

The  weather  outside  is  definitely  not  the  same  as  it  was  couple  weeks  ago.  The  leaves  are  changing  colour.  There  is  a  chill  in the  air.  We  just  finished  harvesting  the  vegetables  from  our  our  garden.  Beets,  lettuce,  carrots  are  exchanging  hands  in  the  office.  Reminiscing  the  summer  is  our  favourite   past  time  now.  ‘This  was  one  of  the  hottest  summer  in  a  long  time’.  ‘I  grew  cucumbers  and  melons  which  hardly  do  well  in  the  Prairie  summer’.  ‘I  even  have  a  tan  like  you’,  boasted  my  caucasian  friends.  We  all  agreed  time  has  come  to  say  good  bye  to  summer.

Aamrar tawk for blog-8

I  came  across  these   ” Aamras “,  in  an  Indian  grocery  store  last  time  I  was  in  the  city.  Known  as  Hog  plum  in  English,  the  fancy  Botanical  name  being   Spondias  mombin.  Many  many  summers  ago  in  India  I  distinctly  remember  how excited  we  were  to  see  Baba  emptying  Aamras  from  his  grocery  bag.  Those  were  the days  before  plastic  bags  were  in  vogue.  We  had  separate  fabric  bags   for  vegetables  and  fish.   Smooth  green  on  the  outside  resembling  a  guava  or  even  a  green  plum  it  had  a  tough  inside.   We  knew  Ma  would  cook  a  delicious  chutney  with  the  Aamras.  A  bit  sweet ,  a  bit  tart,  just  like  chutneys  are  supposed  to  be. The  teeth  were  put  to  good  use  those  long  summer  afternoons  relishing  the  fibrous  interior.

Aamrar tawk for blog-9Aamrar tawk for blog-3

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Aamra  cut  in  small  cubes                                            Four  fruits

Coconut  grated                                                             Three  Tbsp

Jaggery   (  ground  )                                                      One  cup

Sugar                                                                             One  and  a  half  cup

Red  chillies  (  dried  )                                                     A  couple  broken  into  pieces.

Poppy  seeds  or  Khus  Khus                                       Two  Tbsps.

Grated  ginger                                                               One  tsp.

Mustard  seeds                                                             One  tsp

Canola  Oil                                                                    Half  Tbsp

Method;

Wash  the  Aamra  pieces.

In  a  pan  take  half  a  Tbsp  of  Canola  oil  on  high  heat.  Add  a  couple  of  dried  red  chillies  and  a  tsp  of  mustard  seeds.  Wait  till  the  seeds  splutter,  then  add  the  cut  pieces  of  Aamra,  and  turn  the  gas  down  to medium.  Saute  for  about  three  to  four  minutes.  Add  two  cups  of  water.  Cover  and  let  it  come  to  a  boil.

Put  the  poppy seeds  in  a  grinder  and  make  a  smooth  paste.  I  usually  dry  grind  it  then  add  water  to  make  a  thick  paste.  Keep  aside.

Add  salt,  sugar  and  jaggery  now.  Next throw  in  the  ground  poppy  seeds  paste  .  You  will  find  it  thickening  fast.  Add  the  ginger  paste  and  more  water  only  to  make  it  to  your  desired  consistency.   Put  the  gas  off.  Garnish  with  grated  coconut.

Enjoy  it  with  rice  or  as  a  dip,  slather  it  on  bread  to  get  an  exotic  taste.

Inside  Scoop;

Store  in  a  glass  jar.  Keep  in  the  fridge.  Stays  well  for  a  week.

Baba  is  the  Bengali  word  for  Dad.

Poppy  seeds  or  KhusKhus  is  available  in  Indian  Grocery  stores.  Also  known  as  Posto  in   Bengali.

The  measurements  are  to  my  taste. It  is  alright  to  tweak  it  to  yours.

Saskatoon Berry Rosewater Popsicles

By  Ratna

saskatoon berry blog

The  faint  smell  of  roses  by  the  roadside  hit  me  only  after  I  had  walked  away  a  bit.  Like  an  afterthought.  These  are  Wildroses,  growing  abundantly  in  the  bushes  in  the  Prairies.  Differing from  their  uptown  cousin  Damask  roses  in  both    looks  and  fragrance. The  single  layer  of  petals  and  the  faint  fragrance  may  indicate  how  humble  they  are.  Far  from  contrary.  Below  their  plain  looks  they  are  extremely  resilient.  Surviving  the  minus  forty  Prairie  winters,  they  come  back  year  after  year.

Saskatoon Berry popsicles blog-3Saskatoon Berry popsicles blog-6

Our  little  Prairie  town  turned  one  hundred  this  year.  This  rural  town  doesn’t  boast  of  a   skyline  with  skyscrapers.  We  have  the  grain  silo  as  the  backdrop  instead.  Lakes  fed  with  natural  spring  water  dot  the  landscape.  The  Trumpeter  Swans  nest  in  them  year  after  year.  They  bring  up  the  Cygnets  and  migrate  to  the  warmer  south  in    winter.

Saskatoon Berry popsicles blog-2

 

 

In  the  early  days  people  migrated  here  from  the  east  as  well  as  Europe.  With  limited  resources,  little  bit  of  trepidation  and  a  lot  of  determination  they  started  farming.  They  toiled  the  earth.  The  growing  season  is  short  but  the  longer  daylight  hours  rewarded  them  with  bountiful  crops.The  winters  were  harsh.  They  did  not  give  up  though.  Just  like  the  wild roses,  they  were  resilient.

Saskatoon Berry popsicles blog-4

Berries  grow  in  the  wild  here.  Blueberries,  strawberries,  Saskatoon  berries  to  name  a  few.  This  summer  has  been  very  hot.  The  fruits  did  very  well  too.  Sweet  and  juicy  you  can’t  have  enough  of  those.  We  went  to  U-pick  farms  and  Farmer’s  market  to  get  the  freshest,  juiciest  berries.

Rosewater  is  a  very  common  flavour  in  desserts  in  India. I  used  Rosewater  flavour  for  these  popsicles  which  I  made  from  locally  grown  Saskatoon  Berries.

saskatoon berry popsicles blog-9

 

saskatoon berry blog-5

Recipe:

Ingredients:

Saskatoon  berries                                                               One  cup

Greek  yoghurt                                                                      One  Tbsp

Honey                                                                                    One  Tbsp

Walnut  chopped                                                                   One  Tbsp

Lemon  juice                                                                          One  tsp

saskatoon berry blog-6

Method;

Wash  the  berries.  Blend  them  with  the  yoghurt  and  honey  in  a  blender.  Add  bit  of  water  if  needed.  Strain  the  mixture  to  get  a  smooth  residue.  Throw  in  the  walnut  pieces.  Add  the  lemon  juice  and  Rosewater  and  stir  well.

Fill  up  the  popsicle  molds  with  this  solution  using  a  funnel.  Put  them  in  the  freezer  for  24  hours.  To  remove  the  popsicles  from  the  mold,  let  it  sit  in  warm  water.  It  separates  from  the  popsicle.

Inside  Scoop:

Rosewater  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.

All  measurements  can  be  tweaked  to  your  taste.