Persimmon Burfi for ‘Makar Sankranti’

Image

By  Ratna

persimmon burfi-3

Where  would  we  be  without  the  Sun?  Take  a  moment  and  think  about  it.  Wouldn’t  it  be  safe  to  say  that  our  whole  existence  would  be  at  stake?  Our  ancestors  realized  pretty  early  on  that  Sun  is  the  most  important  of  all  the  cosmic  bodies.  Hence  every  Sun  centric  event  became  important  spiritual  and  cultural  events  in  our  lives.

persimmon burfi

There  are  twelve  zodiac  signs.  The  Sun  is  the  centre,  motionless  and  constant.  The  earth  by  moving  around  the  sun  is  passing  from  one   zodiac  sign  to  the  next,  every  month.  This  transition  is  known  as  Sankranti.  There  are  twleve  Sankrantis.  Although  each  Sankranti  has  its  own  relative  importance,  the  Makar  Sankranti  is  special.  This  transitiion  is  from  Sagittarius  to  Capricorn.  It  is  celebrated  on  the  14th  of  January.

Transition  or  movement  can  only  be  appreciated  when  we  have  experienced  stillness.  Movement  and  stillness.  Stillness  and  movement.  We  need  one,  to  experience  the  other.   Two  diametrical  opposites, one  has  no  existence  without  the  other.  Just  like  night  and  day.  On  this  auspicious  day,  let  us  cultivate  the  stillness  within  ourselves  to  enjoy  the  movements  outside.  Birth,  childhood,  adulthood,  old  age.

Families  get  together  and  celebrate  with  food,  flying  kites,  bon  fire,  rangoli  (  drawing  design  in  front  of  the  house  ).  The  most  important  being  forgetting  all  differences  and  making  a  fresh  start.

persimmon burfi-6

persimmon burfi-7

Rice  pudding  with   jaggery,  sesame  seed  balls,  peanut  brittle  are  very  popular.  I  had  these  Persimmons  at  home.  Sticking  with  the  dessert  theme,  I  made  Burfis  with  them.

Happy  Makar  Sankranti  to  all  of  you.

persimmon burfi-5

Recipe:  Made  16  pieces

Ingredient;

Persimmon                                               Six,  cut  in  small  pieces.

Sugar                                                        Half  cup  or  to  taste.

Whole  milk                                               Two  cups

Milk  powder                                             Half  cup

Saffron                                                      A  large  pinch

Almonds                                                   !2-15,  thinly  sliced

Pistachios                                                 12-15 ,  thinly  cut

Coconut  powder                                      Half  cup

Cardamom  powder                                  Half  tsp

Method;

Soak  the  saffron  in  a  Tbsp  of  warm  milk  and  keep  aside.

Make  a  puree  from  the  cut  pieces  of  Persimmon.

In  a  saucepan  on  medium  heat,  mix  the  persimmon  puree  and  sugar.  Wait  till  all  the  sugar  melts,  and  you  have  a  sauce.

In  another  saucepan  add  the  milk,  milk  powder,  coconut  powder  on  medium  heat.  Add  the  persimmon  sauce.  Keep  stirring  so  that  it  doesn’t  stick  to  the  bottom of  the  pan.  You  may  even  want  to  crank  down  the  heat  to  low.  The  whole  mixture  will  start  to  thicken  slowly  and  tend  to  leave  the  side  of  the  pan.  It  took  me  about  45  minutes  to  get  a  soft  dough.  Add  cardamom  powder  and  soaked  saffron.  Put  the  gas  off.

Line  a  cookie  sheet  with  wax  paper.  Transfer  the  above  to  the  cookie  sheet.  Spread  evenly,  such  that  it  is  about  half  inch  thick.  Cut  into  squares.  Let it  sit  on  the  counter  until  it  cools  down  to  room  temperature,  then  throw  it  in  the  refrigerator.  I  left  it  overnight.

Garnish  with  almond  and  pistachio  slices  and  sprinkle  a  few  more  saffron  strands.

Enjoy  with  your  family.

Inside  Scoop;

Milk  mixture  sticking  to  the  bottom  of  the  pan  is  common,  do  not  stop stirring.

Some  of  the  text  regarding  the  meaning  of  Makar  Sankranti  was  from  Isha foundation.org

 

 

 

Kefir and Turmeric Lassi

Image

By  Ratna

kefir and turmeric lassi fg-2

A  new  year,  new  beginning.  The  thirty  below  zero  Celsius  temperatures  and  a  couple  feet  of  snow  outside  doesn’t  let  me  believe  that  there  is  a  ‘new’  anything.   We  are  in  the  middle  of  a  long  winter.  How  can  the  change  of  a  calendar  page  mean  the  beginning  of  everything  new.  January  could  be  just  any  other  month  of  the  year.  Yet  it  is  not.  It  is a  new  start.  Time  is  measured  in  linear  fashion,  length  of  time,   not  a  circle,  where  there  is  no  beginning  or  end.  How  hard  would  that  be.  How  suffocating  would  that  feel.  January  means  new  hopes,  new  possibilities,  new  resolutions  or  even  new  direction.    There  will  be  spring  coming  soon  bringing  life  to  nature.  Days  will  be  long  again.  Birds  will  be  back.  It  is  time  for  new  efforts,  new  plans,  new memories!  .

kefir turmeric lassi-2

.How  about  a  new  Lassi.  I  grew  up  with  yoghurt  lassi,  sweet  or  salty,  plain  or  with  fruits  added.  Kefir  is  new  too  me.  I  replaced  yoghurt  with  Kefir.  The health  benefits  are  many.  It  is  good  for  the  gut,  antimicrobial,  anti inflammatory,  helps  prevent  cancer,  helps  with  allergies..  Turmeric  has  health  benefits  as  mentioned  in  Ayurveda.  New  researches  are  confirming  what  Ayurveda  had  already  substantiated.  Mixing  the  two  could  only  be  a  win  win  situation.

The  inspiration  for  this  Lassi  came  to  me  while  reading  this  lovely  blog

I  wish  you  all  a  fantastic  new  year.

Recipe:

Serves  Two

Ingredients;

Kefir  ( Organic Meadow)                                                         2  cups

Fresh turmeric                                                                        One  inch  grated

Cumin  seeds                                                                         One  Tbsp

Kala  namak  (Rock  salt)                                                         To  taste

Ice  cubes  (Optional)

Method;

Dry  roast  the  cumin  seeds.  Coarse  grind  them  and  keep  aside.

In  a  blender,  blend  the  kefir,  grated  turmeric  and  salt  till  frothy.

Serve  in  tall  glasses  garnished  with  the  ground  cumin  seeds  and  few  pieces  of  grated  turmeric.

Inside  Scoop;

The  fresh  turmeric  stains  pretty  much  everything.  Wearing  a  pair  of  gloves  may  not  be  a  bad  idea.

Kala  Namak  is  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores  as  Rock  salt.

 

Nankhatai: Eggless Indian Biscuits

Image

By  Ratna

nankhataifg

The  Cherub  faced  baby  with  a  wreath  around  his  head  looked  down  on  me.  Holding  hands  with  the  baby  standing  next  to  him  they  formed  a  circle,  in  the  painting  on  the  sky  blue  coloured  biscuit  tin.  The   lid  of  the  tin   had  a  knob  in  the  centre  for  better  grip.  The  tin   was   purposely  kept  on  the  top  rack  in  our  kitchen  cupboard,  behind  the  pickle  jars,  above  the  spice  rack,  well  beyond  our  reach.  “Ebar  Paetey  baytha  hawbe,  dekho”,  You’ll  have  a  tummy  ache,  mind  you!  Ma’s  repeated  warnings  didn’t  have  much  effect  on  us.  C,  our  youngest  sister,  was  given  the  duty  to  keep  an  eye  on  Ma’s  movements.  Assigned  with  such  a  responsible  job   at  the  tender  age  of  six,  she  kept  running  back  and  forth  from  the  kitchen  to  the  verandah  with  a  silly  grin  on  her  face,  almost  foiling  our  attempt.    We  had  studied  Ma’s  schedule  very  carefully,  the  times  that  she  was  away  from  the  kitchen  and  how  long  for.  What  was  the  safest  bet  in  terms  of  the  time  needed  for  us  to  make  the  heist.  The  biscuit  heist.  We  agreed  the  time  after  lunch  would  be  ideal.

nankhataifg-3

It  was  a  perfect  winter  afternoon.  Ma  and  her  friends   busy  with  their  knitting  projects  on  the   wrap  around   verandah  past  the  living  room.  Sitting  with  their  backs  to  the  sun,  drying  their  long  hairs  draped  over  their  sarees.  Exchanging  new  patterns  for  cardigans,  mittens  or  discussing  remedies  for  the  aphids  in  the  rose  bush  they  would  make  the  best  use  of  the  short  winter  sun.  The  kitchen  with  two  big  windows  was  on  the  far  end  of  the  house  separated  by  the  dining  room  and  the  living  room  with  long  flowing  Chartreuse  green  curtains  in  between.  Bhugli,  our  household  help,  would  be  dusting  the  bedroom  meticulously  at  that  time.  The  bedroom  forked  out  from  the  dining  room  past  a  narrow  corridor  with  the  laundry  racks,  making  it  parallel  to  the  living  room.  With  Baba  at  work  the  timing  couldn’t  have  been  better.

I  stood  on  my  toes,  precariously  balancing  my  body  on  a  wobbly  stool.  B,  my  eight  year  old  sister,  hung on  to  the  stool  with  all  her  might  to  avoid  any  fall.  Only  two  years  younger  than  me,  she  was  my  loyal  partner  in  crime.  Her  curly  black  hair  formed  a  halo  around  her  head  which  was  tilted  back  causing  her  mouth  to  open.  Two  pairs  of  eyes  were  fixed  on  the  biscuit  tin.  We  knew  the  inside  of  the  tin  as  good  as  the  back  of  our  hands.  A  cream  coloured  corrugated  paper  lined  the  inside.  Layers  of  assorted  biscuits,  not  cookies,  lay  separated  with  wax  paper.  Some  were  rectangular  with  curly  edges  and  sugar  dusted  tops.  Others  were  round  one  on  top  of  another  with  a  hole  in  the  middle    showing  the   red  jam  inside.  Then  there  were  sandwich  biscuits  with  sweet  orange  flavoured  cream  in  between.  Unaware  of  their  fancy  names  like  Linzer  or  Thumbprint  cookies,  they  were  all  ‘Cream  Bishcoot’  to  us.

Outside  the  east  facing  window  in  the  kitchen  was  the  Guava  tree.  Its  branches  spreading  all  around  like  an  open  umbrella,  almost  brushing  against  this  window.  The  green  parrots  with  their  sharp  red  beaks  often  frequented  these  branches.  They  came  in  flocks,  ate  some  guavas,  scattered  a  few  around.  They  were  not  bashful  at  all  with  their  habits,  could  be  heard  from  a  distance.    Not  sure  what  happened  first.  There  appeared  a  spider  from  nowhere  in  the  cupboard,  or  was  it  the  parrot  with  its  high  pitched  chirp,  as  if  warning  Ma  about  our  plan.  I  lost  my  balance,  hit  my  sister  on  her  head  breaking  her  front  tooth  with  blood  oozing  from  her  mouth,  her  painful  cry  brought  Ma  running  to  the  kitchen.  Whatever  the  sequence,  it  all happened  very  fast  and  brought  our  carefully  detailed  plan  down  just  like  a   house  of  cards.

nankhataifg-5nankhataifg-4

Although  there  were  no  Nankhatais  in  the  tin  I  would  like  to  warn  you  these  melt –  in –  the –  mouth  cookies  would  make  you  feel  like  going  for  more!

Sending  very  warm  holiday  wishes  to  all  of  you  from  the  cold  Prairies.

Recipe:

Adapted  from  Nishamadhulika.com  with  slight  changes.  Made  16  pieces.

Ingredients;

All  purpose  flour                                                       Half  cup

Chickpea  flour  (  Besan  )                                         Half  cup

Ghee                                                                          Half  cup

Powdered  sugar                                                       Half  cup

Baking  powder                                                         One  quarter  tsp

Cardamom  powder                                                 One  quarter  tsp

Pistachio  pieces                                                      About  one  Tbsp  to  garnish

Method;

In  a  bowl  take  ghee  and  sugar  and  mix  thoroughly  until  smooth  and  creamy.  Keep  aside.

In  another  bowl  sieve  the  all  purpose  flour,  Besan,  baking  powder  and  cardamom  powder.  Mix  this  to  the  sugar  mixture,  slowly  and  form  into  a  dough.  If  needed  add  little  bit  of  milk  to  bind.  If  a  bit  sticky  dust  a  bit  of  flour.  Let  this  sit  for  15  to  20  minutes.

Preheat  the  oven  to  390  degrees F.                   .

Form  small  balls  from  the  rested  dough,  about  a  Tbsp  measure  each  and  slightly  flatten  them  with  the  palm  of  your  hands.  Gently  press  a  few  pieces  of  Pistachios  on  top.  You  can  also  do  without  the  nuts.

Bake  at  330  degrees  F  for  15  to  18  minutes.  Take  them  out  of  the  oven  and  cool  them  on  a  wire  rack.

Inside  scoop;

Traditionally  Nankhatais  come  plain.  Garnishing  with  nuts  is  optional.

Baba  is  the  Bengali  word  for  Dad,  Ma  for  Mum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Punjeeri Laddus: Rejuvenating dumplings for new mums

Image

By  Ratna

Punjeeri laddu-5

Smita  picked  up  the  parcel  that  was  left  at  her  doorstep  by   Canada  Post.  It  was  more  bulky  than  heavy.  Standing  on  the  snow  covered  steps,  she  visualized  a  beautiful,  pleasant,  sunny  day.  Her  mother  sitting  on  the  low  stool  carefully  measuring  each  ingredient,  first  running  her  fingers  swiftly  through  the  nuts  or  seeds,  discarding  the  husks,  washing,  grinding,  and  finally  assembling  the  Laddus.  Smita  knew  that  more  than  any  other  ingredient  it  was  a  generous  amount  of  love  that  was  binding  the  Laddus.

A  little  kick  inside  her  brought  her  back  to  the  present.  If  only  she  could  travel  that  fast,  she  thought.   Two  oceans  separated  her  and   her  mother,  half  way  across the  world.   Smita  pushed  the  door  with  her  back  and  stepped  inside.  The  last  few  months  had  changed  her  body  such  that   she  needed  extra  room  to  move  around.  A  new  life  was  growing inside  her.

Punjeeri laddu-4

Being  a  registered  nurse  herself  she  thought  she  had  experienced  it  all.  Far  from the  truth.  Everyday  she  marvelled  at  how  the  little  bump  inside  her  was  evolving.  From seemingly  nothing  it  took  shape. “The  little  extensions  were  for  arms  and  legs”,  her  doctor  had  showed   her  on  the  fuzzy  black  and  white  ultrasound  picture.  She  even  let  her  listen  to  the  baby’s  heartbeat…

…”The  saunf,  ajwain  will  help  in  digestion,  the  Punjeeri  will  help  in  lactation and  gaining  your  strength  back”  her  mother  reminded  her  over  Skype  the  other  day.  Excitedly  telling  her  how  to  bathe  and  massage  her  new  grand  baby.  Holding  the  bundle  of  joy  close  to  her  heart  Smita  was  convinced  that  it  was  nothing  less than  a  miracle.  A  tiny  human  complete  with  eyebrows  above  the  eyes  and  nails  at  the  end  of  the  little  fingers.  After  becoming  a  mum  herself  she  realized  no  amount  of  reading  or  working  in  the  same  field  could  prepare  her  for  this  experience.  As  she  bit  into  the  Punjeeri  Laddu  that  her  mum  had  sent  her  all  the  way  from  India,  she  suddenly  remembered  her  Anatomy  teacher.  “Any  time  you  have  a  tiff  with  your  mother”,  he  had  said,  “bow  down,  look  at  your  belly  button  and  remember  your  debt  to  her”.

Recipe:   Made  20  pieces

Ingredients;

Whole  wheat  flour                                         One  cup

Almonds  coarsely  chopped                          Three  quarter  cup

Melon  seeds,  washed                                   One  quarter  cup

Fox  nuts  (  Makhana  )                                    Half  cup  cut  in  pieces

Pistachios                                                      One  Quarter  cup  chopped

Ghee                                                                Three  quarter  cup

Edible  gum  (  Gaund  )                                    Half  cup  broken  in  pieces

Sugar                                                               One  and  quarter  cup

Carom  seeds  (  Ajwain  )                              One  tsp crushed

Dried  ginger  powder  ( Sonth )                        One  tsp

Fennel  powder  ( Saunf )                                  One  tsp

Cardamom  powder                                          One  tsp

Water                                                                 Half  cup

Method:

Dry  roast  the  melon  seeds  for  a  minute  till  it  popped.  Collect  them  in  a  container  and  keep  aside.

Take  one  Tbsp  of  ghee  in  the  same  wok  and  fry  the  Makhana  for  a  few  minutes  till  crunchy.  Keep  it  aside. Take  another  two  Tbsp  of  ghee  and  add  the  Gaund,  fry  for  a  few  minutes.  Look  for  changes  in  colour  and  increase  in  volume.  Collect  them  in  a  bowl.

Take  the  rest  of  the  ghee  and  add  the  flour.  Roast  it  for  four  to  five  minutes  stirring  constantly.  To  this  add  the  almonds,  pistachios,  ajwain,  sonth,  fennel  seed  powder,  cardamom  powder,  Gaund,  melon  seeds  and  Makhana  and  mix  well.

In  a  separate  bowl  take  half  cup  of  water,   add  three  quarter  cup  of  sugar  and  bring  it  to  a  boil.  Let  it  reach  220  degrees  centigrade.  Use  a  candy  thermometer.  Pour  this  syrup  over  the  flour  mixture.  Switch  the  gas  off.  Mould  into  golf  ball  size  dumplings  while  still  warm.

Enjoy  with  a  glass  of  milk.

Gluten  free  version;

Substitute  one  cup  grated  coconut  in  place  of  whole  wheat  flour  and  follow  the  same  recipe.

Inside  Scoop:

Melon  seeds  known  as  Charmagaz,  Foxnuts  known  as  Phool  makhana,  Edible  gum  also  known  as  Gaund  are  available  in  Indian  grocery  store.

Each  family  will  usually  have  their  own  recipes.  I  have  followed  the  recipe  from  Manjula’s  kitchen  with  very  minor  changes.

I  had  used  the  Gluten  free  Sunblest  Organic  Coconut  flour  from  Costco.  I felt  a  couple  more  Tbsps  of  ghee  would’ve  made  the  gluten  free  Laddus  more  moist.

 

 

 

 

Barley and vegetable soup

Image

By Ratna

Barley and vegetable soup-4

It  was  one  of  those  days when  I  was  spending  a  bit  of  time  ( read  all  my  time ),  gawking  at  the  delicious  photographs  on  Foodgawker.  This  one  picture  caught  my  eye  just  because of  its simplicity.  Few  ingredients,  few  steps  and  a  soul  warming  result. With  the  weather the  way  it  is , It  didn’t  take  me  long   to  decide  on  the  menu  for  supper.

The  temperature  outside  plummeted  from  three  below  to  thirty  below  zero  celsius in  a  matter  of  a  day.  The  migratory  birds  did  not  need  the  report  from  the Meterologists,  they  left  for  the  warmer  climates  just  in  time.  The  lakes  are  frozen solid.  The  evergreens  are  bowed  with  the  weight  of  the  snow  on  them.  The  branches  of  the  deciduous  trees   look  highlighted  with  the  snow  on  them.  The furnitures  on  the  deck  covered  with  half  feet  of  snow  only  reminding  us  that summer  is  only  a  dream  now.  The  sun  so  strong   yet  powerless  to  melt  the  snow.

Barley and vegetable soup-5

I  have  tweaked  the  recipe  a  little  bit,  added  a  bit  of  heat  and  countered  it  with  a  couple  squirts  of  lemon  juice  and  apple  puree.

Recipe;

Ingredients;

Barley                                                             One cup

Mushrooms                                                    Half cup chopped

Carrots                                                           Half cup,  cut  in  small  cubes

Apple                                                             One,  pureed

Cauliflower                                                     Half cup,  in  small  florets

Kaffir lime  juice                                              Half  tsp

Red  chillies                                                    Optional,  Few  flakes

Salt  and  Pepper                                            To  taste

Ghee                                                               One  Tbsp

Bay  leaf                                                          Couple

Peppercorns                                                    Six  or  seven

Lime leaves                                                      Optional,  a  couple.

 

Method;

Take  a  Tbsp  of  ghee  in  a  pan  on  high  heat.  When  it  melts  add  the  Bay leaf  and  peppercorns.  Saute  for  a  few  minutes.  Add  the  carrots  first  then  cauliflowers.  Cook  for  a  few  minutes  till  the  florets  get  some  colour.  Add  the  mushrooms  last.  Add  two  cups  of  water,  cover  and  cook  till  the  vegetables  are  done.  Throw  in  the  apple  puree.

Boil  the  barley  with  two  cups  of  water  till  done.

Add  the  vegetables,  salt,  pepper  to  the  boiled  barley.  Throw  in  the Kaffir  lime  leaves  for  flavour.  Garnish  with  green  or  red  chillies  and cilantro.

Chirer Polau : Beaten Rice Pilaf

Image

By  Ratna

chirer polau-2

Both  of  our  eyes  were  fixed  on  the  measuring  bowl.  Eak,  Doh,  Teen  she  counted  out  loud  making  sure  there  was  no  room  for  error  either  in  her  count  or  the  way   the  Chire  was  packed  in  the  grapefruit  sized  round  silver  bowl.  There  were  no  pre  packed  options  or  any  balance  to  weigh  the  amount.  Each  bowl  was  supposed  to  be  the  equivalent  of  a  Powa  ( 250 gms  approx ).  After  the  desired  amount  was  measured   it  was  customary  to  ask  for  Fau  ( extra )  to  make  up  for  any  unforseen  error  that  could’ve  escaped   even  the  watchful  of  eyes.  After  all  the  silver  bowl  with  a  couple  dents  on  its  side  had  seen  better  days.  Mahatoin   sat  hunched  on  the  floor, the  heavy   silver  armlets,  necklace  and  earring  on  her  ebony  colour  skin  was  as  if  out  of  a  Sepia  print.  The  transaction  done,  it  was  time  to  exchange  some  pleasantaries.   She  adjusted  the  end  of  her  sari  and  checked  on  the  suckling  baby  attached  to  her  body.  We  discuss   about  how  the  crops  turned  out  or  what  the  city  life  was  like.

The  Chire  was  wrapped  in  a  big  piece  of  cloth  with  a  secure  knot.  This  was  then  seated  in  a  large  wicker  basket.  Another  long  piece  of  fabric  was  folded  on  itself  to  act  as  a  padding.  Mahatoin  seated  the  padding  on  her  head.  Her  fingers  then  ran  on  the  knot  behind  her  neck,  making  sure  the  cloth   holding  the  baby  was  secure.  Satisfied  with  the  ”  systems  check”  so  far,  she  now  bends  to  lift  the  big  basket  on  her  head.  Her  left  leg  makes  a  small  move  as  she  balances  herself.  The  baby  with  a  full  tummy  now  fast  asleep.  Mahatoin  flashes  a  big  smile  and  bids  farewell  to me  as  she  gets  ready  to  continue  with  her  hawking.  Life  was  that  simple.

chirer polau

I  had  moved  out  of  home  by  then  to  the  university,  and  was  back  only  for  holidays.  Ma  would  try  to  fit  in  as  many  delicacies  as  she  possibly  could  within  that  limited  time.  Chirer  Polau  used  to  be  our  snack  for  the  afternoon.   There  could  be  nothing  fresher  than  the  beaten  rice  Mahatoin  brought  to  our  door.  Made  from  the  latest  harvest  with  no  additives  or  modifications,  genetic  or  otherwise.  Beaten  rice  being  lighter  than  regular  rice   was  thought  to  be  the  right  choice  for  an  afternoon  snack.  This  Polau  was  cooked  with  a  variety  of  spices,  nuts,  a  few  choice  veggies  tipping  the  final  taste  to  the  sweet  side.

chirer polau fg-2

 

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Beaten  rice                            Two  cups

Cauliflower                              Half  cup  cut  in  small  florets

Potato                                    Half  cup  cut  in  small  cubes

Cashew  nuts                         One  Tbsp

Raisins                                   One  Tbsp

Bay  leaf                                   Couple

Cloves                                    two

Cumin  seeds                       Half  tsp

Dried  red  chilli                     One

Cinnamon  stick                   Two  inches  long  broken  in  pieces

Ginger                                 One  inch  long  grated

Salt                                     To  taste

Sugar                                 Two  tsps

Frozen  peas                      Half  cup

Saffron                               Few  strands

Canola oil                           One  Tbsp

Ghee                                 Two  Tbsps

Milk                                   One  tsp

Method.

Gently  wash  the  beaten  rice  only  once  and  spread  it  out  on  kitchen  towel  to  dry.

Take  the  milk  in  a  small  bowl  and  warm  it  in  the  microwave,  soak  the  saffron  strands  in  it  and  keep  it  aside.

Heat  about  a  tsp  of  Canola  oil  in  a  non  stick  pan  and  throw  in  the  cumin  seeds  and  red  chilli  in  it.  As  soon  as  the  cumin  seeds  get  a  bit  of  colour  throw  in  the  cut  potato  pieces  a  pinch  of  salt  and  cook  covered.  Put  the  gas  off  as  soon  as  the  potatoes  are  done  and  has  some  colour.  Collect  them  in  a  bowl.

Heat  another  tsp  of  oil  in  the  same  pan  and  this  time  fry  the  cauliflower  pieces  covered  with  a  pinch  of  salt  until  done.  Collect  them  in  a  bowl.

Now  add  the  ghee  in  the  pan  and  let  it  heat  up.  Throw  in  the  bay  leaf  first,  cinnamon  stick,  cloves,  cardamom,  grated  ginger,  cashew  nuts  and  raisins.  Fry  for  a  few  minutes  till  the  raisins  plump  up,  add  the  beaten  rice,  salt  and  sugar.  Be  very  gentle  in  stirring  only  to  assemble  things  together.  Add  the  frozen  peas  last.  Pour  the  saffron  soaked  milk  over  the  Polau.

The  final  taste  tends  to  be  a  bit  sweet.  Enjoy  while  it  is  still  hot.

Inside  scoop:

Chire  is   Beaten  rice  available  in  Indian  grocery  stores.  It  is  also  known  as  Poha.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kalakand: Milk Cake

Image

By  Ratna

kalakand

We  didn’t  say  “trick  or  treat”  or  dress up  in  scary  costume.  The  days  after  Durga  Pujo  were  for  visiting  all  our  neighbours  and  showing  them  Pranam  ( respect ).  Just  doing  that  would  mean  we  would  be  treated  with  delicious  snacks  or  dessert  or  even  a  full  meal.  It  was  not  just  an  evening  either.  You  had  about  a  whole  week  for  that.  It  was  no  surprise  that  we  played  our  cards  right.  We  would  sit  down  with  our  friends  to  make  a  fool  proof  plan.  We  divided  the  neighbourhood  houses  into  different  zones.  A  couple  in  the  morning  a  couple  in  the  evening.  Any  ‘insider  information’  on  the  nature  of  snack  offered  in  a  particular  house  could  alter  our  plan  accordingly.  How  I  remember  those  fun  filled  days…

kalakand-2

Durga  Puja  is  celebrated  in  India   around  September  or  October.  Godess  Durga  is  Shakti  ( power).  She  emerges  victorious  after  her  fights  with  the  demon  Mahishashur.  Now  that  is  a  reason  to  celebrate.  The  festivities  goes  on  for  nine  days.  New  clothes,  no  studies,  fasting  and  feasting  are  the  hallmark  of  Durgapujo.  Even  the  weather  cooperates  with  mild  temperatures  making  it  a  magical  time  of the year.

Nobody  made  sweets  like  Bowneer  Thakuma  (  Bownee’s  Granma ).  Be  it   one   dunked  in  syrup  or  just  dry  Barfi   (  fudge  ).  Her  house  was  on  our  ‘priority  list.’  Oma  dekhi  kawto  bawro  holi,  O  my  look  how  much  you’ve  grown,  she  said  adjusting  the  end  of  her  sari  which  had  a  bunch  of  keys  tied  to  it.  Always  in  crisp  white  sari  with  no  border  she  savoured  the  moments  as  she  watched  us  savour  her  sweets.  Too  young  to  worry  about   why  she  wore  only  crisp  white,  we  licked  our  plates  clean.  It  was much  later  that  I  found  out  that  it  was  the  societies  requirement  that  she  be  dressed  in  a  particular  way  or  change  her  eating  habits  just  because  her  husband  was  no  more.  How  this  cruel  societal  bias   could  never  take  away  the  smile  from  her  crinkly  face,  the  love  to  go  through  the  elaborate  cooking  to  see  others  happy,  amazed  me.

Kalakand  or  milk  fudge is  usually  done  from whole  milk  in  India.  It  usually  takes  hours  over  slow  flame  to  get  it  right.  Thanks  to  Ricotta  cheese,  making  Kalakand  can  be  a  breeze  now.

kalakand-3

Recipe:

Ingredients;

Ricotta  cheese                         Saputo  light  500gm  tub.

Condensed  milk                       Eagle  brand  300  ml  tin.

Pistachio  nuts                           Handful  Chopped.

Cardamom  powder                  One  eighth  tsp

Method;

Empty  the  cheese  in  a cheese  cloth  and  let  it drain for  about  half  hour.  Now  mix  this  cheese  and  condensed  milk  in  a  microwave  safe  deep  bowl.  Cover  and  cook  for  5  minutes  on  high.  Stir  and  let  it  sit  for  two minutes.  Repeat  the  process  again   for  5  minutes. Stir  and  let  it  sit  for  two  minutes.  This  time  cook  for  one  minute  intervals,  stirring  in  between  for  a  total  10  minutes.  Add  the  cardamom  powder.  Mix  well.

Transfer  this  to  a  greased  square  pan.  Make  square  cuts  so  that  the  pieces  are  about  an  inch  square. Refrigerate  for  half  hour.  Garnish  with  chopped  pistachio  nuts  and  serve.

Inside  Scoop

The  aim  of  the  above  procedure  is  to  achieve  a  soft  dough.  The  time  of  cooking  can  be  used  as  a  guide,  depending  on  the  humidity,  brand  of  cheese,  it  may  need  to  be  tweaked  a  bit.

The  mixture  tends  to  sputter,  so  cover  it  with  a  microwave  cover  with  vents.

The  final  result  is  a  granular  texture  as  shown  in  the  picture,  not  creamy  and  smooth.

Traditionally  Kalakand  is  not  too  sweet.  It  is  ok  to  play  with   the   amount  of  condensed  milk  in  the  recipe.

I  wouldn’t   slack  on  stirring  as  it  prevents  the  milk  solids  from  sticking  to  the  pan.